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Bulletin of the University of Georgia 



The State Normal School 



ATHENS, GEORGIA 



Seventeenth Annual Session 



1911-12 



MAY, 1911 

Issued Monthly by the University 



Entered at the Post-Office at Athens, Ga., as Second-Class Matter, August 30, 
1905, under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894. 

Vol. XI. Serial No. I 59. No. 9 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 



U 



>- 

UJ 

D 

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CALENDAR 1911-12 



1911. 

Sept. I, Friday — School Dormitories open. 

Sept. 2, Saturday — Review Class Entrance Examinations, 9 

o'clock a. m. 
Sept. 4. Monday — Freshman Class Entrance Examinations, 9 

o'clock a. m. 
Sept. 5, Tuesday — Fall term begins at 9 a. m. Conditioned 

Students Examinations at 3 p. m. 
O Dec. 16-21 — Common School Review Examinations. 
Dec. 22, Friday — Christmas Holidays begin. 



1912. 



fan. 4, Thursday — Re-opening of School Session. 
>_ Jan. 18-25 — Mid-session Examinations. 
^ April 17, Wednesday — Founder's Day. 
c£ May 24, Friday — Annual meeting of Board of Trustees at 

CO 

3 130 p. m. Annual Concert at 8 130 p. m. 
_i May 25, Saturday — Alumni-ae Day, Reunion at 12 noon. 
^ Annual Alumni-ae Banquet at 6 p. m. 

O May 26, Sunday — Commencement Sermon at 5 :oo p. m. 
h- May 2~. Monday — Graduating Exercises and Commencement 
•£ Address at 11 :oo a. m. 



w New students may enter at any time during the year, but k is 

60 best for them to enter September 1, or January 4. 

O Prospective students will need to apply well in advance of their 

-^ coming in order to be sure of places in our dormitories. We can 

O accommodate only 400 students at present. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 



A CANDID WORD WITH PARENTS. 



Students get restless and homesick before the Christmas 
holidays begin, and again before the session ends. They write 
begging letters to the parents, asking permission to come home. 
The school in consequence suffers confusion and its work is 
seriously crippled thereby. A week or so of valuable time is 
practically lost out of the session every year for reasons like 
these. 

It has therefore become necessary to establish the following 
regulations : 

Students must not leave the school before the holidays 
begin, Dec. 22, or before the session ends, May 27, and fall 
term students must not re-enter tardily when the session is 
resumed upon Jan. 4, without permission of the Dean, Mr. 
Alexander Rhodes. The student violating this rule will not 
be allowed to re-enter the school. 

The Dean will allow no variations or exceptions except for 
providential reasons. When these reasons arise in the home, 
parents or guardians must communicate directly with the 
Dean by letter, telegram, or telephone. 

Please refer to the Dean all letters from students asking 
for variations from these proper regulations. 

Except for providential reasons, you ought not to ask the 
Dean to set them aside. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



T. J. Shackelford, Athens, Ga. 
Geo. A. Meix, Athens, Ga. 



President 
Secretary and Treasurer 



MEMBERS EX-OFFICIO. 

Governor Hoke Smith - 

State School Commissioner, L. M. Brittain 

Chancellor University of Georgia, David C. Barrow 

MEMBERS-AT-LARGE. 



Atlanta 
Atlanta 
Athens 

Athens 
Agnes 

Athens 
Athens 

MEMBERS REPRESENTING THE UNIVERSITY TRUSTEES. 

Augustus O. Bacon - Washington, D. C. 

Hamilton McYVhorter - - Athens 

B. B. Bower, Jr., - - - - - Bainbridge 



Col. 


W. J. Morton 


J. R 


Hogan 


T.J. 


Shackelford 


E.J 


Bondurant 



MEMBERS CITY OF ATHENS. 



MEMBERS 

First District 
Second District 
Third District 
Fourth District 
Fifth District 
Sixth District 
Seventh District 
Eighth District 
Ninth District 
Tenth District 
Eleventh District 






■ 



11 o 



REPRESENTING CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS. 

Joseph W. Smith, Manassas 

S. B. Brown, Albany 

J. M. Collum, Americus 

- A. A. Carson, Columbns 

- J. R. Smith, Atlanta 

Beauchamp, Williamson 

E. S. Griff eth, Buchanan 

E. A. Copelan, Greensboro 

D. M. Brand, Lawrenceville 

Lawton B. Evans, Augusta 

Charles Lane, Helena 



Dr. J. C 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 



Salaries — Carson, Beauchamp. Brown, Brand, Kvans, Hogan. 

Teachers and Course of Study — Collum, Kvans, Lane, Bacon 
Barrow, Brittain. 

Finance — Brand, Carson, Brown, Copeland, Bower, J. R. Smith. 

Grounds and Buildings— Bondurant, J. W., Smith, Morton, Barrow 
Griff eth. 

Prudential Committee— Brittain, Morion, Barrow, Bondurant, 
McYVhorter. 

The President of the Board of Trustees is a member of all standing 
Committees, and the President of the BChcM is a consulting member of 
the same. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 



FACULTY AND OFFICERS. 



D. C. BARROW, IX. D, 

(Chancellor University of Georgia.) 
Chancellor Ex-Officio. 

E. C. BRANSON, A. M., 

President. 

ALEXANDER RHODES, 
Dean. 

MISS P. B. NEWTON, 
Registrar. 



PETER E. BROWN, A. M., 
English and Literature. 

MRS., GERTRUDE A. ALEXANDER, A. M. 

Expression. 

D. L. EARNEST, A. M., 
Physics and Chemistry. 

T. E. HOLLINGSWORTH, A. B., 

Mathematics. 

MISS ROBERTA HODGSON, 
History and Civics. 

F. A. MERRILL, 
Geography, Botany, and Nature Study. 

MISS IDA A. YOUNG, 
Latin 

MISS HELEN L. SPROUT, 
I .crnian and Greek. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 

JOSEPH LUSTRAT, Bach es Lett. 
French. 

C. H. BRUCE, A. B., 
Psychology and Pedagogy. 

MISS EDNA M. RANDELL, 
Domestic Science. 

E. SCOTT SELL, B, Agr., 
Agriculture. 

F. J. Orr, B. E., 
Manual Arts. 

MISS GERTRUDE E. WOOD, 
Director Music Department. 

MISS LEONA McCULLOCH, 
Common School Extension Worker. 

MISS LILY REYNOLDS, 
Common School Extension Worker. 

MISS AGNES GOSS, 
Librarian. 

MISS WILLIE FAGAW 
Y. W. C. A. Secretary. 

MISS ANNE P. KOLB. 
Physical Culture. 

MISS ILA W. BROADUS, 
Trained Nurse. 



ALEXANDER RHODES, 
Assistant in Agriculture. 

MISS CHLOE LOYD. 
Assistant in English. 



IO STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 

MRS. G. A. ALEXANDER, 
Assistant in Literature. 

MISS ANNIE LINTON, 
Assistant in Science. 

MISS CHLOE ALLEN, 

Assistant in Science. 

MISS ANNIE MATTHEWS, 
Assistant in Mathematics. 

MISS JESSIE REDD, 
Assistant in History and Geography. 

MISS PARNA HILL, 
Assistant in Domestic Science. 

MISS KATE E. HICKS, 
Assistant in Psychology and Pedagogy. 

MISS BESSIE M. HARDY, 
Assistant in Music. 

MISS KATHERINE G. HERRON, 
Assistant in Music. 

MISS MARGARET M. GIBBS, 
Cataloguer in Library. 

MISS EMMA POLLARD, 
Student-Assistant in Library. 

MISS ESTELLE POLAND, 
Student- Assistant in Physical Culture. 

MUSCOGEE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 

C. H. BRUCE, 
Director. 

MISS ALICE L. PRICHARD, 
Principal. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. II 

MISS ELIZABETH YOUNG, 
Teacher. 

MISS MARY M. WOODS, 
Teacher. 

MISS LOUISE HEMINGWAY, 
Teacher. 

MISS IRIS CALLAWAY, 
Teacher. 

MISS MARJORIE FORD. 
Teacher. 



CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL. 

Courses by the 17 Heads of Departments. 



DORMITORY MANAGEMENT. 

ALEXANDER RHODES, 
Dormitory Manager. 

.MISS EMMIE C. JONES, 

Bookkeeper. 

MRS. H. M. MATHEW >. 
Housekeeper. 

MISS NELLIE C< >LBERT, 
Matron Gilmer Hall. 

MISS CHLOE AlLEN, 

Matron Bradwell Hall. 

MISS ALICE L. PRICHARD, 

Matron Winnie I )avis 1 [all. 

MISS KATE MICKS. 
Matron Senior Hall. 



12 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 

NEW TEACHERS. 

MR. C. H. BRUCE, Chair Psychology and Pedagogy. 
An A. B. graduate of Emory College; Supt. Schools of Eatonton, 
1894-1900; of Jackson, 1900-02; and Principal of schools in 
Augusta, 1902-11; was Principal of the John Millege School (25 
teachers and 900 pupils) when elected into the State Normal 
bchool faculty; taught Psychology and Pedagogy three years in 
the City Training Class, Mr. Bruce was horn in Franklin and 
reared in Banks County. 

MISS EDNA M. RANDALL. Domestic Science, is a 
graduate of the State Normal School at Milwaukee, and also of 
Stout Institute, the School for Home-makers, the most famous 
school of its sort in the world. She has had nearly nine years 
experience in teaching. Two teachers in this department; proha- 
hly three. 

MISS GERTRUDE E. WOOD, Music Director, is a 
gold medalist of The American Conservatory of Music, Chicago; 
-was for two years a vocalist in the largest Methodist Church in 
that City, under Rohert Boice Carson; was director of Music in 
Ewing College, 111.; has a good voice and ample experience and skill 
in voice culture, glee cluh, chorus work, and orchestra management. 
She will have three assistants for piano and violin teaching. 

MISS KATHERINE G. HERRON, Nashville, Tenn., 

assistant in Music, a graduate of Ward s Seminary, under Drs. 
Vv inkier and Conrad, She has had two years experience in teaching. 

MR. E. SCOTT SELL, Chair of Agriculture, is a grad- 
uate from the four-year course. State College of Agriculture. 
Last year he was husy introducing agriculture into the Richmond 
County Schools; that is to say, husy with the very problem this 
school is trying to solve. Mr. Sell was horn and reared in Jack- 
son County. There are two assistants in this department. 

MISS ANNIE MATTHEWS, Oglethorpe County, 
Assistant in Mathematics, was graduated from the State Normal 
School in 1908; has five years experience in teaching. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 1 3 

MISS EMMA POLLARD, Savannah, Student- Assist- 
ant in the Library, is a graduate or the Chatham High School, ana 
also of the State Normal School, 1911. 

The 1066 volumes added to the Library this year and the 
circulation or nearly 8,000 hooks make three officials necessary. 

MISS ESTELLE POLAND, Jones County, Student- 
Assistant in Physical Culture, is a graduate of the State Normal 
School, 1911, 

The courses in Physical Culture will he greatly extended 
and enriched. The head of this department and her assistant, 
with the Trained Nurse and the four matrons, have direct special 
care of the health and wellbeing of the student body* 

MISS MARY M. WOODS, Henry County, Teacher 
in the Muscogee Elementary School, taught for two years in the 
State Normal School, Glenville, W. Va. Her preparation for 
usefulness was had in Packer Institute, Brooklyn, Havard Sum- 
mer School, George Washington University, Washington, D. C, 
and in travel abroad. She has had thirteen years experience as a 
teacher; last year, in the Atlanta Schools. 

MISS LOUISE HEMINGWAY, Houston County, 
Teacher in the Muscogee Elementary School, came to us from the 
Perry High School, and was graduated from the State Normal 
May, 1911. When elected she was a teacher in the Griffin Pub- 
lic Schools. She has taught two and a half years. 

MISS IRIS CALLAWAY, Oglethorpe County, Teach- 
er in the Muscogee Elementary School, was a student under Supt. 
N. H, Ballard, Brunswick, Ga. She is also a graduate of the 
State Normal School, 1911, She has had five years experience 
as a teacher, 

MISS MARJORIE FORD, Habersham County, Teach- 

er in the Muscogee Elementary School, is a graduate of Pied- 
mont College, and also the State Normal School, 1911, She was 
class president, and also the speaker representing the State Normal 
School on the University of Georgia Commencement program. 
She has had two years experience as a teacher. 



14 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 



GENERAL CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION. 



The purpose of this school is to "educate and train teach- 
ers for the common-schools of Georgia." The terms of ad- 
mission are as follows : 

First : The applicant must be sufficiently mature and suf- 
ficiently well prepared to undertake the work of the School 
successfully. All students, when admitted, are considered 
upon probation for a reasonable length of time ; and, when 
unwilling or unable to do the work required, they will be pri- 
vately counseled to withdraw. 

Second : Good Moral Character. Every student will be 
required to hand to the President a letter of recommendation 
from some responsible party in the home neighborhood. 

Third : A written pledge that the applicant will teach in 
the common-schools of Georgia as long as he or she has en- 
joyed the benefits of this school. 

Fourth : Good Health. This school is delightfully situated 
in the Piedmont hills. The conditions of health here cannot 
be surpassed. We believe there are no neater, tidier school' 
buildings or premises anywhere in the world ; but the School 
is not a health resort, and the applicant who lacks the physi- 
cal stamina necessary to pursue the coure of study satisfacto- 
rily must not seek to enter. 

Fifth : No applicant will be admitted into the School 
who does not bring a letter from the home physician certify- 
in- that the applicant has not been exposed to any contagious 
diseases within the previous thirty days. See blank for this 
purpose on last page. This letter must be presented upon 
arrival. 

Sixth: Successful vaccination is also another absolutely 
necessary condition of entrance. All students whatsoever 
will have their arms examined upon arrival, by a physician; 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 1 5 

and, if they do not have a satisfactory scar, they must be 
vaccinated at once, before they can be admitted into the school, 
(at a cost of fifty cents each.) In all cases it is better for 
applicants to be vaccinated before coming here, provided it 
can be done with fresh, pure, vaccine points. 

These last two conditions are so imperative, and will be adhered 
to so rigidly, that the applicant who neglects them will be necessar- 
ily subjected to great trouble in entering the school. Plainly and 
emphatically, these things must not be neglected by any applicant. 



PARTICULAR DIRECTIONS FOR ENTERING 
THE SCHOOL. 

Read Carefully and Follow Closely. 



LEAVING HOME: REACHING ATHENS. 

1. Have all baggage plainly marked with your name, and 

State Normal School, Athens, Ga. 

2. Arrange to reach Athens in the day time. If this is 
impossible, advise us definitely in time to have you met at 
night. 

3. The school is on the street car line ; as are also the 
Seaboard, the Gainesville Midland, and the Southern Stations. 
A five minutes walk from the Central or the Georgia sta- 
tion brings you to the street car line. The conductors on the 
street cars will tell you how to reach the school. Fare five 
cents. 

4. Do not give your baggage checks to anybody at the 
depot but a representative of the school, and never to a negro 
drayman. 



REGISTERING. 



i. Go to the President's office, till out a registration blank 
pToperly; then surrender this at the office of the Dormitory 



l6 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 

Manager, where you make your deposit of moneys and receive 
your receipt for the same, together with a Dormitory Room 
Ticket. 

2. Write your name on your room ticket and go at once to 
a matron, select your room and choose your roommate. Ours 
is necessarily the miller's rule of "first come, first served." 
The rooms in the Winnie Davis Memorial Hall are filled by 
appointees of the Chapters of the U. D. C. If you are 
to occupy a room in the Winnie Davis, your letter of appoint- 
ment must be in the President's hands by August 31. Send 
it at once ; or bring it when you come. 

3. When you are settled with your trunk in your room, 
then come to the President's office for your Class Entrance 
Card. Bring your letter of introduction, your health certifi- 
cate and your reports from former schools or teachers. Fail- 
ure to read and observe carefully the directions of the cata- 
logue will certainly give you trouble in entering the school 
promptly. 

4. When you have your Class Card, ask any former stu- 
dent to make out your schedule of recitations and your book 
list. Then buy your books in the office of the Dormitory 
Manager at reduced rates. Report to your classes according 
to your schedule, show to the teachers your Class Entrance 
Card, and ask them to enroll your name. Ascertain the les- 
sons for the next day, and then you are ready for the work of 
the session. 

All students are required to register promptly with their 
teacher according to their Class Entrance Cards, and to be set- 
tled down at work promptly after arrival. Only the President 
of the school may make any change in a Class Card. Students 
must register according to these Class Cards and must not 
vary therefrom without the permission of the President. 



Deposit your moneys in the dormitory safe. All moneys 
deposited on personal account can be withdrawn at the will of 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 1 7 

the student. Do not keep loose change in your trunks or lying 
about your rooms. 

We will do our best for your comfort and welfare here; 
but we ask you to help us by following these directions. 



BOARDING DEPARTMENT. 



The school now has four dormitories : Gilmer Hall, Brad- 
well Hall, Winnie Davis Memorial Hall, and Senior Hall (the 
upper floor of the Dining Room Building). We have accom- 
modations for 400 students. All dormitories are now steam- 
heated, with toilet rooms and baths on every floor, abundantly 
supplied with hot and cold water. They are comfortable, 
pleasant, and healthful homes for the students. Students in 
each dormitory are under the care of a resident matron who 
looks after their needs and comforts. Our dining hall is one 
of the best in the state. Board in the dormitories includes 
rooms, table fare, heat, lights, and attendants for the rough 
work. The students wait upon themselves, for the most part. 

Each student will pay for and look after her own launder- 
ing with the assistance of the matron in charge. Laundering 
costs from 25 cents to 40 cents per week, according to the 
number of articles put into the wash. 

Each student must bring a pillow, pillow-cases, bed clothes 
(including at least one white spread), towels, hair brush, and 
other personal toilet articles ; also a bath robe, bed room 
slippers, overshoes, wraps, and umbrella; all of which are 
necessary to the safety and wellbeing of our students. 



THE INFIRMARY. 

MISS ILA W. BROADUS, TRAINED NURSE IN CHARGE. 



This is a small building of four rooms. It has two bath 
rooms, lavatories, and toilets, and electric lights, hot and cold 



l8 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 

water, and a gas range. The furnishings are entirely com- 
fortable. It is a cosy, quiet retreat for students who from 
time to time need such quiet. It is in charge of a trained 
nurse, most of whose time is spent, not in looking after stu- 
dents who are sick, but in caring for them to see that they do 
not get sick. With the matrons she takes general oversight 
and care of the entire student body. The health of the stu- 
dent body has always been superb. 



EXPENSES. 



1. TERMS OF BOARD. 

(Payable in advance as indicated.) 

September 5, 191J — First payment $ 25.00 

November 7, 191 1 — Second payment 25.00 

January 22, 1912 — Third payment 25.00 

March 25, 191 2 — Fourth payment 25.00 

$ico.oo 

2. OTHER EXPENSES. 

(To be paid on entrance, once only each year.) 

Matriculation Fee $ 8.00 

3. BOORS, STATIONERY, ETC. 

This expense varies according to the class. From $5.00 

to 10.00 

Department fees, to cover cost of materials used, from 

50 cents to 4.00 

Total $122.00 

4. INSTRUCTIONS CONCERNING EXPENSE. 

Students who enter before September 5th will be charged 
at the rate of 50 cents per day up to September 5th. 

Board for students who do not make the full quarterly 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 19 

payments, as indicated above, will be at the rate of $3.00 per 
week, or 50 cents per day. 

Students who cannot enter at the regular dates will be re- 
ceived at any time during the session just as their opportunities 
may permit. 

Money deposited on dormitory account cannot be refunded. 

Money deposited on personal account can be withdrawn at any- 
time. 

Pocket money in abundance works harm here as in all 
schools. Students are forbidden to run into debt at the stores. 

Our tables are furnished with the best and most wholesome 
food that can be bought. Our head waiter makes it his busi- 
ness to see that all students are amply supplied. 

Xo reduction will be made in board for students who room 
outside the dormitories and take meals at dining hall ; except 
for the male students, who will pay at the rate of $20.00 per 
quarter for the school year. Payments to be made on same 
dates as specified under head of terms of board. If these pay- 
ments are not made in advance for one quarter, charges will 
be at the rate of $3.00 per week or 50 cents per day. 

The State has not furnished dormitory accomodations 
sufficient for the boys and girls, and the Board of Trustees, 
under these conditions, will reserve the rooms in the dormitories 
for girls only. The young men can secure rooms near the 
campus at reasonable rates. A list of rooms for rent, with 
price of rooms, will be kept on file at the office of the Dormi- 
tory manager. This can be secured if desired. 

There is, of course, no tuition paid by Georgia students. 
Students from outside the State are required to pay S50.00 
a year, in advance, for tuition. 

Students who cannot enter until- after the session begins 
will pay only for the time they are in school, and will be given 
the quarterly rate, provided they pay for nine weeks in ad- 
vance. 

5. KEEPING EXPENSES DOWN. 

When you consider that a dollar in iqii purchases no more 
of the necessities of lite than fifty rent- would do in [900, as 



20 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 

shown by a recent Government report, the expenses of a student 
for a year in this school are unbelievably small. The| 
registration fee, the charges for rooms, table board, light, 
heat, water, telephones, servant hire, laundering, trained nurs- 
ing, library facilities, and what not make altogether a 
total of not more than $125.00 for the nine school months. 
Most of our students go through the year upon a total expense 
like this. This school, with its nine buildings, its seventeen de- 
partments of instruction, and its forty-two officers and teachers, 
offers, for a minimum charge, a maximum of opportunities for 
education and culture. 

6. COLLEGE BOOKSTORE. 

The school authorities buy, at the regular dealers' discounts, 
all books, stationery, and so on, needed by the students. These 
are sold to students at less that the regular retail rates, and 
thus they are saved in the lump a considerable sum of money. 



MORAL AND RELIGIOUS ATMOSPHERE. 



The Y. M. C. A., the Y. W. C. A., the Volunteer Bible 
Classes, the twilight prayer-meetings, the wholesome religious 
and moral atmosphere of the School, taken all together, are a 
revelation and a benediction to new students. 

Perhaps no student body in the world needs fewer rules and 
regulations. The eager, anxious, alert spirit of our students 
is a constant inspiration to every teacher in the Faculty. It 
is rare that a student here does not quickly yield to these 
stimulating influences. A student of improper or unworthy 
spirit, who cannot or does not fall into the humor and temper 
of this noble student body, is quietly counseled to withdraw. 
It ought to be said that there are fewer students of this sort in 
this School than in any other School of our acquaintance. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOG L'K. 21 

BIBLE STUDY COURSES. 



The School is now offering progressive courses in Bible 
Study, which during the student's school life, give an op- 
portunity of studying the Bock from Genesis to Revelation. 
The weekly readings and the weekly quiz follow the course 
outlined and published by Miss Ida A. Young, who for many 
years has been a faithful and efficient teacher in the school. 
The student volunteers to take these courses, or not, as she 
pleases ; but having undertaken them, her recitation work is 
valued as any other work is valued. The results of it are re- 
corded and appear upon the report of the student, and, if 
satisfactorily completed, on her Diploma. About 90 per cent, 
of the student body is doing this work under six teachers of the 
Faculty, who with great interest and enthusiasm have volun- 
teered to help. We think here that a knowledge of the Bible 
is a large part of the training of a worthy teacher. 



NEW CARNEGIE LIBRARY. 



This handsome building, the generous gift of Mr. Andrew 
Carnegie, was planned by Messrs. Peabody and Ludlow, and 
built by Moise de Leon. It is outfitted and furnished in the 
same beautiful taste that the architects have shewn. 

The building has cost nearly $25,000. It was opened Sep- 
tember 6, [9 10, in charge of Miss Agnes Goss, a trained libra- 
rian. Her assistants arc Misses Gibbs and Pollard. 



PURPOSES OF THE SCHOOL. 



We arc training teachers for the common-schools of the 
State, and we arc doing ii with an eye single to this end. For 



22 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 

this reason we are gradually increasing the opportunities for 
academic scholarship here ; and a main part of this work is a 
thorough review of the common-school subjects, with the view 
of teaching them. There are two common-school review 
classes, which teachers may enter at any time during the year 
when they can get away from their schools. The courses 
offered are intensive, not extensive, the aim being thoroughness 
of scholarship. At the same time, there are eight teachers in 
the Faculty who devote themselves to the theory and practice 
of teaching. The Muscogee Elementary school has 143 
children in it, with six teachers and all the grades of common- 
school work. 



COURSES OFFERED. 

The School aims at setting a high-water mark in the train- 
ing of teachers. Georgia's Normal Schools must be just as 
good as the Normal Schools of any other State in the Union. 
For this reason the following courses are offered : The ordin- 
ary Academic Courses ; Common-School Music with chorus 
work; Instrumental Mi/sic ; Voice Culture, and Harmony 
Studies ; Elementary Agriculture ; Domestic Arts and Sciences ; 
Manual Arts ; Physical Culture ; Expression and Correspond- 
ence Courses. 



RELATION OF THE SCHOOL TO THE COM- 
MON-SCHOOLS IN GEORGIA. 



Mure than <jo per cent, of the 9327 pupils who have regis- 
tered here since the founding of the School, have gone back 
to teach in the common-schools in their communities and 
counties. Correspondence witli our graduates discloses the 
fact that rather more than 80 per cent, of them have been 
teaching in the village and rural schools of the State. Every 
dollar appropriated by the Legislature to this school multiplies 






STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 2$ 

many times over the value of every dollar spent in common- 
school education. 



DEMAND FOR TEACHERS. 

The demand on us for teachers is overwhelming. We have 
been called on by letter for 221 teachers since the closing of 
the session of 1910. This school ought to be graduating four 
hundred teachers every year, instead of fifty, and this number 
would be small when we consider that nearly two thousand 
teachers drop out of the common-school corps every year. 
All of this means, of course, that we need more dormitories, 
more academic buildings, more dining-room space, larger 
kitchen facilities. The State can well afford to give us these. 
Xo cotton-mill directors would invest two million dollars in 
an enterprise and then turn it over to raw, untrained help. 
No more ought a State, common sense and business judgment 
considered, invest two million dollars in common-schools, and 
then turn them over to raw, untrained teachers. The time 
has come in Georgia to magnify and dignify, and glorify 
common-school teachers and teaching. Missouri has about 
twice the taxable wealth of Georgia ; but spends annually 
nearly twenty-five times as much for the training of teachers 
for her common-schools. 



GROWTH OF THE SCHOOL. 



In the last ten years the Faculty has grown from nine 
teachers to thirty-nine, or more than 430 per cent. We began 
fifteen years ago with one building, the old Rock C >llege, 
which served as dormitory, dining-room, kitchen. President's 
cottage, and recitation rooms. There are now eight brick 
buildings, together with three small new wooden buildings. 
Toward this development in buildings, the State has contrib- 



24 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 

nted only $46,500. Generous friends have contributed, in ad- 
dition, $125,000. 



THE UNOFFICIAL LIFE OF THE SCHOOL. 



All students know, of course, that a very large part of the 
value of student life comes out of the part of it which they 
themselves originate and control. The student organizations 
here have been founded, in every instance, upon the noblest 
of purposes. We have no Greek-letter societies ; but we 
do have efficient Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. C. A. organizations; 
Volunteer Bible Study classes; the Millie Rutherford Liter- 
ary Society ; the Altioria Literary Society ; the Jeffersonian 
Literary Society; the Athletic Association; tennis clubs; 
basket-ball clubs; and last (I had almost said best of all) the 
Saturday Xight Round Tables, the Earnest Boys' Club, and 
the Alexander Etiquette Club. These are all wholesome, 
valuable features of the resident school life here. It is inspir- 
ing to see how quickly new students come into the noble pur- 
poses of this student body. The student of unworthy or im- 
proper spirit is exceedingly rare here. W.e are not concerned 
with students who study too little. Such students are not 
here and do not stay here very long. A nagging, never-end- 
ing anxiety is the protection of our students against overwork. 

The Young Georgia Club is a new and unique organiza- 
tion in the School. It is composed of ioo students and faculty 
members, who meet regularly on Mondays at noon for an 
hours informal, comfortable discussion of vital topics. This 
year the time has been spent upon a study of Rural Life Con- 
ditions: signs of decay 3 signs of progress; causes and con- 
sequences ; curative and reparative remedies. One hundred 
and eighteen counties of Georgia are represented in the student 
body this year. The detailed studies and reports of conditions 
in our State have yielded a body of valuable and stimulating 
information. The rising fever and fervor of patriotic citizen- 
ship in this club is inspiring and helpful. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 25 

THE CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL. 



There are many teachers who need a higher grade of 
license and a better preparation for teaching, who cannot af- 
ford to attend this or any other school. 

In ovder to help these teachers, a correspondence school 
was established here two years ago. The new year obliges us 
to enlarge our facilities. The work of our correspondents will 
pass the inspection of the various members of our Faculty, who 
will enter proper credits for the work done, and such credits will 
be recognized whenever the correspondents enter this school. 
Special circulars will be sent to all who apply for information 
concerning these Correspondence Courses. Charges are 
moderate. Address all communications to E. C. BRANSON, 

President State Normal School, Athens, Ga. 



GRADUATE STUDENTS. 



The following schools are this year represented by gradu- 
ates in the student body of the State Normal School : Tugalo 
Institute, Woman's College, S. C, Lucy Cobb Institute, Glynn 
Academy, Martin Institute, Ga. Normal and Business Insti- 
tute, Pierce Institute, State Normal School, Piedmont College, 
Middle Georgia Institute, Banks-Stephens Institute, Euharlee 
Industrial School, Young Harris, Colby College. Me., Sparks 
Collegiate Institute, Locust Grove Institute. Southern Normal 
Institute, James Sprunt Institute. John Means Institute, 
Andrew College, Centenary College, Joseph K. Johnston In- 
stitute, Muscogee Elementary School, Hamilton College, 
Griffin District Institute. Palmer Institute. St. Joseph Acad- 
emy; and the High Schools <>!' Chipley, Oconee, Winterville, 
Fairburn, Plains, Griffin, Madison, Austell, La\vrenee\ille. 
1 lawkinsville, Cairo. Covington, Royston, Adrian. Graves, 
Temple, Rome, Elberton. Commerce, Social Circle. Savannah. 
Girard, Ashburn, Gainesville, Lumber City, Rock Spring, 



26 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 

Winder, Athens, Rutledge, Eton, Monticello, Deorun, Ameri- 
cus, Blakely, Villa Rica, Statesboro, Conyers, Colquitt, Bluff- 
ton, Columbus, Chattahoochee, Cochran, Jackson County, Tig- 
nail, Cordele, Greensboro, Eatonton, Cornelia, Carnesville. 



STATISTICS FOR 1910-11, 



Students registered during the session to date (April 13) 
191 1, 653; pupils in Muscogee Elementary School, 143; total 
enrollment, 796; applicants turned away from lack of room, 
47 ; teachers and officers, 42 ; counties represented by students, 
122; students holding diplomas from other schools 153; stu- 
dents holding first-grade licenses, 70 ; second-grade licenses, 
99; third-grade licenses, 49; students having experience in 
teaching, 18S. Students who earned the money they spend 
here 192. Sixty-five per cent, of all our students are the sons 
and daughters of farmers. Calls on us for teachers, 1910-11, 
221. Total registration since the founding of the school, 9,327; 
more than 90 per cent, of whom have since tanght in our com- 
mon-schools. Total graduates to June, 1910, 524. Grad- 
uating class this year numbers eighty-five. 

Buildings: Academic buildings. 3; Dormitory build- 
ings. 3; Dining Hall building and Senior Hall, 1; Carnegie 
Library, 1 ; Infirmary. 1 ; Dairy Barn, 1. Total, 10. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 



27 




The Regulation I'niform of the State Norma! School 



28 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 



The coat suit can be bought here for $15.50, including 
the cap. 

The shirt waist, collar, tie and gloves will cost $2.25 in 
addition; or $17.75 m a ^- 

If the student wishes to make her own shirt waist she can 
buy the material here at wholesale price, and get the pattern 
free of charge. A descriptive order blank will be mailed from 
the President's office upon application. 

This uniform was adopted by request of the student body, 
in order to lessen the expenses of dress. 

The suit is wool storm serge, satin lined. Its wearing 
qualities are guaranteed. It is fitted without extra charge. 

The students may wear this uniform, or not, as she chooses. 




Shirtwaist, S. N. S. Special. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 2Q 



OUTLINE OF COURSES OFFERED. 



(The figures indicate the number of lessons per week). 



I. THE COMMON-SCHOOL REVIEW CLASS. 



A One-Year Course, Beginning September 4 and Closing May 27. 



REQUIRED SUBJECTS. 

Grammar . . . 3 Physiology 2 

Spelling 1 Geography ... ... 2 

Literature . 2 Agriculture 2 

Expression 2 Arithmetic 4 



U. S. History 
Ga. History ' 

Civics 



Penmanship ... . 1 

Physical Culture (2) 



Total 22 

Optional Subjects, at the discretion of the President: 
Professional Text-books prescribed by the State School Com- 
missioner, 3 ; or Drawing, 2 ; or Music, 2 ; or Latin, 3. 

Teachers holding only a second or third grade license 
will take the above required course ;. the whole of it, or such 
part of it as i^ being given during the limited time they may 
have to pursue it here. 

Applicants who d 1 not have a license t • teach will be sub- 
jected to examination upon entrance, or required to ^h«>w 
satisfactory report- from former teachers. 

Students may enter this class at any time during the session. 



3° 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 



II. THE COxMMON-SCHOOL TRAINING CLASS 



A One-Year Course, Beginning September 4 and Closing May 27. 



REQUIRED SUBJECTS. 



Psychology 

PRINCIPLES AND METHODS OF 
TEACHING : 

English, from Sept. 4 to Oct. 10 
Reading, from Oct. 10 to Nov. 7 
History, from Nov. 7 to Dec. 11 
Geography, from Dec. 11 to Feb. 6 
Physiology, from Feb. 6 to Mar. 12 
Arithmetic, from Mar. 12 to Apr. 16 
Agriculture, from Apr. 16 toMay29 
Observation under guidance in 
the Practice School, followed 
by conference discussions. 



Organization and Manage- 
ment of Schools 1 

Literature and Expression. 4 



Optional : 
Agriculture and Nature 

Study . 

Common -School Music . 

Manual Arts 

Domestic Science 



r 8 



Subjects chosen from the | 
two lower Diploma classes j 
Physical Culture (2) 

Total 25 



Teachers holding a first-grade license or a life license, 
may undertake this course, and upon a satisfactory completion 
of the same will receive a Common-School Training Certifi- 
cate. 

This course has also been designed for the Country-School 
Commissioners who desire greater knowledge and efficiency 
in leadership. They are invited to enter this class at any time 
and to stay as long as possible. They will not be required to 
pay the usual registration fee of eight dollars. 

This is a new course, and is offered this year for the first 
time. There arc many teachers in Georgia, holding first grade 
licenses, who cannot take the Diploma Courses, but who can 
take the One- Year Certificate Course with great profit. Many 
of them arc already teaching in the country schools and are 
near to the country school problem. Hence the interest of the 
school in them, and this offer of the school to help then into 
larger preparation for usefulness. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 

III. ENGLISH DIPLOMA COURSE 



3 1 



Students at present in the school and former students are allowed 
to take the old three-year course, as here outlined; provided they 
enter and complete it by June 1, 1914. 



DIPLOMA A. 

This Course Will Not be Offered After June 1, 1912. 

REQUIRED SUBJECTS. 



FIRST HALF-YEAR. 

English Composition 4 

Algebra 4 

Physics 4 

Botany and Entomology 4 

Expression 2 

Literature 2 

Physical Culture (2) 

Total 20 






SECOND HALF-YEAR. 

Literature 4 

Physical Geography 4 

A lgebra 4 

Physics 4 

English History 4 

Physical Culture. (2) 

Total 20 



Optional Subjects: — Domestic Science, 4; Manual Arts, 
4: Music: Piano, Voice, Harmony, 2 each; Common-School 
Music, 3: Latin, 3; Greek, 3; French, 2: German. 2. 

The total number of lessons must not exceed 25 per week. 



• 



DIPLOMA B 

This Course Will Not be Offered After J 

REQUIRED SUBJECTS. 



FIRST HALF-YEAR. 

Rhetoric . 3 

Expression __. . 1 

Literature 2 

Geometry ... 4 

General Historj 4 

Agriculture ind School 

Gardening... 2 

Chemistry ... . ... 2 

Nature Study 2 

Physical Culture (2) 



SECOND HALF-YEAR. 

History of Education 3 

Psychology 4 

Methods 

Expression 1 

Geometry 4 

Chemistry 4 

Agriculture and School 

Gardening 2 

Physical Culture. (2 ) 



Total 



Jo 



Total 



J(» 



< M'iic.\\i. Subjects: — Domestic Science, 4; Manual An 



32 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 



4 ; Music : Piano, Voice, Harmony, 2 each ; Common-School 
Music, 3; Latin, 3; Greek, 3; French, 2; German, 2. 

The total number of lessons must not exceed 25 per week. 



DIPLOMA C. 

This Course Will Not be Offered After June 1, 1914. 

REQUIRED SUBJECTS. 



FIRST HALF-YEAR. 

Reviews and Methods in : 

Grammar 2 

Geography 2 

Arithmetic 3 

History 3 

Physiology ______ 2 

General Literature 2 

Trigonometry 3 

School Gardening 2 

Nature Studv 1 

Physical Culture (2) 

Total 20 



SECOND HALF-YEAR. 

Child Study 4 

Principles of Education 2 

School Management and 

Supervision ._. 2 

Practice Teaching and 

Methods 8 

Conference 2 

Expression 2 

Physical Culture (2) 



Tctal 



20 



Optional Subjects: — Domestic Science, 4; Manual Arts, 
4 ; Music : Piano, Voice, Harmony, 2 each ; Common-School 
Music, 3 ; Latin, 3 ; Greek, 3 ; French, 2 ; German, 2. 

The total number of lessons must not exceed 25 per week. 



IV. OPTIONAL COURSES. 

1. LATIN: A four-year course, three periods a week. 
Miss Young, teacher. 

2. GREEK : A two-year course, in Diploma A. and B. 
classes, three periods a week. Miss Sprout, teacher. 

3. FRENCH: A three-year course, in Diploma A., B., 
and C. classes, two periods a week. Prof. Lustrat, teacher. 

4. GERMAN: A three-year course, in Diploma A., B., 
and C. classes, two periods a week. Miss Sprout, teacher. 

5. MANUAL ARTS: A four-year course, four periods 
a week. Also a special two-year course for graduate students. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. $$ 

Mr. Orr and Miss Linton, teachers. Fee. covering cost of 
bocks and materials, $2.50 per year. Apply for special Bulle- 
tin. 

6. DOMESTIC ARTS and SCIENCE: A three-year 
course, four periods a week. Misses Randall and Hill, teachers. 
Fees, covering cost of materials, $2.00 per year. Apply for 
special Bulletin. 

7. MUSIC: Piano: Violin. Voice, Harmony, three-year 
courses, 2 lessons per week. Fee, $4.75 per month ; or $37.50 
cash in advance. Misses Wood, Hardy, Hodgson and Herron, 
teachers. Fees when once paid cannot be refunded. 

8. COMMOX-SCHOOL MUSIC: A three-year course, 
three periods a week. Open to all without cost. 



ENGLISH DIPLOMA COURSE. 



This course comes to an end June I, 1914. Until this date, 
it is open only to former students of this school who are 
already in way of graduation. 



CONDITIONS OF ENTRANCE. 



1. A first-grade license, or a life license to teach in Geor- 
gia, will admit the applicant into the Diploma A Class of the 
English Diploma Course, without examination. Licenses musl 
be presented to the President upon arrival. 

2. Those who elect Diploma A work in Latin must have 
completed Collar &• Daniell's First Year Latin Book (or its 
equivalent. 

3. A student admitted into the English Diploma Course 
may stand examinations upon any subject in this course, and 
take Diploma B Class work in these subjects, or substitute 
other advanced subjects, provided the total number of recita- 



34 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 

tions does not exceed twenty-five a week. Every opportunity 
will be offered capable students of going on toward gradua- 
tion as far and as fast as their abilities will carrv them. 



ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS. 



i. For entrance into the Review Classes: Saturday be- 
fore the opening of the Fall Session, 9 o'clock a. m. 

2. For entrance into the Diploma A Class : Monday be- 
for the opening of the Fall Session, 9 o'clock a. m. 

3. For entrance into the Diploma B Class : Tuesday, the 
opening day of the session, 3 o'clock p. m. 

4. For Conditioned Students : Tuesday, the opening day 
of the session, 3 o'clock p. m. 

All examinations are held in the Schood Auditorium build- 
ing, and begin promptly at the hours named. 

Applicants must not fail to be on hand upon the days and 
at the hours specified for them. The crowd of students here 
is too great and the work of organization too exacting to give 
examinations promptly to students who come later than the 
day regularly set for their examinations. 



CHOICE OF COURSES. 



All courses will be chosen by the student in consultation 
with the President of the School ; and when a course is 
chosen, no change can be made without consent of the Facul- 
ty. Students cannot be permitted to take up or lay down 
studies at will. 

Students that are put on probation will be privately coun- 
seled to withdraw from the School as soon as it becomes evi- 
dent that they are unwilling or unable to do the work re- 
quired. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 35 

CERTIFICATE FOR COMPLETION OF SPECIAL 

SUBJECTS. 



Well-prepared students, upon permission of the Faculty, 
may specialize in two or more departments (a number less 
than the full number covered by a Diploma), and may win 
certificates of completion, upon satisfactory examinations. 



IRREGULAR COURSES 



Students wishing to select irregular or special courses will 
be allowed the privilege, provided they board outside of the 
school dormitories, or take at least 18 periods of recitation 
work a week. These courses will be arranged by the Presi- 
dent, in consultation with the students. Such courses may 
be altered or denied later by the Faculty, as deemed best for 
the student. 



DIPLOMAS. 



The student who takes the Engli>ii Diploma Course, and 
one or more of the optional courses, may earn an English- 
Latin diploma, or an English-French diploma, and so on. 

Every diploma will state specifically the subjects or de- 
partments from which the student has been graduated. 



V. ONE-YEAR DIPLOMA COURSE 



This course is offered (i) to graduates of four-year. Uni- 
versity-accredited high schools, provided they have first-grade 
licenses and at least seven months' experience in teaching; 
(2) to graduates of Colleges, offering more than fourteen 



units for graduation. 



36 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 

Admission to this Course is not restricted to former stu- 
dents of this school. 

REQUIRED SUBJECTS. 

FIRST HALF-YEAR. SECOND HALF-YEAR. 

History of Education 3 Child Study 4 

Psychology 4 Principles of Education 2 

Methods . 2 School Management and 

Nature Study 2 Supervision.. .2 

School Cardering.. 3 Practice Teaching and 

Manual Arts or Domestic Methods ... 

Science 4 Conference 2 

Physical Culture (2) Agriculture and School 

Gardening . 2 

Total 18 Manual Arts, or Domestic 

Science 4 

Physical Culture (2) 

Total ...21 

One Option : Total lessons not to exceed 25 a week. 



VI. TWO-YEAR DIPLOMA COURSE 

This course is offered to graduates of University-accredited 
high schools, having four year courses. Graduates having 
less than a four-year high-school course will not be admitted 
to this course. 

This course covers: (1) Subjects not usually included in 
the academic high-school courses or subjects not fully or 
adequately treated in the high-schools; (2) Subjects consider- 
ed here as necessary preparation for progressive, efficient teach- 
ing ; and ( 3) Subjects absolutely necessary for successful 
work by the student in the practice teaching of the Senior 
year. 

The applicant for this course must present to the Presi- 
dent before September I. (1) her diploma, (2) a catalogue 
of the school from which she was graduated, (3) an official 
record of her standing in the various studies during her last 

year in school. Every year applicants waste time needlessly be- 
cause they neglect to bring the data herein called for. They cannot 
be classified without it. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 



37 



Admission to this course is not restricted to former stu- 
dents of this school. 



First Year of the Course. 



FIRST HALF-YEAR. 

Expression, A and B 3 

Chemistry, B 4 

Agriculture and School 

Gardening, B 2 

Botany and Entomology, A_. 4 

Nature Study 2 

Manual Arts or Domestic 

Science 4 

Physical Culture (2) 

Total 19 



SECOND HALF -YEAR. 

Psychology, B 4 

Methods, B 2 

History of Education, B 3 

Chemistry, B 4 

Expression, B 1 

Agriculture and School 

Gardening __.._ 2 

Manual Arts or Domestic 

Science 4 

Physical Culture ... (2) 

Total 20 

4 ; Manual Arts, 4 ; Music : 



Options : Domestic Science, 
Piano, Voice, Harmony, 2 ; Latin, 3 ; Greek, 3 ; French, 2 
German, 2. Total lessons not to exceed 25 per week. 



Second Year of the Course. 



FIRST HALF-YEAR. 

Reviews and Methods in : 

Grammar 2 

Geography 2 

Arithmetic 3 

History 3 

Physiology 2 

Nature Study 1 

General Literature 2 

Trigonometry 3 

School Gardening 2 

Physical Culture (2) 



SECOND HALF-YEAR. 

Child Study 4 

Principles of Education 2 

School Management and 

Supervision _. 2 

Practice Teaching and 

Methods 8 

Conference . 2 

Expression 2 

Physical Culture (2 ) 

Total 20 



Total 20 

Options: Domestic Science, 4; Manual Arts, 4; Music: 
Piano, Voice, Harmony, 2; Latin, 3; Greek, 3; French, 2; 
German, 2. Total lessons not to exceed 25 per week. 



38 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 

THE NEW FOUR-YEAR DIPLOMA COURSE 



Former students of this school, eligible for Freshman class 
work, may enter Diploma A class of the old three-year course. 
(See pages 30-1). 

New students eligible for Freshman class work must take 
the first vear of the four-year course as outlined below. 



1 Freshman Class Course. 

(Given for the first time 1911-12.) 

Required Subjects: 

English Composition 2 

American Literature 2 

Expression 2 

History Western Europe 2 

Algebra and Observa- 
tional Geometry 5 

Physiography and Eco- 
nomic Geography 3 

General Agriculture... 3 

Physical Culture (2) 

Total lessons per week. _. 20 

OPTIONAL SUBJECTS: 

Latin (3), Greek (3), French 
(2), German (2), Domestic Sci- 
ence (4), Manual Arts (4), Mu- 
sic: Piano, Voice, Harmony 
(2) each, Common School Mu- 
sic (3). 

Total recitations per week 
must not exceed 25. 



2. Sophomore Class Course. 

(Given for the first time 1912-13). 

Required Subjects: 

Rhetoric 2 

English Literature 2 

Expression 2 

Geographical Influences 

in American History 

(1st half-year) . 4 

Botany and Economic 

Zoology (2d ha'f year) 4 

Physics .... 4 

Geometry . 4 

Psychology 3 

Physical Culture (2) 

Total lessons per week 21 

OPTIONAL SUBJECTS: 

Latin (3), Greek (3), French 
(2), German (2). Domestic Sci- 
ence (4), Manual Arts (4) Mu- 
sic : Piano, Voice, Harmony 
(2 each), Common -School Mu- 
sic (3). 

Total recitations per week 
must not exceed 25. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 



39 



3. Junior Class Course. 

(Given for the first time 1913-14) 

REQUIRED SUBJECTS: 
English: Theme work 

and Grammar Reviews 2 

English Literature 2 

Expression.. 2 

Civics (1st half year) 4 

Agriculture (2d half year) _._ 4 
Chemistry 4 

Geometry and Arithmetic 

Reviews 4 

History of Education and 

Methods 3 

Physical Culture (2 ) 

Total recitations per week. . 21 

OPTIONAL SUBJECTS: 
Latin (3). Greek (3), French 
(2), German (2), Domestic Sci- 
ence (4), Manual Arts (4), Mu- 
sic: Piano, Voice, Harmony (2) 
each, Common-School Music 
(3). 

Total recitation per week 
must not exceed 25. 



4. Senior Class Course. 

(Given for the first time 1914-15). 

REQUIRED SUBJECTS: 

General Literature 1 

Expression 2 

Trigonometry 3 

History Reviews (1st 

half-year) 4 

Physiology Reviews (2d 

half-year) 2 

Rural Economics (2d half- 
year) 2 

School Gardening. 2 

Child Study 2 

Principles cf Education 

(1st half-year) 2 

Organization and Man- 
agement (2d half-year) 2 

Practice Teaching and 

Conferences... 4 

Physical Culture .(2) 

Total recitations per week . 20 

OPTIONAL SUBJECTS: 
Latin (3), Greek (3), French 
(2), German (2), Domestic Sci- 
ence (4), Manual Arts (4), Mu- 
sic: Piano, Voice, Harmony (2) 
each, Coramon-Sohool Music 
(3). 

Total recitations per week 
must not exceed 25. 



4Q 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 



ROLL OF STUDENTS, SESSION 1910-11. 



REVIEW B CLASS. 



Aycock, D. M. . . 


. Jenkins 


Armstrong, Ruby . 


. Pulaski 


Bozeman, Janie . . 


. . Tift 


Brown, Golden . . 


Madison 


Brown, Beulah . . 


. Greene 


Brown, Gertrude . 


. Tattnall 


Browning, Austin . 


. Telfair 


Bradley, Nell . . . 


. . Hart 


Browning, Alex. . . 


. Telfair 


Brewer, Mabel . . 


. . Elbert 


Bowen. Augustus . 


. Wilcox 



Carswell, Mattie . . Emanuel 
Callahan, Sadie , . . Greene 
Clark, Marietta . Oglethorpe 
Cheshire, Carrie Mae. Fulton 



Coleman, Nova . 
Conway, Prentiss 
Cole, Grady . . . 
Coile, Nezzie . . 
Carithers, Alma . 
Chandler, Olivia . 
Crawford, Bertha 
( llaxton, Sarah . , 
( llaxton, Nellie . . 
Clower, Rosa Lee 

Davis, Myrtis . . 



. Jackson 
. Clarke 

Paulding 
. Clarke 
. Elbert 

. Jackson 
Franklin 

, . Burke 
. Burke 

. Houston 

. Fayette 



Dismuke, Janie . . . Webster 
Daniel, Marion . . . .Clarke 
Driggers, G. R. . . . Bulloch 

Evans, Carrie . . Oglethorpe 

Eve, Willie Burke 

Everett, Mary .... Henry 

Gaines, Late Hart 

Gilstrap, Ruth .... Milton 
Gober, Elizabeth . . .Dawson 

Hammock, Mary Lou . Jones 
Heard, May ..... Wilkes 
Hawkins, Gertrude . . . Hall 

Hill, Rebecca Wilkes 

Hutchins, Thomas . Gwinnett 
Harris, Jimmie . . . Murray 
Harris, Mamie . . Crawford 

Ivey, Eugenia .... DeKalb 
Ivey, Georgia . . . DeKalb 



Justus. Carlton 



Rabun 



Kent. Gooley .... Jenkins 

Kirby, Julia Fannin 

Key, Lou Verne . Meriwether 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 
REVIEW B CLASS (Continued). 



41 



Landrum, Eva . . 


. . Fulton 


Plunket. Mabel . . 


. DeKalb 


Lee, Katie .... 


. . Dodge 


Poindexter. Jennie. 


Randolph 


Logan. F. M. . . . 


. Jackson 


Peterson, Lillie Ma;\ 


r . Clarke 


Logan, Maude . . 


. Jackson 










Rusk, Xora .... 


. Fulton 


McLeroy. Ruth . 


. Clarke 






McLeroy, Emma . 


. . Clarke 


Sherrod. Hattie . . 


. Thomas 


Manry, Mary B. . 


. Calhoun 


Selph. Burie L. . . 


. Brooks 


Mincey, Annie . . 


. Bulloch 


Smith. Mattie . . . 


. Jasper 


Mason, Emily . . 


. . Clarke 


Steele. Etheldra . Meriwether 


Moore, Lillian . . 


. Jackson 










Thompson. Lillie . 


. Tattnall 


Morris, Annie . . . 




Tison. R. H. . . 


. Bulloch 


Newton. Hattie R. 


. Screven 


Thompson, J. IT. . 


. Madison 


Odnm. Aline . . 


. . Burke 


Waldropj Calvin . 


. Clarke 


Odell, .Mary . . . . 


Chattooga 


Wat kins. Grady . . 


. Talbot 






Wheeler, Sadie . . 


. Warren 


Perry. .Mary . . . 


. . Fulton 


Williamson, Helen. 


. Clarke 


Peterman, Ida May 


. Mitchell 


Whitehead, Daisy . 


. Clarke 


Pickerell, Gertrude 


. . Clarke 


Wdls. Bessie . . . 


Franklin 



REVIEW C CLASS. 



Amis. Janie . . . 


. Coweta 


Bellah, Artie . . . 


. Henry 


Balkcom, Louise. . 


Quitman 


fcurkhalter, Bertha 


. Tattnall 


Bell, Lucy .... 


. . Butts 


Jrown, I lassie . . 


Franklin 


Beasley, Nannie . 


.Bulloch 


>riti. Essie .... 


. Berrien 


Bishop, Lee . . . . 


Campbell 


fcurgamy, Alma . . 


Bancoek 


Blanchard, Gerl ru< 


e . . 


MMinett. Eloise . . 


. Jackson 




Columbia 


-. Eunice . . 


. Jackson 


Bussey, Sarah . . 


. Lincoln 


3oynton, Lizzie . . 


. Mitchell 


Brooks, Delia . . . 


( rwinnetl 


llackburn, Stella . 


Emanuel 


Blanchard, Fannie 


Columbia 


Burkhalter, J. L. . 


. Tattnall 



42 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 
REVIEW C CLASS (Continued). 



Bethea, Maggie . 


. . Wilcox 


Greene, Ethel . . 


. Troup 


Barksdale, Sara . 


. Hancock 


Garrett, Erne . . . 


. Milton 


Brooks, Bertha . 


Gwinnett 


Gober, Pearl .... 


. Dawson 


Blair, Kittie Lee 


. Douglas 










Harden, Eliza . . 


. Laurens 


Cadwell, Daisy . 


. Wilcox 


Hardy, Annie L. . 


Franklin 


Cadwell, Beryl . 


. Wilcox 


Haynes, India . . 


. . Hall 


Clark, Mrs. Pearl 


Whitfield 


Heard, Clifford . . 


. Houston 


Chestnut, Eunice 


. Coweta 


House, Grace . . 


. Jackson 


Cooper, Alma . . 


. Walton 


Hughes, Penelope 


. Forsyth 


Camp, Willie . . 


Gwinnett 


Harvil, Mallia . . 


Jackson 


Conner, Mineola . 


. .Walton 


Head, May .... 


. Colquitt 


Coleman, Gary . . 


. Toombs 


Higlmote, Pearl . . 


. Marion 


Clanton, May . . 


. Tattnall 


Holden, Clyde . . 


. Rabun 


Cowart, Louella . 


. Tattnall 


Hilliard, Mary . . 


. . Hart 


Carleton, Ruby . 


. . Troup 


Harris, Pearl . . . 


Gwinnett 


Clark, Cornelia . 


. Jefferson 






Cox, Etta .... 


Cherokee 


Ivey, Mary .... 


. Lincoln 


Cox, Bessie . . . 


. . Troup 


Ivey, Hattie . . . 


. Lincoln 


Cook, Ghittie . . . 


. . Butts 










Kimsey, Florence. Habersham 


Dill, Grace . . . 


. Lincoln 






Dyer. Myrtle . . 


. Warren 


.McDonald, Luna M 


ay. Miller 


Denney, William . 


. . Heard 


McGlamry, Sallie . 


. Worth 


Denney, N. E. . . 


. . Carroll 


McEarchern, Lizzie 


. Fayette 


Davidson, Florrie 


. . Jasper 


McKee, Annie . . 


. Dawson 


Daniel. Lilah . . . 


. Marion 


McGarily, Annie R. 


. Jackson 






McDaniel, Artie . 


. DeKalb 


Eavenson, Mearle . 


. . Elberi 






Eavenson, Alva . . 


. . Elbert 


.Moats, Mattie Lou 


. Worth 


Endsley, Cord . . 


. . Cobb 


Malcomb, Grady . . 


. Wallon 






Mitcham, Ethel . 


Fayette 


Fleming, Nora . . 


. .Coweta 


Moore, Sara .... 


. Elberi 


Fordham, Louernia 


. Bulloch 


Miller, -Jessie . . . 


. Clayton 


Foreman, Floy . . 


. Thomas 


Maddox, Quillian . 


. . Pike 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 43 

REVIEW C CLASS (Continued), 



Means, Lucy . . 


. . . Pike 


Reid, Pierce . . . 


. Carroll 


Mattox, Irene . . 


. . Coweta 










Salmon. Ruth . . 


. . Floyd 


Noel, Annie Sue 


Oglethorpe 


Seagraves, Naomi 


. Madison 


Nash, Geo. W. . 


. Gwinnett 


Sherrod. Mary . . 


. Thomas 


Norman, Cleo . 


. . "Wilkes 


Simonton, Mattie . 


Spalding 






Smith, Susie . . . 


. Calhoun 


Parrish, Mary . 


. . Bulloch 


Summerour. Ethel 


. Walton 


Patterson, Eleaser . Emanuel 


Short. Grady . . . 


Campbell 


Payne, Genie . . 


. Franklin 


Sanders, F. R. . . 


Haralson 


Persons, Emmie 


. . Upson 


Summerlin. Inez . 


Haralson 


Pinson, Willie . . 


. . Gilmer 






Page, Mattie . . . 


. Cherokee 


Taylor. W. E. . . 


. . Milton 


Powell, Addie . 


Washington 






Plunket, Ida . . 


. . DeKalb 


Veale, Mamie . Washington 


Paine, Sarah . . 


.. . Clarke 






Paschal, Lucy . . 


. Columbia 


Wasner, Margaret 


. Houston 






Whitaker, Levicy 


Payette 


Rhodes, Adelaide 


. . . Hall 


Williams, Helen 11. 


. Screven 


Renfroe, Jimmie. 


Washington 


Wilson, Lillie . . 


Franklin 


Robertson, Grace 


. Whitfield 


Wheat, Pearl . . 


. Douglas 



DIPLOMA A CLASS. 



Adams. Montez . . . .Twiggs 


Brantley, -lillie . . .Screven 


Amason, Ophelia . . Wilkes 


Branch, Elizabeth . Oconee 


Arthur, Mary . . . Clarke 


Bryant, Lillian . , . Fulton 




Brackett, Mittie . . Clarke 


Barefield, Loraine . . Burke 


Brown, Emily . . . Hancock 


Barnett, Bonnie K. . Murray 


Bourn, .Mary .... Ware 


Bannester, Lucile. Richmond 


Burson, Bob . . . . Walton 


Bacon, Sara . . Oglethorpe 


Brook, Olive .... Clark.' 


Berry, Addie . . Oglethorpe 


Balkcom, Inez . . . Quitman 


Brack, .Mamie .... Burke 


Bowden, B. . . Meriwether 


Brantley, Buena . . Screven 


Burson, Freda .... Clarke 



44 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 
DIPLOMA A CLASS (Continued). 



Carter, Helen .... Cobb 

Clegg, Joel Walton 

Commander, Fannie . Terrell 
Crozier, Lizzie B. . Quitman 
Cubbedge, Lucile. Effingham 
Cherry, May Belle . . Fulton 
Clarke, Annie Maud . Dodge 
Clarke, Wray . . . Whitfield 
Combess, Lollis . . . Twiggs 

Cooper, Ina Clarke 

Cartee, Eos well . . Bulloch 
Cannon, Nellie-Chattahoochee 
Carter. Liny .... Greene 
Culpepper, R. . Chattahoochee 



Hardy, Eula .... Jasper 
Herndon, Fannie . Stephens 
Highsmith, Dollie . Tattnall 
Hollingsworth, Mary . Newton 
Home, Laura . . . Baldwin 
Hughes, Estelle . . . Floyd 
Hawkins, Freddie M. . Hall 
Holliday, Mary . . Jackson 
Hubbard, Cora . . . Dawson 
Hart, Dorothy . . . Clarke 

Jackson, Ella .... Crisp 
Jones, Lucile .... Mitchell 
Jennings, Elizabeth . Clarke 



Cubbedge. M. . . 


. Chatham 


Johnson, Jimmie . 


Jackson 






Jones, Callie . . 


Dawson 


Dunn, Waudie . 


. Hancock 






Durham, Annie May. Greene 


King, Wren . . . 


. Rabun 


Dyer, Waunetta . 


. Warren 


Kilgore, Allene . . 


. Jackson 


Davant, Hortense 


. . Taylor 


Kingsley, Lena . . 


. Brooks 


Davis, May Belle . 


Taliaferro 


Knight, Myrtle . . 


. Morgan 


Dickson, Ora . . 


. Morgan 


Kent. Alice .... 


Gwinnett 


Drinkard, Lila . 


. Lincoln 


Kennedy, Ruby . Washington 


Drinkard, Ruby . 


. Lincoln 










Langford, Pearl . 


. Greene 


Fulwood. Helen . 


. Houston 






Find ley. Nebraska . .Mi It on 


McCants, Hugh . . 


. Taylor 






McMichael, Nannie 


. DeKalb 


Greer, Stella . . 


. Newton 


McClesky, Emma . 


. Cobb 


dull. Edith . . . 


. Hancock 


.MeFvoy. Louise . . 


. Clarke 


Garbett, Frances 


. . Clarke 


Martin, Gertrude . 


. Clarke 


Gresham, Nannie 


. . Fulton 


Meeks. Charles . . 


. Coffee 


Garland, Annie . 


. Stephens 


Miers, Annie . . . 


. Sumter 


Gillen, Ruby . . 


Oglethorpe 


Malcomb, Eula . . 


. Oconee 


Gresham, Lucile 


. Wilkes 


.Mansfield. Allie M. 


Calhoun 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 



45 



DIPLOMA A CLASS (Continued' 



Morris. Sarah . 
Meadow. R. M. 
Mercer. Rosa . 



. . Fulton 
Oglethorpe 
. . . Jones 



Norris, Mary Lee . . Morgan 
Nicholson. Mvrtie L.. Oconee 



Oxford. Mamie 
Osterman, F. J. 



. Morgan 
Charlton 



Powell, Lizzie .... Lincoln 
Patterson, Elizabeth . Crisp 



Roberts, Florine . 


. . Jones 


Rogers, Flora . . 


. . Polk 


Roach, Ruby . . 


. . Oconee 


Ryder, Janet . . . 


. . Clarke 


Reid, Tassie . . . 


. Haralson 


Robinson, Vallie. 


. Johnson 



Sasser, T. J Grady 

Speights. Alice . . . Baldwin 
Simpson. Alary . . . Greene 



Stevenson. Edna L.. Franklin 
Stokely. Jimmie . . . Cobb 
Smith. Margie .... Clarke 
Strother. H Lincoln 



Talton. Laura . 
Thornton. Kate 
Towns. Martha 

Vickerv. Mar . 



. Houston 
Spalding 
. Clarke 

. Lincoln 



Williams, Kate . . . Morgan 
Wingfield, Edith . . Clarke 
Woolvin, Tillie . . . Wilcox 

Wade, Ida Crisp 

Wansley, Grady . . . "Wilkes 
White, Mattie Lou . Worth 
Whittenberg. Willouise. Clark 
Wiley, Dona .... Stephens 
Wright, Mood . . Richmond 
Willliams, Weldon. Stephens 
Williamson, Mary . Baldwin 
AVclls. Bernice . . . Franklin 



DIPLOMA B CLASS. 




A lid icws. Orien . . Oconee 


('onncr. Ruth . . 


. Walton 


Anderson. Ruby . . Oconee 


Cox, Gladys . . . 


. Jackson 


Ashe. Louise . . Richmond 


Cooley, Bessie . . 


. . White 


Baldwin, Genie M. . Morgan 


Davis. Marie . . 


. Rockdale 


Bird, Fannie .... Newton 


Downs, Katie . 


. Oconee 


Blair, Lillian . . . Douglas 


Driggers, D. P. . 


. . Bulloch 


Bonner, Matl h- Lou . Lincoln 


Daniel. Georgia . 


. Jackson 


Brantley, Inez . . . Screven 


Dickson, Jewette 


. . . Pike 



46 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 

DIPLOMA B CLASS (Continued). 

Foreman, Marion . Thomas Merritt, Lila .... Greene 

Murrell, Ermine . . Clarke 
Gilstrap, May .... Milton 

Griffin, Rebecca . . Spalding Norwood, Nora . . . Berrien 
Geer, Mary .... Greene 

Ogburn, Louise . . . Macon 
Harper, Launa . . . Oconee 

Harper, Kate .... "Wilkes Palmer, Maud . . . Jackson 
Harris, Ludie .... Pike Pettey, Blyde .... Clarke 
Hartnett, Mary . . . Pike 
Harvey, Winnie . . . Early Kiggins, Sue May . . . Pike 

Hill, Julia Harris 

Hines, Kathleen . . Harris Schley, Julia . . . Muscogee 
Hooten, Frances . . Henry Schley, Lillian . . Muscogee 
Hilsman, Pauline . . Oconee Schley, Constance. Muscogee 

Smith, Lera Walton 

Isbill, C. L. . . . Whitfield Smith, Jewell .... Butts 

Speights, Addie . . Baldwin 
Johnson, Lois . . Mitchell Stewa rt, Inez . . . Newton 

T ^ „ ._. TT Sutherland, Susie . Spalding 

Kelley, Alice .... Llenry „, . , _, ,..., 

J ' J Shirley, Etna .... Milton 

LaMotte, Loretta . Chatham 

Tyler, Mary Jasper 

McVicker, Katie Lou . Henry 

Waggoner, Zula . . Madison 

Mills, Bennie Clay Webb, Wm Clarke 

JUNIOR ELECTIVE CLASS. 

Boyd, Olive .... Spalding Dusenberry, Mrs.N. . Chatham 

Dobbs, Adalene . . . Clarke 

Callaway, Sara . . Putnam 

Clarke Clara .... Floyd Holliday, Kate . . . Clarke 

Eodgson, Ruth . . . Clarke 

Dorough, Jane . . . Fulton Hutchinson, Lucille .Morgan 



STATE) NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 
JUNIOR ELECTIVE CLASS (Continued). 



Kennedy. Lucille . . Lincoln Beid, Myrtie . . . 
Kincaid, Alice . . . Spalding Rumble, Marie . 

Reid, N. H. . . 



47 



Haralson 

Monroe 

. Carroll 



McCollum, Mvrtle . Rockdale 



Maxwell, Rachael. Richmond 



Smith, Daisy . . 
Stilhvell. Annette 



Thomason, Helena 
Odham, Araneta . . . Glynn Thomason, Bertha 

Turner, Lillie . . . 
Peacock, Dollie . . . Pulaski 
Parker, Mamie . . Rockdale Williams, Cora . 
Phillips. Mary .... Jasper Williford. Donah . 



, Chatham 
Spaulding 

. Clarke 

. . Clarke 

Gwinnett 

. Thomas 

Franklin 



DIPLOMA C CLASS. 



Amason, Sara . . . 
Allen, Bertha . . . 
Armstrong, Mary . 
Ayers, Lucy . . . 
Allen, Hettie . . . 
Aiken, C. E. . . . 
Aiken, Elizabelh . 
Arnold. Annie Sue 
Allen, Leola . . . 

Andrews. Moll . . 



. Wilkes 

. Walton 

. Harris 

Franklin 

. Jasper 

. Morgan 

, Morgan 

. Clarke 

. -Jasper 

. Coweta 



Blanchard, G. C. . Columbia 
Bower, Lyda Sue . . Newton 

Callaway, Ins . . Oglethorpe 
Callaway, Margaret .Sumter 
Callaway, Lila . . . Wilkes 
Chandler, Sara . . . Burke 
Clements, Carrie. Meriwether 
Cubbedge, Elsie . . Screven 
Carlton, Zora . . 



Broyles, Lucy .... Fulton 
Britt, Clyde .... Gwinnetl 
Branch, Sara E. . . . Greene 
Buchan, Kssa . . . Pulaski 
Buchan, Lizzie . . Pulaski 
Barkuloo, Margarel . Glynn 

Bell, Alma Grady 

Bembry, Emily . . . Pulaski 



Chapi 



nan 



Leln 



nan . 



Dunn, Bessie . 
Dorough, Louise 
Downer, Mattie 



Ford, Marjorie 
Floyd, Kale . 



Elberl 

1). Kalh 

Grady 
Fulton 
Clarke 



I Eabershara 

. . Troup 



4 8 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 



DIPLOMA C CLASS (Continued), 



Guill, Fay . 



Hancock 



Hemmingway, L. . Houston 
Hinson, Juanita . . Telfair 
Humphries, Hallie-Effingham 
Harris, Mittie .... Harris 
Holland, Mary . . . Monroe 

Jackson, Annie Lou. Jackson 



King. Maud 



Newton 



McGarity, S. S. . . Paulding 
McGarity, J. A. . . Paulding 
MeKoy, Ruth • • • Coweta 

Mathis, Mary . . . Sumter 
Moorehead, Berta . Morgan 
Mitchell, Lillian . Muscogee 



Rabun. Louette . . Chatham 
Reid, Hortense .... Pike 

Reid, Olivia Morgan 

Reynolds, Lily . . . Douglas 
Reynolds, Anna Mae. Greene 

Riley, Annie Clarke 

Rusk, Clara ..... Fulton 

Scarlett, Helen . . . Glynn 
Shannon, Leith . . Franklin 
Simpkins, Isabelle . Dougherty 
Snelling, Mollie . . . Dooly 
Swann. Bertha . . . Wilkes 
Scott, Lillian .... Colquitt 



Tarver, May . . 


. . Lincoln 


Taylor, John . . 


. . Marion 


Trimble, Eva . . 


. . DeKalb 


Vinson, C. D. . 


. . Houston 



Oliver, Eldona . 

Phillips, Nell . . 
Pittard, Sara . . 
Pollard, Emma . 
Powell, Frances . 
Prickett, Mae . 
Poland. Estelle . 



. . Oconee Walker, Ida .... Telfair 

Walton, Lena . . . Wilkes 

. Quitman Williams, Eunice . Muscogee 

. . Clarke Williamson, Cornelia. Clarke 

. Chatham Winburn, Elizabeth. Fulton 

. . Clarke Wiggins, Moselle . Muscogee 

Meriwether Wynne, Ruth .... Morgan 

. . Jones Winter, Hennie . . . Clarke 



IRREGULAR. 



Andrew, Fannie . . . Clarke Adams. Ruth Elbert 

Avers. Lettie -May . Stephens Alexander, Mamie. Franklin 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 49 

IRREGULAR (Continued). 



Addison, Ethel . . Franklin Kinnebrew. Nannie . Clarke 



Bowers, Blanch . . . Coweta 
Brown, Mrs. B. . . Hancock 
Brannen, Annie M. . Sumter 
Branson, Phil .... Clarke 
Baskin, 0. C. . . . Haralson 

Chestnut, Ruth . . . Coweta 
Crumbley, Ilva . . Quitman 
Carter, Seleta .... Cobb 
Cartee, "Willie . . . Bulloch 
Crawford, Ella . . Franklin 
Crawford, M. L. . . Stephens 

Dobson, Elizabeth. Haralson 
Edge. Mary .... Laurens 

Floyd, Hortense . . Decatur 

Foster, Lucille . . . Clarke 

Greene, Florence . . Putnam 



Haralson, Ledra . 


. Troup 


Henderson, Texas 


. . . Bibb 


Hicks, Cleophas . 


. Clayton 


Haley, Pearl . . 


. . Elbert 


Hodgson. Nell . . 


. . Clarke 


Hardy. Telah . . 


. . Jasper 


Hunt, Sara . . . 


. Hancock 


Is!, ill. Mrs. C. L. . 


Whitfield 


Knight, Ruby . . 


. . Early 


Kilgore, Mattie . 


. . Carroll 



LaMotte, Sadie 
Lester. Eunice 



Chatham 
. Bulloch 



McGaughey, Carrie . Greene 

Malone, Minnie . . . Jasper 

Martin, J. G Early 

Methvin, Louise . . . Fulton 
Michael, Helen . . . Clarke 
Moore, Lillian . . . Greene 
Martin, Lula Mae . Madison 
Montgomery, Willie. Fulton 

Peeler, Bell Clarke 

Pittman, Xorine . . . Clarke 

Pope, Effie Brooks 

Pound, Leila Clay 

Prater, Rosa .... Clarke 

Sanders, Mary . . . Floyd 

Save Nora Clarke 

Scogin. Mattie . . . Baldwin 
Sells. Mary ... Lee (Ala 
Smith. Vera .... Clarke 
Stewart, Rebecca . . Clarke 
Smith. Essie .... Baker 

Thomason, Bessie . . Clarke 
Tyler, Susie .... Jasper 

Terrell. Mildred . . Decatur 
Thomas, Annie . . . Clarke 

Wboten, Lena . . . Wilkes 
Waldrop, Lorena . . Clarke 
Whatley, Hannah. Muscogee 



5° 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 
SPECIAL STUDENTS. 



Barrow, Eleanor . . Clarke Johnson, Floyd . . . Sumter 

Barrow, Clara .... Clarke Johnson, Eliece . . . Clarke 
Burnett, Abijah. . Franklin 

Kolb, Mary . Jefferson, Ala. 

Cobb, Sara Clarke 

Campbell, Fannie . Bartow McVicker, Eula . . . Henry 

McKie, Annie Sue . Clarke 



Edwards, Elise . Meriwether Mason? Myrft 
Edwards, G. A. . Taliaferro 



Hart 



Reid, Gene Putnam 

Greene, Fannie . . . Putnam Rivers, Nolie .... Coweta 



Hull, Leila Clarke "Wood, Mrs. B. . "Washington 

Hillsman, Pattie . . Clarke Wright. Lorena . . Stephens 

Hill, Mary Clarke Whatley, Nettie . . Muscogee 

Eardy, Myra N. H. Watkins, Fannie C. Tattnall 



CORRESPONDENCE STUDENTS. 

Anderson, S. L. . . . Wayne Geeslin, Beula . . Randolph 
Austin, Annie . . . DeKalb Gnaun, A. O. . . Effingham 

Graham, Emily . . DeKalb 

Bass, Chas Carroll Graves, Ellie . . . Oconee 

Buff, Frances .... Pulaski Geiger, A. L. . . . Walton 
Blackwell, J. D. . . . Bartow Gower, Pearl .... Walton 

Coram, Beatrice . . Calhoun Ilogan, Rosannah . Gordon 
Combess, Loll is . . . Jones Hughes, Edith . Montgomery 

Chestnut, Ruth . . . Oconee Howe, Ruth Bibb 

Camp, Willie .... Walton Hamm, Gladys . . . Elbert 

Harper, J. F Elbert 

Deason, Barriet. . . Stewart 

Jones, Olive . . Effingham 

Faust, Mrs. S. C. Oglethorpe Jenkins, Berry . . . Screven 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 5 1 

CORRESPONDENCE STUDENTS (Continued). 

Long, Kate .... Randolph Sweat. Annie .... Wayne 

Sutton. Emily . . . . Bartow 

Moore, D. D Toombs Summerour, Ethel . Walton 

Moye, Elvie Harris 

Miller, R. L Oconee Turner. Ruth . . Oglethorpe 

Mobley, Edna .... "Walton Tuttle. Ivey .... Screven 

Pound, Leila Clay Underwood. Dovie . . Elbert 

Poindexter, Jennie . Randolph 

Patterson, E Emanuel Wood. Elma .... Stewart 

Peek, Mary . Chattahoochee Whelchel. Ruth .... Hall 

Williams, J. W. . . Oconee 
Quattlebaum, Maggie . Clay Whelchel, L. P. . . Jackson 

Whitehead. Clara. Gwinnett 
Read. Mrs. Maggie . Floyd 
Rowe, W. O Carroll Yates. J. II. . . Jennings. La. 

PIANO STUDENTS. 



Armstrong. Ruby (Mower. Rosa Lee 

Cubbedge, Lucile 

Barefield, Loraine Culpepper, Rachael 

Blanchard, Gertrude 

Bethea, Maggie Dickson. Ora 

Bowers, Blanche Dobbs, Adalene 

Branson, Edith. Dunn. Waudie 

Branson, Elizabeth 

Brantley, Buena Fulwood, Helen 

Brown, Emily 

Gilstrap, Ruth 

Carter, Selecta Gresham, Nannie 

( Shandler, Olivia Guill, Fay 

Chestnut, liuHi 

Clark, Annie .Maud Haley, Pearl 

Clark. May Etta Haralson. Ledra 



52 



STATE) NORMAL, SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 
PIANO STUDENTS (Continued). 



Hardy, Tilah 

Harris, Jimmie 
Haynes, India 
Hubbard, Cora 
Hunt, Sarah 
Hutcheson, Lucile 

Ivey, Mamie 

Jones, Callie 

Kennedy, Lucile 

McGaughey, Carrie 
McVicker, Eula 

Mansfield, Allie May 
Malone, Minnie 
Maxwell, Rachael 
Meadow, Euth 
Means, Lucy 



Mills, Bennie 
Morris, Sarah 

Newton, Hattie 
Norris, Lee 

Odham, Araneta 
Oliver, Eldona 

Sanders, Mary 
Scott, Lillian 
Sells, Mary 
Steele, Etheldra 
Stewart, Inez 

Talton, Laura 
Tyler, Susie 

Watkins, Fannie Cora 
Williams, Cora 
Williams, Helen 



Allen, Chloe 



VOICE STUDENTS. 

Hines, Kathleen 



Ayers, Lettie May 

Branson, Edith 

Dobbs, Adalene 

Fulwood, Helen 

Guill, Fay 
Guill, Edith 

Hardy, Myra 
Harper, Launa 



Kent, Alice May 
Kroner, Susie 

McCollum, Myrtle 

Nicholson, Myrtie Lee 

Oliver, Eldona 

Scogin, Mattie 

Watkins, Fannie Cora 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 53 

HARMONY STUDENTS. 

Blanchard, Gertrude Dobbs, Adalene 

Branson, Phil Sells, Mary 

Brantley, Buena Watkins, Fannie Cora 

VIOLIN STUDENTS. 
Chandler, Sara Geer, Mary 

GIRLS' GLEE CLUB. 
OFFICERS. 

President Annie Lou Jackson 

Secretary Bertha Allen 

Treasurer Eldona Oliver 

Librarian Texas Henderson 

Accompanist Miss Bessie Hardy 

Music Director Miss Inez Field Damon 

Allen, Bertha Ford, Marjorie 

Aiken, Elizabeth Foreman. Marion 

Amason, Sara 

Andrews, Orien Guill, Editli 

Anderson, Ruby 

Ayers, Lettie May Hardy. Myra 

Harper, Laura 
Brantley, Buena Earris, Jim 

Brantley, Enez Henderson. Texas 

Herndon, Fannie 
Clark, Clara Mines. Kathleen 

Cooper. In;i Hughes, Kstelle 

Dobbs, Adalene Jackson, Annie Lou 

Dunn, Bessie 

Dunn, Waudie Kent, Alice 



54 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE:. 

GIRLS' GLEE CLUB (Continued). 



LaMotte, Loretta 


Plunket, Mabel 




Poland, Estelle 


Maxwell, Raehael 




Oliver, Eldona 


Riley, Annie 


Pittard, Sallie 


Simpkins, Isabelle 


BOYS' GLEE CLUB. 


OFFICERS. 




;nt 


Mr. Blanchard 


ry and Treasurer 


Mr. Taylor 


Aiken, C. E. 


MeGarity, J. A. 




McGarity, S. S. 


Blanchard, G. C. 




Branson, Phil 


Reid. Hendricks 

7 


Driggers, D. F. 


Taylor, J. L. 


Isbill, C. L. 


Vinson, C. T. 


MILDRED RUTHEREORD 


GLEE CLUB. 


Allen, Bertha 


Dixon, Jewette 


Amason, Sara 


Dillard, Virginia 


Andrews, Orien 


Dunn, Bessie 


Ayers, Lettie May 






Foreman, Marion 


Brannen, Annie May 




Brantley, Inez 


Greer. Sadie 


Brantley, Buena 


Guill, Edith 




Guill, Fay 


Carlton, Zora 




Conner, Ruth 


Hancock, Bertha 


Chapman, Lehman 


Harris. Jim 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 55 

MILDRED RUTHERFORD GLEE CLUB (Continued). 



Harris, Ludie 
Head, Mary 
Henderson, Texas 
Hooten, Frances 

Ivey, Mae 
Ivey, Mamie 

Jackson, Annie Lou 
Johnson, Lois 

King. Maud 
Kinnebrew, Nannie 
Kolb, IMary 

Maxwell, Rachael 
McCoy, Ruth 
Miers, Annie 



Xorris, Lee 

Perry, Mary 

Sells, Mary 
Shannon, Lieth 
Smith, Jewell 
Stewart, Inez 

Tarver. May 
Terrell. Mildred 
Trimble, Eva 

AYheeler. Sadie 
W inborn, Elizabeth 
AVilliams, Cornelia 
Williams. Cora 
Williford, Dona 
Woolvin, Tillie 



ALTIORIA GLEE CLUB. 



Adams, Montez 
Aiken, Elizabeth 

Balkcom, Louise 
Britt, Clyde 
Buehan, Essa 
Buchan, Lizzie 



Callaway. Iris 
Callaway, Sara 
( Hark, ( Mara 
Cooley, Bessie 
Cubbedge, Elsie 



Cubbedge, Lucile 

Dorough, Jane 
Dun i). Waudie 

Ford. Marjorie 

Harper-. Laura 
Hill. Julia 
Hines, Kathleen 
1 [ughes, Estelle 

Kincaid, Alice 



56 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 
ALTIORIA GLEE CLUB (Continued). 

Prickett, May 



LaMotte, Loretta 
LaMotte, Sadie 

Mathis, Mary 
Mitchell, Lillian 

Oliver, Eldona 

Poland, Estelle 



Rabun, Louette 

Schley, Julia 
Scott, Lillian 
Simpkins, Isabelle 

Thornton, Kate 



MUSCOGEE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 



FIRST GRADE. 



Bradberry, Frank 
Bradberry, Fred 
Bowden, Guy 

Cartledge, Thomas 
Callaway, Luke 
Campbell, David 

Fowler, Roy 

Green, Thomas 



Hughes, Mildred 



Johnson, Nina 
Jennings, Pattie 

Kcmn'Y, Lawrence 
McElroy, Geneva 



McGatt, Ruth 

Moss, William 
Moore, Anna 

Orr, Donald 
Orr, Fritz 

Payne, Victor 
Presnell, Clara 
Pittman, Gladys 
Pierce, Zula 

Slaughter, Fain 

Talmadge, Charles 
Talmadge, Coke 
Thurman, Lucy 

Waldrop, Kathleen 
Wood, Sam 



-TATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 
MUSCOGEE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL | Continued ). 



57 



SECOND GRADE. 



Andrew. Mabel 

Bradberry, Albert 
Bussey, HoAvard 
Brown. Raiford 

Cartledge, Sam 

Drake. Daisy 

Evans, Frederick 

Gaulding, Sam 

Jackson, Nina 



THIRD GRADE. 



Bondurant, Elizabeth 
Burson, Mildred 

Conway, ( Jora 

Hughes, ( >pal 

Johnson. Charlie 

Lester, Patman 

Moore, Willie 



Lawrence. Lorna 

Harris. Elizabeth 

Moon, Ruby 
Moss. Rufus 

Thurman, Harris 

Whitehead. Annie 
Whitehead. Allen 
Whitworth, Fannie 
Webb, Clarence 
Williams, Lucile 

Young, James 

McElroy, Homer 
Malone, Elmo 

Newton, ('has. 

Prater, Susie 

Toss. .lames 

Seymour. Eunice 
Whitehead, Allen 
Young, Herberl 



M HJRTH GRADE. 
Bryan, Wm. T. Bowden, Roy 



58 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 

MUSCOGEE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (Continued). 



FOURTH GRADE. 



Branson, Elizabeth 

Cox, Charles 
Callaway, Ragan 
Church, Eldona 

Drake. Anna Bell 

Fleming, Geo. 

Jarrell, Jessie 

Kenny, Beatty 



FIFTH GRADE. 



Bur son, Frank 

Ford, Carrie 
Ford, Doyle 
Fowler, Frank 

Jennings, Gladys 
Jennings, Vera 

Kinnebrew, Wm. 



Mitchell, Cornelia 

Norton, Pauline 

Presnell, Ida 
Payne, Mozelle 
Pierce, Lovick 

Smith, Hattie 

Waldrep, Louise 
"Whitehead, Clifton 
Whittenberg, Erwin 

Kenny, Elizabeth 
Kenny, Garland 

Moore, Lurlie 
Moss, Thomas 

Newton, Charlotte 

Pierce, Esther 

Waldrep, Wm. 



SIXTH GRADE. 

Arnold, Allene Chrisler, Gladys 



Bowden, Lee 



Callaway, Edna 
( Jallaway, Bammond 



Daniel, Geo. 
Drake, Kathleen 

Fleming, Elizabeth 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 
MUSCOGEE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (Continued), 



59 



SIXTH GRADE. 



Hutchinson, Edna 
Hampton, Sybil 

Moss, Elizabeth 

Newton, Catherine 

Poss, Walter 

Rhodes, Beryl 



Rhodes, Nellie 
Ryder, Lucy 

Shackelford, Mona 

Talmadge, John 

Wier, Lythgoe 
Williamson, Ruth 



SEVENTH GRADE 



Burson, Susan 

Hart, Charlotte 

Iverson, Elberta 

Kinnebrew, Robt. 

Moore, Davis 
Moss, Judith 



Newton. Virginia 

Pierce, Lucile 
Pierce, Pauline 

West, Frances 
AVhittenberg, Joe 
Whitehead, Jessie 

Young, Louis 
Young, Annie 



EIGHTH GRADE. 



Andrew, Thad 

Brooks, Willie 

Callaway, Jennie 

( 'handler, Mai Audlie 

Downer, Eenrietta 

Edwards, Childress 



Hughes, Kitty 
Hunter, Frances 
Hutcheson, Alice 

Jarrell, Lottie 

Miller, Charlie 

Taylor, Louise 



6o state: normal school catalogue:. 



DIPLOMAS GRANTED MAY 30, 1910. 



Crawford E. Aiken, Newborn, Morgan County. English, Math- 
ematics, Geography and Nature Study, Elementary Agri- 
culture, Common-School Music, History, Expression, Litera- 
ture, Science (Physics and Chemistry), Psychology and 
Pedagogy, Bible Study, Principal West Point Public Schools. 

Mary Bradley, Savannah, Chatham County. English, Expression, 
Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, 
Physiology, Physics), Physical Culture, History, Geography, 
Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Com- 
mon-School Music, French, Manual Arts, Bible Study. 
Teaching in Savannah, Ga. 

Frances Blackwell, Shady Dale, Morgan County. English, Ex- 
pression, Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science 
(Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), History, Geography and 
Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Com- 
mon-School Music, Physical Culture, Domestic Science. 
Teaching in country school, Morgan County. 

B. T. Beasley, Blitch, Bulloch County. English, Expression, Lit- 
erature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, 
Physiology), History, Geography and Nature Study, Agricul- 
ture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School Music, 
Physical Culture, Bible Study. Student of Medicine in At- 
lanta. Will teach next year. 

Nell Carlton, Monroe, Walton County. English, Expression, 
Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, 
Physics, Physiology), History, Psychology and Pedagogy, 
Agriculture, Physical Culture, Common-School Music, Geo- 
graphy and Nature Study, Latin, Domestic Science, Manual 
Aits, Bible Study. Teaching in Perry-Rainey Institute, 
Auburn, Ga. 

Pearl Covington, Cartersville, Bartow County. English, Expres- 
sion, Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chem- 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 6l 

istry, Physiology, Physics), Psychology and Pedagogy, 
Agriculture, Geography and Nature Study, Physical Culture, 
Common-School Music, Manual Arts, Domestic Science, Bible 
Study. Teaching in Bartow County, county school. 

Pattie Elder, Farmington, Oconee County. English, Expression, 
Literature, History, Mathematics, Psychology and Pedagogy, 
Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), Agri- 
culture, Common-School Music, Physical Culture, Geography 
and Nature Study, Latin, Bible Study. Teaching in Winder, 
Ga. 

Edgar A. Evans, Jakin, Early County. English, Expression, Liter- 
ature, Mathematics, History, Agriculture, Psychology and 
Pedagogy, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, Physi- 
ology), Geography and Nature Study, Common-School Music, 
Physical Culture, Manual Arts, Latin. Principal of school, 
Chipley, Ga. 

Mattilu Fincher, Culloden, Monroe County. English, Expression, 
Literature, History, Mathematics, Psychology and Pedagogy, 
Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physiology, Physics), Geo- 
graphy and Nature Study, Common-School Music, Agricul- 
ture, Physical Culture, Bible Study, Manual Arts. Teaching 
in Atlanta schools. 

Robert Franklin Freeman, Preston, Webster County. English, 
Expression, Literature, History, Psychology and Pedagogy, 
Agriculture, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, 
Physics, Physiology), Common-School Music, Physical Cul- 
ture, Geography and Nature Study. Student University of 
Georgia. 

Bertha Garland, Toccoa, Stephens County. English, Expression, 
Literature, History, Mathematics, Agriculture, Psychology 
and Pedagogy, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, 
Physiology), Common-School Music, Geography and Nature 
Study, Physical Culture, Manual Arts, Domestic Science, 
Bible Study, Latin. Teaching in Toccoa, Ga. 

Fannie Lou Garrard, Washington, Wilkes County. English, Ex- 
pression, Literature. Mathematics, History. Agriculture, 
Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), 
Psychology and Pedagogy. Geography and Nature Study, 
Common-School Music Manual Arts. Physical Culture. 
Teacher in Athens Schools. 



62 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 

Margaret Clyde Hogg, LaGrange, Troup County. English, Ex- 
pression, Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science 
(Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), History, Geography and 
Nature Study, Psychology and Pedagogy, Agriculture, Com- 
mon-School Music, Physical Culture, Latin, Manual Arts, 
Domestic Science, Bible Study. Teaching in country schools, 
Stephens County. 

Annie Houze, Roswell, Milton County. English, Expression, 
Literature, History, Mathematics, Agriculture, Elementary 
Science (Chemistry, Physiology, Physics), Psychology and 
Pedagogy, Geography and Nature Study, Common-School 
Music, Physical Culture, Manual Arts, Domestic Science, 
Bible Study. Teaching in Fulton County, country schools. 

Margaret Hogan, Atlanta, Fulton County, English, Expression, 
Literature, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, Phy- 
siology), Mathematics, History, Geography and Nature 
Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common- 
School Music, Physical Culture, Latin, Domestic Science. 
Teaching in Fulton County, country schools. 

John Quitman Harvey, Jakin, Early County. English, Expres- 
sion, Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chem- 
istry, Physics, Physiology), History, Geography and Nature 
Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common- 
School Music, Physical Culture, Latin, Bible Study. Teach- 
ing in Talbot County, country schools. 

Annie Kate Johnson, Box Springs, Chattahoochee County. Eng- 
lish, Expression, Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science 
(Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), History, Geography and 
Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Com- 
mon-School Music, Physical Culture, Domestic Science. 
Teaching at Farasville, Ga., a country school. 

W. H. Key, Monticello, Jasper County. English, Expression, Lit- 
erature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Phys- 
ics, Physiology), History, Geography and Nature Study, 
Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School 
Music, Latin, Manual Arts, Bible Study. Student in the Uni- 
versity of Georgia. 

Llnie Elizabeth Killebrew, Tartsfleld, Colquitt County. English, 
Expression, Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science 
(Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), History, Geography and 
Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Com- 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. f>3 

mon-School Music, Physical Culture, Latin, Domestic Science, 
Manual Arts, Bible Study. Teaching in the Sparta Schools. 

Minnie Louise Maughon, Monroe, Walton County. English, Ex- 
pression, Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science 
(Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), History, Geography and 
Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Com- 
mon-School Music, Physical Culture, Latin, Domestic Science. 
Teaching in Forsyth country schools. 

Etta May Matthews, Carlton, Madison County. English, Expres- 
sion, Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chem- 
istry, Physics, Physiology), History, Geography and Nature 
Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common- 
School Music, Physical Culture, Latin, Manual Arts. Teach- 
ing at Temple, Ga., country school. 

Frances Edith Newsome, Union Point, Greene County. English, 
Expression, Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science 
(Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), History, Geography and 
Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Com- 
mon-School Music, Physical Culture, Domestic Science, Bible 
Study. Teaching at Siloam, Ga. 

Daisy Neel, Boston, Thomas County. English, Expression, Litera- 
ture, Mathematics, Elementary Science ( Chemistry, Physics, 
Physiology), History, Geography and Nature Study, Agri- 
culture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School Music, 
Physical Culture, French, Manual Arts, Bible Study. 

Grace Louvenia Pittman, Athens, Clarke County. English, Ex- 
pression, Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science 
(Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), History, Geography and 
Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Com- 
mon-School Music, Physical Culture, Domestic Science, Man- 
ual Arts. Teaching in Clarke county schools. 

Lucile Pope, Columbus, Muscogee County. English, Expression, 
Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, 
Physics, Physiology), History, Geography and Nature Study, 
Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Physical Culture, 
Common-School Music, Latin, Domestic Science, Manual Arts, 
Bible Study. Teaching at Barwick, Ga., country school. 

Walton Parker, Savannah, Chatham County. English, Expres- 
sion, Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chem- 
istry, Physics, Physiology), History, Agriculture, Geography 



64 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 

and Nature Study, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School 
Music, Physical Culture, Latin, Greek, Domestic Science, 
Bible Study. Teaching at Montieth, Ga., a country school. 

Miss Lily Reynolds, Lithia Springs, Douglas County. Psychology 
and Pedagogy, English, Literature, Expression, History, 
Geography and Nature Study, Elementary Science (Physi- 
ology, Chemistry, Physics), Botany, Entomology and Ele- 
mentary Agriculture, Mathematics, Common-School Music, 
Bible Study, Manual Arts, Domestic Science, Physical Cul- 
ture. State Normal School Faculty, Extension Worker in 
Douglas county. 

Ludie Simpson, Norcross, Gwinnett County. English, Expression, 
Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, 
Physiology, Physics), History, Geography and Nature Study, 
Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School 
Music, Physical Culture, Latin, Greek, Domestic Science, 
Bible Study. Teaching at Logansville, Ga. 

Hattie Ruth Sanders, Gordon, Twiggs County. English, Expres- 
sion, Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chem- 
istry, Physics, Physiology), History, Geography and Nature 
Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common- 
School Music, Physical Culture, Domestic Science, Manual 
Arts, Bible Study. Teaching in Warrenton schools. 

Annie Sale, Tignall, Wilkes County. English, Expression, Litera- 
ture, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, 
Physiology), History, Geography and Nature Study, Agri- 
culture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School Music, 
Physical Culture, Domestic Science, Manual Arts, Bible 
Study. Teaching at Goshen, Ga., country school. 

L. V. Tyler, Ocilla, Irwin County. English, Expression, Literature, 
Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, 
Physiology), History, Geography and Nature Study, Agricul- 
ture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School Music, Latin, 
Manual Arts, Bible Study. Principal Sparta schools. 

Martha Marie Wynn, Brown's Crossing, Baldwin County. English, 
Expression, Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science 
(Chemistry, Physiology, Physics), History, Geography and 
Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Com- 
mon-School .Music, Physical Culture, Bible Study, Domestic 
Science. Teaching at Scottsboro, Ga., county school. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 65 

Henry Gibbs Wiley, Eastanollee, Stephens County. English, Ex- 
pression, Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science 
(Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), History, Geography and 
Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Com- 
mon-School Music, Physical Culture, Bible Study. Teaching 
at Arnoldsville, Ga. 

Emma Watkins, Talbotton, Talbot County. English, Expression, 
Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, 
Physics, Physiology), History, Geography and Nature Study, 
Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School 
Music, Physical Culture, Bible Study. Teaching at Barwick, 
Ga., country school. 

Gladys White, Grantville, Coweta County. English, Expression, 
Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, 
Physics, Physiology), History, Geography and Nature Study, 
Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School 
Music, Bible Study. Teaching at Tallulah Falls. 

Sara Webb, Athens, Clarke County. English, Expression, Litera- 
ture, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, 
Physiology), History, Geography and Nature Study, Agri- 
culture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School Music, 
Latin. Teacher at Winterville, Ga. 



ELECTIVE DIPLOMAS. 



Emma Binns, College Park, Fulton County. Elementary Science 
Physics, Chemistry, Physiology), Nature Study, Agriculture, 
Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School Music, Physical 
Culture, French, Manual Arts, . Bible Study. Mathematics. 
Teaching in Watkinsville, Ga. 

Sadie Friedlander Berg, Cordele, Crisp County. English, Expres- 
sion, Literature, Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology and 
Pedagogy, Common-School Music, Physical Culture, French, 
German. Teaching in Columbus, Ga. 

Corinne Gerdine, Athens, Clarke County. Elementary Science 
(Chemistry. Physics, Physiology), Nature Study, Agriculture, 

Psychology and Pedagogy, French. Domestic Science, Manual 
Arts. Teaching in Marietta, Ga., schools. 



66 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 

Mary Buchanan Harper, Elberton, Elbert County. Expression, 
Literature, Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Peda- 
gogy, Physical Culture, Domestic Science, Manual Arts. 
Teaching in Muscogee Elementary School, State Normal 
School. 

Evelyn John Lane, Monticello, Jasper County. English, Expres- 
sion, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), 
Nature Study, Manual Arts, Agriculture, Psychology and 
Pedagogy, Common-School Music, Physical Culture, Domestic 
Science, Bible Study. Teaching in the Monticello Schools. 

Leda Estelle Slaton, Hamilton, Harris County. English, Expres- 
sion, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), 
Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Com- 
mon-School Music, Physical Culture, Domestic Science, Man- 
ual Arts, Bible Study. Teaching at Mountville, Ga., country 
school. 

Elma Tribble, Forsyth, Monroe County. Brief-Course Professional 
Diploma. English, Expression, Mathematics, Elementary 
Science (Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), Agriculture, Geo- 
graphy and Nature Study, Common-School Music, Physical 
Culture, Latin, French, Domestic Science, Bible Study. 
Teaching at Soperton, Ga., country school. 



CERTIFICATES GRANTED MAY 30, 1910. 



Pauline Bailey, Cedartown, Polk County. Domestic Science. 

Edna Hush, Athens, Clarke County. History, Domestic Science, 
Elementary Science. 

Rosa Lee Cliatt, Washington, Wilkes County. Expression, Nature 
Study, Psychology and Pedagogy, Physical Culture, Bible 
Study. Teaching in Watkinsville, Ga. 

Parna Hill, Athens, Clarke County. Manual Arts, Domestic 
Science. Assistant Domestic Science Department State Nor- 

in. il School. 

Sophie Harris, Augusta. Richmond County. English, Expression, 
Literature. Elementary Science, History, Geography, Nature 
Study. Agriculture; Psychology and Pedagogy, Common- 
School Music. Physical Culture, Domestic Science, Manual 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL CATALOGUE. 67 

Arts, Bible Study. Teaching at Sunshine, Ga., a country 
school. 

Anna Sue McKie, Athens, Clarke County. Domestic Science. 

Josie Prince, Eatonton, Putnam County. Nature Study, Agricul- 
ture, Physical Culture, Latin, Bible Study. Teaching at Clop- 
ton, Ga., country school. 

Mrs. de Alva Rountree, Swainsboro, Emanuel County. Domestic 
Science. 

Anna Reaves, Athens, Clarke County. Manual Arts. 

Annie Terrell, College Park, Clayton County. English, Expression, 
Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, Phys- 
iology), History, Geography, Nature Study, Agriculture, 
Common-School Music, Physical Culture, Domestic Science, 
Manual Arts, Bible Study. Teaching in Fulton county schools. 

Ann Walker, Cochran, Pulaski County Manual Arts, Domestic 
Science. 

Annie Latimer Watson, Columbus, Muscogee County. Mathe- 
matics. Teaching in Colubus Public Schools. 

Mrs. Ida Thomason, Athens, Clarke County. Domestic Science. 
Common-School extension worker in Putnam countv. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

Applicant i Read carefully and return promptly to E. C. 
Branson, President, Athens, Ga. 

PLEASE NOTE: 

1. You ought to be fully acquainted with the entrance re- 
quirements. If not, write for catalogue at once. 

2. You cannot be admitted into the School unless you bring 
a letter from your physician saying that you have not been ex- 
posed to contagious diseases in your home or neighborhood within 
the last 30 days. See Blank on next page. 

3. You must be successfully vaccinated. This can be done 
upon arrival at the School. 

4. On arrival here call for Mr. C. M. Bell, our representative, 
who will take charge of your baggage and instruct you about 
reaching the School, which can be reached by street car for 5 
cents. Do not reach the C ity on a night train. 

1. On what day will you reach Athens? 

2. Over what railroad ? 

3. Do you expert to stiy the full year? 

If not, how long'? 

4. What class do you wish to enter? 

5. Have you a license to teach? 

What grade? 

6. Have you a diploma from some high school or college? 

7. Name of school? 

8. It we have no room left in our-JDormitories, do you wish us 
to arrange board for you in a neighboring home (at from %\ 

to *l'o.oi> a month ) ? 

Signed, Name 

P. o 

County 

Dated 1 !> 1 . . . . 



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CALENDAR 1912-13. 



Aug. 


30, 


Aug. 


31, 


Sept. 


2, 


Sept. 


3, 


Dec. 


16-20 


Dec. 


20, 



1912. 

Friday — School Dormitories open. 

Saturday — Review Class Entrance Examinations, 

9 o'clock, a. m. 
Monday — Freshman Class Entrance Examinations, 

9 o'clock, a. m. 
Tuesday — Fall term begins at 9 a. m. Conditioned 

students Examinations at 3 p. m. 
Common School Review Examinations. 
Friday — Christmas Holidays begin. 

1913. 

Jan. 2, Thursday — Re-opening of School Session. 

Jan. 2 0-2 5, Mid-session Examinations. 

Apr. 17, Friday — Founder's Day. 

May 23, Friday — Annual Meeting of Board of Trustees at 

3:30 p. m. 

Annual Concert at 8:30 p. m. 
May 2 4, Saturday — Alumni-ae Day, Reunion at 12 noon. 

Annual Alumni-ae Banquet at 6 p. m. 
May 25, Sunday — Commencement Sermon at 5:00 p. m. 
May 2 6, Monday — Graduating Exercises and Commencement 

Address at 11:00 a. m. 



New students may enter at any time during the year, but it is 
best for them to enter August 30, or January 2. 

Prospective students will need to apply well in advance of their 
coming in order to be sure of places in the dormitories. The 
School can accommodate only 400 boarding students at present. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



T. J. SHACKELFORD, Athens, Ga President. 

S. B. BROWN, Albany, Ga Vice-President. 

G. A. MELL, Athens, Ga Secretary and Treasurer. 

Members ex-officio. 

Governor Jos. M. Brown, Atlanta, Ga. 

State Superintendent of Schools, M. L. Brittain, Atlanta, Ga. 

Chancellor, University of Georgia, David C. Barrow,. .Athens, Ga. 

Members-at-large. 

Col. W. J. Morton, Athens, Ga. 

J. R. Hogan, Agnes, Ga. 

Members City of Athens. 

T. J. Shackelford Athens, Ga. 

E. J. Bondurant, Athens, Ga. 

Members Representing Trustees of University of Georgia. 

Augustus O. Bacon, Macon, Ga. 

Hamilton McWhorter Athens, Ga. 

Byron B. Bower, Jr., Bainbridge, Ga. 

Members Representing Congressional Districts. 

First District, Joseph W. Smith, Manassas, Ga. 

Second District, S. B. Brown, Albany, Ga. 

Third District, J. M. Collum, Americus, Ga. 

Fourth District, A. A. Carson, Columbus, Ga. 

Fifth District, J. R. Smith, Atlanta, Ga. 

Sixth District, Dr. J. C. Beauchamp, Williamson, Ga. 

Seventh District, E. S. Griffeth, Buchanan, Ga. 

Eighth District, E. A. Copelan, Greensboro, Ga. 

Ninth District, L. M. Brand, Lawrenceville, Ga. 

Tenth District, Lawton B. Evans, Augusta, Ga. 

Eleventh District, Charles Lane, Helena, Ga. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 
Prudential — Brittain, Morton, Barrow, McWhorter, Bondurant. 
Salaries — Carson, Beauchamp, Brand, Hogan, Evans, Brown. 
Teachers and Course of Study — Collum, Barrow, Lane, Brittain, 

Hacon, Evans. 
Finance — Brand, Brown, Carson, Copelan, Bower, J. R. Smith. 
Grounds and Buildings — Bondurant, Barrow, Morton, J. W. Smith, 
Griffeth. 
The President of the Board of Trustees is a member of all 
Standing Committees, and the President of the School is a con- 
sulting member of the same. 



ANNOUNCEMENT. 



Since printing the Catalogue the following resignation has 
been received: 

"I wish to retire from the presidency of the State Normal 
School. I lay down executive responsibility in order to devote 
the remainder of my life to Economics and Sociology as a student 
and teacher; in particular to try out to a -conclusion the plans 
and purposes that have been developing in the work of the Geor- 
gia Club during the last two years. 

"In resigning executive responsibility in the school that I have 
served for fifteen years, I am moved by a love for it that remains 
deep and abiding. And my gratitude for the confidence and sup- 
port of the Board is keen and lasting. 

"Faithfully yours, 

"E. C. BRANSON." 

Upon receipt of this resignation the following resolution was 
adopted: 

"The Prudential Committee of the State Normal School having 
heard through Hon. T. J. Shackleford, chairman of the Board of 
Trustees, of the resignation of President Branson, desires to ex- 
press its appreciation of the services of President Branson, under 
whose administration the institution has grown so remarkably. 
The committee recognizes the value of the work in Rural Eco- 
nomics which President Branson has developed and to which he 
has devoted so much of energy and thought and believes he can 
render valuable service in his new field." 

Accepting Mr. Branson's resignation, the Board of Trustees 
elected Mr. Jere M. Pound president of the State Normal School, 
and he will assume the duties of the office on July 1st, next. 

Mr. Eugene C. Branson was elected as head of the newly cre- 
ated department of Rural Economics -and Sociology. 



FACULTY AND OFFICERS. 



DAVID CRENSHAW BARROW, LL.D Chancellor ex-officio. 

Chancellor of the University of Georgia. 

EUGENE C. BRANSON, A.M President. 

ALEXANDER RHODES, Dean. 

MISS PANSY B. NEWTON, Registrar. 

MISS SARA STOKES, Stenographer. 



MRS. GERTRUDE A. ALEXANDER, A.M., Professor of Expression. 
A.M. University of Nashville; student in Yanderbilt Univer- 
sity and University of Chicago; teacher at Peabody Normal, 
Cox College, Brenau College; editor of Educational Journal; 
teacher in State institutes and University Summer School. 

MISS CHLOE E. ALLEN, Assistant in department of Elementary 
Science. 

Summer student at University of Chicago and Columbia Uni- 
versity; teacher in Hancock county schools. 

MRS. EMILY WAFF BAILEY, Assistant in department of Music. 
Graduate Woman's College, Richmond, Va.; student of 
Jacob Rheindeardt; student of pupil of Barilli. 

EUGENE C. BRANSON, A.M., President. 

A.M. Trinity College, North Carolina; A.M. Peabody College. 

MISS ILA W. BROADUS, R.N., Trained Nurse. 

Graduate Louisville City Hospital Training School for Nurses; 
superintendent of nurses, Tabernacle Infirmary, Atlanta, Ga.; 
private nurse. 

PETER F. BROWN, A.M., Professor of English and Literature. 
A.M. Emory College; A.M. University of Chicago; principal 
in high schools of State; principal in Savannah Grammar 
schools; teacher in State institutes and University Summer 
School. 

C. H. BRUCE, A.B., Professor of Psychology and Pedagogy. 

A.B. Emory College; summer student at Columbia Univer- 
sity; superintendent of Eatonton schools; principal in Augus- 
ta schools. 

MRS. BRUCE CARRIER, Assistant in department of Music. 

Pupil in Belmont College; student in American Conservatory, 
Chicago; pupil of Victor Garwood; student at Wesleyan 
College. 



MRS. NELLIE DUSEXBERRY, Student-assistant in department 
of Domestic Arts and Science. 

DAVID L. EARNEST, A.M.,. . . .Professor of Elementary Science. 
A.M. Peabody College; teacher in schools of Tenn., Ala., and 
Miss.; teacher in Normal School, Jacksonville, Ala.; assistant 
school superintendent city school of Athens, Ga. ; teacher of 
science Normal and Industrial school, Milledgeville, Ga.; 
teacher in state institutes in Tenn., Ala., Miss., and Ga. 

MISS WILLIE FAGAN, Y. W. C. A. Secretary. 

MISS MARGARET M. GIBBS, Assistant in Library. 

Student in Cox College; graduate of Carnegie Library Train- 
ing School, Atlanta, Ga. 

MISS AGNES GOSS, Librarian. 

First honor graduate, Lucy Cobb Institute; graduate of 
Carnegie Library Training School, Atlanta, Ga. 

MISS BESSIE M. HARDY, Assistant in department of Music. 

Student in Leland and Gray Seminary; pupil of Alvah Glover 
Salmon, New York and John Orth, Boston; taught in private 
classes and in Leland and Gray Seminary. 

MISS KATHRYN G. HERRON, Assistant in department of Music. 
Student in Ward Conservatory; graduate pupil of Emil Wink- 
ler, D. F. Conrad and Fritz Schmitz; director of music, 
Southern Female College, Miss.; teacher of piano, Ward 
Conservatory, Nashville, Tenn. 

MISS PARNA B. HILL, Assistant in department of Domestic Arts 
and Science. 

Student in Wesleyan College and Lucy Cobb Institute; grad- 
uate in department of Domestic Arts and Science and Manual 
Arts, State Normal School. 

MISS KATE HODGSON, Assistant in department of Music. 

Student with Nell and Theodora Morgan; student in the Ber- 
lin Conservatory of Music with Joachim and Moser; voice 
pupil under Arlberg . 

MISS ROBERTA HODGSON, A.M Professor of History. 

B.S. Teachers College, New York; A.M. University of Wiscon- 
sin; diploma from Alliance Francaise, Paris, France; pro- 
fessor of Modern Languages, Wesleyan College; professor of 
English, Normal and Industrial School, Milledgeville, Ga. 



8 



T. E. HOLLINGSWORTH, A.B., Professor of Mathematics. 

A.B. Emory College; student University of Chicago; superin- 
tendent of schools at Carrollton and Washington. 

MISS AXXE P. KOLB, Physical Director. 

Graduate of Teachers College, New York; supervisor of play, 
New York city; physical director, University of Georgia Sum- 
mer School; director of play, University of Tenn. Summer 
School. 

MISS AXXIE LIXTOX, Professor of Manual Arts. 

Graduate of Teachers College, New York; student at Chicago 
University; teacher in city school of Athens and in Practice 
School of the State Normal School. 

MISS CHLOE LOYD, Assistant in department of English and 
Literature. 

Graduate of State Normal School, Athens, Ga. 

JOSEPH LUSTRAT, Bach, es Lett., Professor of French and 
Spanish. 

Bach, es Lett, University of France; professor of Romance 
Languages, University of Georgia. 

MISS ANNIE MATHEWS, Assistant in department of Mathematics. 
Graduate of State Normal School, Athens, Ga.; teacher in 
country and high schools of State: principal in high school 
of Carlton, Ga. 

FREDERICK A. MERRILL, B.Sc, Professor of Geography and 
Nature Study. 

B.S. Mass. College of Agriculture; B.Sc. Boston University; 
student at Amherst College; teacher in common schools of 
Ga.; professor of science Union Baptist Institute; teacher in 
institutes of State; professor of geography, University of 
Georgia Summer School. 

MISS ESTELLE POLAND, Student-assistant to Physical Director. 
Graduate of State Normal School, Athens, Ga. 

MISS EM. MA Y. POLLARD Student-assistant in Library. 

Graduate of State Normal School, Athens, Ga. 

MISS EDNA M. RANDALL. Professor of Domestic Arts and 
Science. 

Stout Institute, Menominie, Wis.; teacher in public schools 
of Niles, Mich, and .Milwaukee, Wis. 



9 



MISS JESSIE L. REDD, Assistant in department of History. 

Graduate of State Normal School, Athens, Ga. 

ALEXANDER RHODES, Dean. 

Graduate Miller Manual Training School, Virginia; teacher 
North Carolina Experiment Station; teacher in A. and M. 
College, Raleigh, N. C. 

E. SCOTT SELL, B.S.A., Professor of Agriculture. 

B.S.A. University of Georgia; principal of Blythe School, 
Richmond county, Ga. 

MISS HELEN L. SPROUT, Professor of German and Greek. 

Graduate of Adelphi, Brooklyn; student at Cornell University. 

MISS MAUD C. TOWNSEND, A.B., Assistant in department of 
Manual Arts. 

A.B. Marion Female Seminary, Ala.; student in Students' 
Art League, New York; summer student Arts and Crafts, 
Chautauqua, N. Y.; teacher in Va. and Ga. schools. 

MISS SARA M. WEBB, Assistant in department of Psychology 
and Pedagogy. 

Student at the Industrial Institute and College, Columbus, 
Miss.; graduate of State Normal School, Athens, Ga.; teacher 
in Winterville school. 

MISS GERTRUDE E. WOOD, Professor of Music. 

Student at Albion College Conservatory of Music; graduate 
of American Conservatory, Chicago; pupil of Robert Boice 
Carson; teacher in Ewing College, 111. and at Larimore, 
North Dak. 

MISS IDA A. YOUNG, L.I., Professor of Latin. 

Graduate of Peabody College; summer student at Harvard 
University; teacher in schools of State; principal of Wash- 
ington Female Seminary, Washington, Ga.; teacher in Uni- 
versity Summer School. 



DORMITORY MANAGEMENT. 

ALEXANDER RHODES Dormitory Manager. 

MISS EMMIE JONES, Bookkeeper. 

MISS XFLLIE COLBERT, Matron Winnie Davis Hall. 

M ISS KATE HICKS Matron Senior Hall. 

MISS CHLOE ALLEN Matron Bradwell Hall. 

MISS I5KSS1L M. HARDY, Matron Gilmer Hall. 



10 



MUSCOGEE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 



C. H. BRUCE, A.B., Director. 

KATE E. HICKS, Principal. 

Teacher in common schools of Ga.; graduate of State Nor- 
mal School; assistant in department of Psychology and Peda- 
gogy, State Normal School, Athens, Ga. 

MISS MARJORIE FORD, Teacher of Seventh and Eighth Grades. 
Student in Piedmont College; graduate of State Normal 
School. 

MISS IRIS CALLAWAY, Teacher of Fifth and Sixth Grades. 

Student in Brunswick schools; graduate of State Normal 
School. 

MISS ELIZABETH YOUNG, Teacher of Third and Fourth Grades. 
Graduate of State Normal School ; teacher in Watkinsville 
school; teacher in Summer School. University of So. Ca. 

MISS MARY WOODS, Teacher of Second Grade. 

Student at Union College, Ala., Packer Collegiate Institute, 
N. Y., Chautauqua Lake Summer School, and Harvard Uni- 
versity Summer School; teacher in city schools of Ga. 

MISS LOUISE HEMINGWAY, Teacher of First Grade. 

Student in Perry School; graduate of State Normal School; 
teacher in Griffin city schools. 

MISS REBECCA STEWART, Student-assistant, Teacher of Domes- 
tic Science. 

MISS ESSIE MITCHELL, Teacher of Rural School. 

Graduate of State Normal .School; teacher in schools of Ga. 



11 



FACULTY COMMITTEES, 1911-12. 



Library: Alexander, Hicks, Hodgson, Sprout, Goss, Brown. 

Calendar and Entertainments: Linton, Wood, Alexander. 

Schedule: Alexander, Loyd, Branson. 

Faculty Meetings: Earnest, Hollingsworth, Merrill. 

Promotion and Publicity: Merrill, Alexander, Sell, Rhodes. 

Curriculum: Brown, Bruce, Hollingsworth, Young, Alexander. 

Publication: Merrill, Brown, Earnest. 

University Representative: Alexander, Brown, Loyd, Bruce, 
Earnest. 

School Organizations: Bruce, Loyd, Wood, Sell, Earnest, Young. 

Classification: Hollingsworth, Brown, Merrill, Bruce. 

Alumni-ae: Loyd, Hicks, Allen, Redd, Elizabeth Young, Mathews, 
Hill, Webb, Pollard, Poland, Hemingway, Callaway, Ford, 
Dusenberry. 

Welfare: Rhodes, Broadus, Fagan, Kolb, Randall, Young, and the 
matrons. 

Grounds and Buildings: Rhodes, Sell, Linton. 



12 



DIRECTIONS FOR REACHING ATHENS. 



Have all baggage plainly marked with your name and STATE 
NORMAL SCHOOL, ATHENS, GA. 

Arrange to reach Athens in the day time. If this is impossible, 
notify the Dean of the school of the exact time you will arrive and 
of the railroad over which you will come, that some one may meet 
you at night. 

The school is on the street car line, as are also the Seaboard, 
the Gainesville Midland and the Southern stations. It is a five 
minute walk from the Central or Georgia stations to the car line. 
The conductors on the street cars will gladly tell you how to 
reach the school. 

Do not give your baggage checks to anyone at the depot but 
a representative of the school, and never give them to a negro 
drayman. A representative of the Normal will meet each train. 



L3 



GENERAL CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION 



The purpose of this school is to 'educate and train teachers 
for the common schools of Georgia." The terms of admission 
are as follows: 

First: The applicant must be sufficiently mature and sufficient- 
ly well prepared to undertake the work of the School successfully. 
All students, when admitted, are considered upon probation for 
a reasonable length of time; and, when unwilling or unable to 
do the work required, they will be privately counseled to with- 
draw. 

Second: Good Moral Character. Every student will be re- 
quired to hand to the President a letter of recommendation from 
some responsible party in the home neighborhood. 

Third; Good Health. This school is delightfully situated in 
the Piedmont hills. The conditions of health here cannot be 
surpassed. There are no neater, tidier school buildings or 
premises anywhere in the world; but the School is not a 
health resort, and the applicant who lacks the physical stamina 
necessary to pursue the course of study satisfactorily must not 
seek to enter. 

Fourth: No applicant will be admitted into the School who 
does not bring a letter from the home physician certifying that 
the applicant has not been exposed to any contagious diseases 
within the previous thirty days. See blank for this purpose, 
next to last page. This letter must be presented upon arrival. 

Fifth: Successful vaccination is also another absolutely nec- 
essary condition of entrance. All students whatsoever will have 
their arms examined upon arrival, by a physician; and, if they 
do not have a satisfactory scar, they must be vaccinated at once 
before they can be admitted into the school, (at a cost of fifty 
cents each). In all cases it is better for applicants to be vac- 
cinated before coming here, provided it can be done with fresh, 
pure, vaccine points. 

These last two conditions are so imperative, and will be 
adhered to so rigidly, that the applicant who neglects them will 
be necessarily subjected to great trouble in entering the School. 
Plainly and emphatically, these things must not be neglected by 
any applicant. 

Sixth: A written pledge that the applicant will teach in the 
common schools of Georgia as long as he or she has enjoyed 
the benefits of this School. 



14 



REGISTERING. 

Upon reaching the school, the student should go at once to the 
Registrar's office and fill out a registration blank properly. This 
blank is then taken to the Dormitory Manager's office, where a 
Dormitory Room Ticket will be obtained. All moneys and fees 
should at once be paid at this office and receipts secured for same. 

The student should write her name upon her dormitory ticket 
and repair to the Matron of the dormitory to which assignment 
has been made for selection of room, room-mate, etc. The rooms 
in the Winnie Davis Memorial Hall are filled by appointees of 
the Chapters of the U. D. C. If a student is to occupy a room in 
the Winnie Davis, a letter of appointment must be in the hands 
of the President by August 15. 

When the student is settled in her room she should consult the 
classification committee of the class which she wishes to enter, 
for her class card. These classification committees will meet 
students in various class rooms for all assignments. The direct- 
ory of where these committees may be found is posted in con- 
spicuous places in the corridors of the academic buildings. In 
order to be properly classified at once the student should bring 
letter of introduction, health certificate and all reports from 
former schools and teachers. 

When the student has received her class assignment and has 
been given a class card, any of the former students of the school 
will assist in making out the schedule of daily recitations. Books 
used as texts in the different classes may be obtained from the 
Dormitory Manager at reduced prices. Class cards must be shown 
to teachers of the various classes upon reporting to classes so that 
class rolls may be made. Report to all classes promptly. 

Students are required to register promptly with all their teach- 
ers according to their class assignments and to settle down to 
work at once. Only the Classification Committees may change 
the class cards after once issued, and students must not vary 
therefrom without the permission of this committee. 



ROAR DING DEPARTMENT. 

The school now has four dormitories: Gilmer Hall, Brad well 
Hall, Winnie Davis Memorial Hall, and Senior Hall (the upper 
floor of the Dining Room Building). There is accommodation 
for four hundred students. All dormitories are steam-heated, 
with toilet rooms and baths on every floor abundantly supplied 
with hot and cold water. They arc comfortable, pleasant and 
healthful homes for the students. Students in each dormitory 



L5 



are under the care of a resident matron who looks after their 
needs and comforts. The dining hall is one of the best in the 
state. 

Board in the dormitories includes room, table fare, heat, lights, 
and attendants for the rougher work. The students wait upon 
themselves for the most part. 

Each student will pay for and look after her own laundering 
with the assistance of the matron in charge. Laundering costs 
from 2 5 cents to 4 cents per week, according to the number of 
articles put into the wash. 

Each student must bring a pillow, pillow-cases, bed clothes 
(including at least one white spread), towels, hair brush and 
comb, and other personal toilet articles; also a bath-robe, bed- 
room slippers, overshoes, wrap and umbrella, all of which are 
necessary for personal safety and well-being. 

The male students do not room in the dormitories. Rooms 
are rented for them near the campus and paid for by the school. 
Such students pay the same rate for board as outlined in the 
catalogue, furnishing bedding, etc., just as the girls do. 



WINNIE DAVIS MEMORIAL HALL. 

Students who wish to occupy rooms in the Winnie Davis 
Memorial Hall must have letters assigning them these rooms by 
August 15th. If these assignments are not made by this date, 
the school authorities will reserve the right to fill these rooms 
with other students. These letters of appointment can only be 
secured through the U. D. C. chapters that furnished the rooms. 
They must be properly signed by the President of the chapter, 
and mailed to the President of the School by August 15. 



THE INFIRMARY. 

Miss Ila Broadus, trained nurse, in charge. 
This is a small building of four rooms. It has bathrooms, 
lavatories, toilets, electric lights, hot and cold water, and a gas- 
range. The furnishings are entirely comfortable. It is a cosy, 
quiet retreat for students who from time to time may need such 
quiet. The Infirmary is in charge of a trained nurse, most of 
whose time is spent, not in looking after students who are sick, 
but in caring for them to see that they do not get sick. With 
the matrons, she takes general oversight and care of the entire 
student body. The health of the student body has always been 
superb. 



L6 



EXPENSES. 

Terms for Board. 

(Payable in advance as indicated.) 

September 3rd, 1912 — First payment 25.00 

November 5th, 1912 — Second payment 25.00 

January 2 0th, 1913 — Third payment 2 5. CO 

March 24th, 1913 — Fourth payment 25.00 

$100.00 
Matriculation Fee (To be paid on entrance) 8.00 

Students who enter before September 3rd will be charged at 
the rate of 50 cents per day to September 3rd. 

Board for students who do not make the full quarterly pay- 
ments, as indicated above, will be at the rate of $3.00 per week, 
or 50 cents per day. 

Students who cannot enter at the regular dates will be re- 
ceived at any time during the session" just as their opportunities 
may permit. 

Money deposited on dormitory account cannot be refunded. 
Money deposited on personal account can be withdrawn at any 
time. 

There is, of course, no tuition paid by Georgia students. 
Students from outside the state arc required to pay $50.00 per 
year, in advance, for tuition. 

Students who cannot enter until after the session begins will 
pay only for the time that they are in the school and will be 
given the quarterly rate, provided they pay for nine weeks in 
advance. 



UNIFORMS. 



All students of the State Normal School, except the members 
of the Half-Year Review Class, are required to purchase and 
wear the regular uniform adopted by the school. 

This uniform consists of a coat suit that can be bought here 
for not more than $13.50, and a summer uniform consisting of a 
one-piece dress, costing not more than $4.50. Uniform hats will 
also be worn which will be extra to tho above prices. 

The winter suit is wool storm serge, satin lined. Its wearing 
qualities are guaranteed. It is fitted without extra charge. 

If the student wishes to make her own shirt waist, she can buy 
the material here at wholesale price and get the pattern free of 
charge. A descriptive order blank will be mailed from the 
President's offce upon application. 



18 



These uniforms were adopted by request of the student body in 
order to lessen the expense of dress. 



COLLEGE BOOK STORE. 

The school authorities buy, at the regular dealers' discount, 
all books, stationery, etc., needed by the students. These are 
sold to the student at less than the regular retail rates and thus 
a considerable sum of money may be saved in the purchase of 
text-books. 



NEW CARNEGIE LIBRARY. 

This beautiful $25,000 building, the generous gift of Mr. 
Andrew Carnegie, was planned by Messrs. Peabody and Ludlow, 
and built by Moise de Leon. The handsome library furniture is 
substantial as well as beautiful, and is in perfect harmony with 
the elegance of the building. 

Although occupied but two years, the library has awakened 
new interest and has shown a marvelous growth, the circulation 
this year almost doubling that of last year. The library consists 
of 7,055 volumes, 1,000 new books having been added during 
each of the past two years. 

One of the great purposes of a library connected with a school 
such as the Normal School is to encourage a desire for reading 
by the students, and that this end has been attained is attested 
by the fact that the average monthly circulation is in excess of 
1,400 books, while the largest daily circulation has been over 
90 volumes. The principal work of the library force this year 
has been the re-cataloguing of old books in accordance with the 
most approved library system. The library is in charge of a 
trained librarian and cataloguer, Miss Agnes Goss, with Misses 
Gibbs and Pollard as assistants. 



CLASS ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS. 

1. Applicants for the Freshman Class must have completed 
Arithmetic, Grammar, Geography, and United States History, and 
be able to pass a satisfactory test in these subjects or show that 
they have had sixty-three months of Grammar School work. 

2. Applicants for Sophomore and Junior Classes of the Regu- 
lar Course must be able to paSs a test on the work of the classes 
below. If an applicant fails in four or more of the subjects 
required for admission, she will be required to take these subjects 
with the class below and to fill out the required number of 
periods in that class with either the required or optional subjects 



1!) 



of the lower class, choosing these under the guidance of the 
Classification Committee. 

3. Graduates of the Three-Year University Accredited High 
Schools offering a minimum of twelve units for graduation will 
be admitted to the Junior Class of the Regular Diploma Course 
without examination, providing the units offered cover subjects 
1 . ursued in the Freshman and Sophomore Classes of this School. 

4. Graduates of the Four-Year University Accredited High 
Schools offering a minimum of fourteen units for graduation will 
be given credit for academic work done in such schools providing 
the units offered cover the subjects pursued in the lower classes 
of this school in the Regular Diploma Course, and will be allowed 
to graduate in two years in this school. Such students must 
accomplish twenty-one periods of work during the second year, 
as offered in the Two-Year Elective Course. (See Course of 
Study ) . 

5. All students coming from the University Accredited High 
Schools will be given full credit for work done there upon pres- 
entation of the proper certificate from the principals of such 
accredited schools. 

6. Graduates of the Four-Year University Accredited High 
Schools offering a minimum of fourteen units for graduation, or 
of higher institutions, who have a first grade license to teach, 
and have had at least oiip year's experience in teaching (of a 
minimum of seven months) shall receive credit for twenty-two 
of the forty-three required units of work and shall make the re- 
maining twenty-one required units by taking the One-Year Elect- 
ive Course. (See Course of Study). 



AWARDS FOR 1912-13. 

One diploma, a professional one, shall be awarded by the State 
Normal School to those students who complete successfully the 
prescribed course of study. Forty-three required units of work, 
twenty-two Junior and twenty-one Senior, must be accomplished 
during the last two years of the course. Due credit in all classes 
will be given for work done in the University Accredited High 
Schools. 

Special students will be granted a certificate by the department 
in which special courses are completed as outlined by the de- 
partment. 

A Common School Training certificate will be granted to stu- 
dents completing successfully the course as outlined by the 
curriculum committee for the One-Year Certificate Course. (See 
Course of Study. 



20 



OUTLINE OF COURSES OFFERED. 



(The figures indicate the number of lessons per week) 
REVIEW COURSE. 



Required Subjects. 



Physiology . 

Composition 

'"Spelling . . 

^Literature . 

^Expression . 



2 

2 

1 

2 

2 

General History 4 

Arithmetic 2 



Algebra 3 

Latin, 

French, I 3 

or German J 

Nature Study 2 

Penmanship 2 



2 5 



HALF-YEAR COMMON SCHOOL REVIEW COURSE. 



Required Subjects. 



Professional texts . . . 

Geography 

Grammar 

Spelling 

Expression 

Agriculture 

Common School Music . 
Blackboard Illustrations 



Arithmetic 4 

United States History .... 2 

Georgia History L 

Civics 1 

Physiology 2 

Nature Study 2 

Penmanship 1 



26 



Options: Spelling and penmanship may be passed off by exam- 
ination and two additional periods in Common School Music taken. 

ONE-YEAR CERTIFICATE COURSE. 

I irst ball-year. Second half-year. 

Psychology 4 History of Education .... 3 

Grammar :] Professional texts 

Arithmetic 4 as adopted by the 

Geography 2 • State Hoard of Education . I 

13 7 

A total of 25 periods per week shall be taken in this class. 12 
being chosen during the first ball-year and 18 during the Becond 
half-year from any of the other courses. 



21 



ONE-YEAR ELECTIVE COURSE. 



First half-year. 

Child Study 2 

Principles of Education ... 3 

Psychology 4 

Soils and School Gardening . 2 

Manual Arts or Dom. Science 4 

Practice Teaching 4 

Nature Study 1 

Domestic Science 1 

Conference (1) 
Physical Culture (1) 



Second half-year. 

Methods 2 

History of Education .... 3 
School Management and 

Supervision 3 

Practice Teaching & Method 4 

Soils and School Gardening . 2 

Literature 2 

Domestic Science 1 

Manual Arts or Dom. Science 4 
Conference (1) 
Physical Culture (1) 



21 21 

Options: Subjects may be chosen from the list of options given 
under the Senior Class. 

Total number of recitation periods per week must not exceed 2 7. 



TWO-YEAR ELECTIVE COURSE. 

First 



Year. 



First half-year. 

Nature Study . , . 2 

Psychology . . I 4 

Chemistry 4 

Manual Arts or Dom. Science 4 

Blackboard Illustration /V". 1 

Expression . . . . r 7-^". . . 2 

Art Criticism 1 

Soils and School Gardening . 2 

Options required 2 

Physical Culture (2) 



22 



Second half-year.. 

Literature for grades . . 



. . 



Methods 

History of Education 

Chemistry 

Agricultural Botany . fy 
Soils and School Gardening 
Manual Arts or Domestic 

Science 4 

Options required 2 

Physical Culture (2) 



22 



Options: Latin (2), Greek (2), French (2), German (2), 
Domestic Science (4), Manual Arts (4), Common School Music 
(2), Literature (2), Geography (2), Household Chemistry (2). 

Total number of recitations per week must not exceed 2 8. A 
total of. at least 2 2 periods per week is required in each half-year. 
Two periods of this number must be selected from the optional 
subjects. 

Second Year. 

The schedule of subjects for the second year in the Two-year 
Elective Class is the same as that for the Senior Class. 



22 



FOUR-YEAR COURSE. 



Freshman Class. 

English Composition "... 2 

American Literature .... 2 

Expression c 2 

English History 2 

Algebra 5 

Physical Geography- .... 3 

Agriculture 2 

Latin, German, French ... 3 

or Spanish (2) 
Physical Culture (2) 



21 



Options: Latin (3), Greek 
(3), French (2), German (3), 
Domestic Science (4), Manual 
Arts (4), Common School Mu- 
sic (2). 

Total number of recitations 
per week must not exceed 2 5. 

Junior Class. L » 

Geography methods and re»» 

views (1st half-year) . '. 2 

Grammar (1st half-year) . . 2 

Psychology (1st half-year) . 4 
History of Education 

(2nd half-year) 3 

Methods (2nd half-year) '*. . 2 
Blackboard Illustration 

£ftfi4 half-year) . : . . . 1 

Soils and School Gardening . 2 

Civics :-. . 2 

English Literature 

( 2nd half-year) 2 

Expression 2 

Chemistry 4 

Solid Geometry and Algebra 4 
Physical Culture (2) 

22 

Options: Latin. (2), Greek 
(2), French (2), German (2), 
Domestic Science (4), Manual 
Arts (4), Common School Music 
(2), Literature (2) Geography 
(2). 

Total number of recitations 
per week must not exceed 2 8. 



Sophomore Class. 

Rhetoric 2 

English Literature 2 

Expression 2 

Physiography (1st half-year) 3 
Agricultural Botany 

(2nd half-year) 3 

Physics 4 

Geometry 4 

History of Modern Europe . 2 
Latin, German, French 

or Spanish 2 

Physical Culture (2) 

21 
Options: Latin (3), Greek 
(3), French (2), German (2), 
Domestic Science (4), Manual 
Arts (4), Common School Mu- 
sic (2). 

Total number of recitations 
per week must not exceed 2 7. 

Senior Class. 

Domestic Science 1 

Reviews and methods in: 

Arithmetic (1st half-year) 3 

History (2nd half-year) . 3 

Physiology (2nd half-year) 2 

Child Study (1st half-year) 2 

Principles of Education 

(1st half-year) 3 

Organization and Man- 
agement (2nd half-year) 3 
Literature for grades 

(1st half-year) 3 

Expression (2nd half-year) . 3 
Field Crops (1st half-year) 2 
Nature Study (2nd half-year) 2 

Practice Teaching 4 

Conference (1) 
Physical Culture (2) 

18 
Options: Latin (2), Greek 
(2), French (2), German (2), 
Domestic Science (4), Manual 
Arts (4), Common School Music 
(2), Trigonometry (2), Litera- 
ture (2), Rural Economics (2), 
Geography (2), Poultry (2). 

Total number of recitations 
per week must not exceed 2 7. 
A total of 22 periods is requir- 
ed, 18 of these as specified 
above and 4 to be selected from 
the list of optional subjects. 



23 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY AND PEDAGOGY. 



C. H. BRUCE. 
MISS SARA WEBB. 



Junior Class. 

Psychology. A course in psychology from the standpoint of 
educational theory and practice. It includes a study of the nature 
of mental processes and the purpose they serve in life, with 
special emphasis on the laws of instinct, habit, association, dis- 
sociation, apperception, thinking, action and states of will. 

Text-book: Thorndike's Elements of Psychology. 

References: James, Arigell, Pillsbury, Titchener. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the first semester. 

History of Education. The aim of the course is to present the 
educational ideals, practices and tendencies of the past as a 
basis for the interpretation of modern educational theory and 
practice. The course embraces a study of Oriental, Classical, 
Medieval and Renaissance education; educational theories of 
Comenius, Locke, Bousseau, Pestalozzi, Froebel, Herbart and 
Spencer; present tendencies in education. 

Text-book: Monroe's Brief Course in the History of Education. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the second semester. 

The Lesson, Observation, and Teaching. Study of the nature, 
structure, function and place of the lesson; the working of the 
child's mind in the progress of the lesson; the work of the teach- 
er in stimulating and guiding the child's activities; making and 
teaching lesson wholes under sympathetic and constructive criti- 
cism; observation of teaching and reports on their observation. 
Text-book: Parrish's The Lesson. (Revised Edition). 

Two periods a week throughout 
the first semester. 

Senior Class. 

Principles of Education. The meaning of education, of the 
school, and of the curriculum; the place of instinct, interest and 
attention in the teaching process; principles of teaching based on 
the laws of association, dissociation, apperception, memory, think- 
ing, and action. 

Text-book: Thorndike's Principles of Teaching. 



24 



References: Strayer's A Brief Course in the Teaching Process, 
Dewey's My Pedagogical Creed, Bolton's Principles of Education, 
Jones' Principles of Education, Bagley's Educational Values. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the first semester. 

Child Study. The physical nature of the child; abnormalities 
and defects with methods of remedy; tests and measurements; 
the meaning of infancy; periods of childhood; the development of 
instincts; suggestion and habit; the moral development of the 
child; personality; influences affecting personality. The work is 
done by readings, discussions, observations, reports from litera- 
ture, and occasional lectures. Some practice work is done and 
reports made to parents. 

Text-book: Kirkpatrick's Child Study. 

References: Rowe's Physical Nature of the Child; Grigg's 
Moral Education; King's Psychology of Childhood; Sully's Studies 
of Childhood; Hall's Adolescence. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the first semester. 

School Supervision and Management. Course of study, daily 
program; grading and promotion of pupils; rewards and punish- 
ments; order and disorder; school buildings and equipment; the 
relation of the rural school to the general rural problem; the 
rural school as a center of community service; the consolidation 
of schools, etc. 

Text-books: Dutton's School Management; Foght's The Ameri- 
can Rural School. 

Three periods a week throughout 
second semester. 

Practice Teaching. The members of the Senior Class are re- 
quired to teach four hours a week throughout the year in the 
Muscogee Elementary School, under the supervision and guidance 
of the Head of the Department of Pedagogy, and the Principal of 
the Practice School. Before teaching, careful plans are prepared 
and submitted for criticism. 

Conference. The officers and teachers of the department, the 
officers and teachers of the Elementary School, and all members 
of the Senior Class meet once a week for conference and discus- 
sion of the work of the Elementary School. 



26 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH AND LITERATURE. 



P. F. BROWN, 

MRS. G. A. ALEXANDER, 

MISS CHLOE LOYD. 



The aim of this department is: 1. To review thoroughly the 
principles of English Grammar; 2. To train the student in the 
use of correct and forceful English, by a study of the principles of 
Composition and by continual practice in oral and written ex- 
ercises; 3. To instil a love for good literature, and appreciation of 
its beauties, and a desire to acquire a literary style. 

Review Class. 

Composition: Hitchcock's Enlarged Practice Book. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Spelling: Sand wick and Bacon's Speller. 

One period a week throughout 
the year. 

Literature: Elson Readers, Books III and IV. Book III, King 
Arthur Stories, Scott's Tales of a Grandfather, American Authors. 
Book IV, American Authors. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Half-year Common School Review Class. 

This course is planned as a preparation for the state examina- 
tion. Therefore, the adopted texts are used. The essentials of 
English Grammar and much practice in composition will be given. 
Grammar: Hyde's Second Book. 

Two periods a week throughout 
one semester. 

Composition: Stebbins' Sentence Improvement. 

One period a week throughout 
one semester. 

Spelling: Branson's Second Book. 

One period a week throughout 
one semester. 



27 



Certificate Course. 

The purpose of this course being the same as the one last out- 
lined, the text-books and periods are those mentioned above, with 
the exception of Spelling, which is not offered in this class. 

Freshman Class. 

In this class the mechanical features of composition are stress- 
ed. Punctuation, Diction, Sentence, Paragraphs, and Letter- 
writing. 

Composition: Hanson's English Composition. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Literature: Noble's Studies in American Literature, and the 
following classics: 

For careful study: Bryant's Thanatopsis, Irving's Sketch Book, 
Webster's First Bunker Hill Oration, Emerson's Essays (Selected), 
Lowell's The Vision of Sir Launfal, Whittier's Snow-Bound. 

For reading and reports: Franklin's Autobiography, Poe's 
Tales and Poems, Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans, Longfel- 
low's Hiawatha, Walt Whitman's Poems (Selected), The Southern 
Poets, Hawthorne's The House of the Seven Gables, Hale's A Man 
Without a Country, Grady's Addresses. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Sophomore Class. 

The work in Rhetoric consists in a study of the principles of 
Narration, Description, Exposition, and Argument, and the appli- 
cation of these in one written theme a week. 

Rhetoric: Webster's English for Secondary Schools. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Literature: English literature of the eighteenth and nineteenth 
centuries. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Text: Pancoast and Shelly's First Book in English Literature. 

Classics — For careful study: Carlyle's Essay on Burns, Burke's 
Speech on Conciliation with America, Coleridge's The Ancient 
Mariner. Selections from Shelley and Keats, Tennyson's Idyls of 
the King. 

28 



For reading and reports: Goldsmith's The Vicar of Wakefield, 
Gray's An Elegy in a Country Churchyard, Burns' Poems (Select- 
ed), Wordsworth's Poems (Selected), Scott's Ivanhoe and The 
Lady of the Lake, Lamb's Essays of Elia, Byron's Prisoner of 
Chillon and Mazeppa, Macaulay's Lays of Ancient Rome, Dickens' 
A Tale of Two Cities, George Eliot's Silas Marner, Stevenson's 
Treasure Island, Browning's Short Poems. 

Junior Class. 

The purpose of the review in Grammar is to familiarize the 
student with all the different opinions of grammarians on the 
disputed points of English usage. 

Text in Grammar: MacEwan's Essentials of English. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the lirst semester. 

The Literature is for the purpose of familiarizing students of 
this class with the folk-lore of all nations, and of drilling them in 
the art of telling these stories to children. The following classics 
will be used: 

Scudder's Fables and Folk-stories, Harris' Uncle Remus, De 
Foe's Robinson Crusoe, The Old Testament Stories, Longfellow's 
Hiawatha, The Arabian Nights, Hawthorne's Wonderbook and 
Tanglewood Tales, The Story of the Iliad, The Story of the Odys- 
sey, The Story of the Aeneid, Macaulay's Lays of Ancient Rome, 
Old Norse Myths, The Song of Roland, Stories of Robin Hood, 
Stories of King Arthur, Scudder's Book of Legends. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the second semester. 

Senior Class. 

The English in this class consists entirely of literature. Some 
practice in theme-writing will be afforded in the reports upon the 
pieces of literature studied. This class will complete the course 
in English Literature which was begun in the Sophomore year, 
studying the history of English Literature from its beginning 
through the seventeenth century. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the first semester. 

Text: Pancoast and Shelly's First Book in English Literature. 

Classics — For careful study: Chaucer's Prologue to the Canter- 
bury Tales, Knight's Tale, and Nun's Priest's Tale. Shakespeare's 
The Merchant of Venice, King Lear, and Henry l\\. Part I. 



29 



Milton's L'Allegro, II Penseroso, Comus, and Lycidas. Macaulay's 
Essay on Milton. 

For reading and reports: Selections from Wyatt and Surrey, 
Spenser's The Faerie Queene, Book I., Marlowe's The Jew of 
Malta, Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, Dryden's Palamon and Arcite, 
Addison and Steele's Sir Roger de Coverley Papers, DeFoe's Rob- 
inson Crusoe, Swift's Gulliver's Travels. 

Optional Courses in Literature. 

Junior Class. — The Development of the Drama. 

Two periods a week throughout 

the first semester. 

Mrs. Alexander. 

The English Essayists. 

Two periods a week throughout 

the second semester. 

Mr. Brown. 

Senior Class. — The History of the English Novel. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the first semester. 
Mr. Brown. 
Studies in Tennyson and Browning. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the second semester. 
Mrs. Alexander. 



30 



DEPARTMENT OF EXPRESSION. 



MRS. G. A. ALEXANDER. 



The object of this department is to produce effective readers 
and speakers, and competent teachers of the subject of reading; 
to substitute simple, natural methods of expression for the faulty 
delivery which commonly prevails. The aim is to supply to those 
who use the voice a course as scientific and thorough as can be 
found in any phase of education; to supply a course which is 
conducive to health; and to add a personal accomplishment. The 
scope of the work is indicated by the following outline of courses. 

One-Half Year Common School Review Class. 

The students who comprise this class are mainly teachers of 
more or less experience, who are in attendance only one semester, 
and who wish a thorough review of the subjects taught in the 
common schools of the state; the work offered is, therefore, main- 
ly a method-course, and consists of thorough work in Phonetics, in 
methods of teaching primary reading, intermediate grade reading, 
and higher grade reading. The texts are: Ward's Manual for 
Teachers; The New Education Reader, Vol. I; Perception Cards 
to accompany these texts; Readers adopted by the State for the 
Common Schools. 

One period a week throughout 
the semester. 

Review Class — Entire Year. 

Lessons in Articulation — freedom of organs of speech; place- 
ment; accurate moulding of the elements of speech; pronuncia- 
tion. 

Yocal Technique — breath control; development of resonance; 
placing of tones; purity; tone projection; flexibility; compass; 
smoothness; power, and brilliancy of tones; freedom. 

Texts used: Evolution of Expression — the sixteen progressive 
and graded steps through which the pupil may be brought to a 
realization of the criteria of the teacher. Study of selections 
from the great orators, essayists, -dramatists, and poets, illustra- 
tive of these sixteen steps; the meaning of the steps, and their 
relation and interdependence; drill work and application to the 
individual need of the pupil. The methods of instruction in this 
course are based upon the fundamental laws according to which 

31 



the mind unfolds. The work is fundamental, because it develops 
something in the pupil's mind power at every step; and practical, 
inasmuch as his practice is constantly tested by his ability to move 
his audience. Required Reading: The Merchant of Venice; Sohrab 
and Rustum; Enoch Arden; Robert of Sicily. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Freshman Class. 

Continuation of work in Articulation and Vocal Technique; 
Lessons in Vocal Expression; Tone Drills; Story Telling; drill in 
reading well chosen selections. 

Texts used: Phillips's Natural Drills in Expression; Classics 
for Vocal Expression selected from Shakespeare, Tennyson, Rus- 
kin, Victor Hugo, the Bible. 

Required Reading: Richard II, III; Henry IV, V, VIII; Julius 
Caesar; The School for Scandal. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Sophomore Class. 

Tone drills continued. Literary Analysis — fundamental prin- 
ciples of expression; intellectual conception; development of 
power to read ideas; training of the eye; cultivation of the imag- 
ination: picturing; studies of expression of simple emotions; 
series of studies for development of directness; practical exercises 
for cultivation of animation in reading and speaking, and in 
c . .uralness and simplicity; relation of reader to audience; com- 
manding attention; intensity of expression; development of mo- 
mentum; studies in light and shade; subtlety; studies in fulfill- 
ment of author's purpose; studies in atmosphere. 

Dramatic interpretation, and presentation of scenes from 
Shakespeare, Sheridan, Goldsmith, Dickens, and Kipling; and one 
a( t plays. 

Required reading: The Tempest; Romeo and Juliet; The Tam- 
ing of the Shrew; She Stoops to Conquer; The Idylls of the King. 

Two periods a week through out 
the year. 

Junior (lass. 

To some extent, time (luring this year must be given to methods, 
in order to prepare the students for teaching in the Practice 

32 



School during their senior year. This part of the work will con- 
sist in methods for Primary and Grammar grades, and will include 
lectures, discussions, and practical illustrative exercises. Some of 
the phases of reading studied are: the relation of reading to other 
studies in the curriculum; methods of getting good reading; 
enunciation and pronunciation; phonics; pitch, inflection, modu- 
lation, model work; the development lesson; conduct of the read- 
ing lesson; emphasis of the importance of good oral reading on 
the part of the teacher. 

The Junior work will also include Prose Forms, and Poetic 
Interpretation — expressive study of Description and Narrative; 
Epic, Lyric, and Dramatic poetry, with special reference to the 
needs of the interpreter. Drill on steps of advanced criteria 
of expression. The texts used will be Clark's How to Teach 
Reading in the Public Schools, and various poems, plays, and 
prose selections. 

Required Reading: As You Like It; Twelfth Night; Midsummer 
Night's Dream; The Rivals. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Senior Work. 

^Dramatic study and interpretation, plot, character study, and 
presentation of scenes from Shakespeare, and from modern 
dramatists, as Ibsen, Rostand, Hauptmann, Maeterlinck, Yeats. 
Thorough study of Browning and the Dramatic Monologue. 
Required reading: Hamlet, Othello, Lear, and Macbeth. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the second semester. 

Certificate Course in Expression. 

A certificate will be awarded in Expression to those students 
who complete the entire required work offered in the subject, 
and who also complete courses in the required work offered in 
Literature, Junior and Senior, or the optional work offered in 
Literature during these two years; Psychology; History of Educa- 
tion; Child Study; Principles of Education; Methods; Physiology; 
Rhetoric; Common School .Music: one Modern Language; Phys- 
ical Culture. 

No certificate will be awarded for less than two years' work. 



33 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS. 



T. E. HOLLINGSWORTH. 
MISS ANNIE MATHEWS. 



Review Class. 

The work of this class is planned to give (1) a review of the 
most essential parts of arithmetic, and (2) preparation for work 
in the higher classes. The work includes an introductory course 
in Algebra, graphical representation in both Arithmetic and 
Algebra, practice in the use of algebraic symbols, the algebraic 
and arithmetical equation compared in the solution of problems, 
factoring in both Arithmetic and Algebra, etc. 

The Course in Arithmetic will not be confined to the text, 
many exercises and problems, both oral and written, being made 
by students and teachers from data concerning the various in- 
dustries of Georgia. 

Texts: Harvey's Practical Arithmetic, No. 2, and Well's First 
Course in Algebra. 

Five periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Half-Year Common School Review Class. 

This course is intended especially for teachers who wish to 
review Arithmetic. The essential topics and fundamental prin- 
ciples are studied and the work is related as closely as possible 
to the needs of the students. 

A new class is formed at the beginning of each semester. 
Text: Wentworth's Practical Arithmetic, Georgia Edition. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Certificate Course. 

The work given in the Half-Year Review class will be required 
of all students taking this Certificate Course. Credit in this work 
towards a certificate will be given only for excellent work in 
recitation and examinations. 

Freshman Class. 

The aim of this course is first, to give a thorough working 
knowledge of the principal topics of Elementary Algebra, in- 
cluding graphical representation through Quadratics; and second, 
to introduce the student to the study of elementary form through 



34 



a series of carefully selected exercises in Inventional Geometry. 
The texts used will be Hawkes, Luby, Teuton's First Course in 
Algebra, and Campbell's Observational Geometry. 

Five periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Sophomore Class. 

Plane Geometry. Five Books. In this course exercises re- 
quiring the use of instruments in constructions are given from 
the first. Demonstrations are immediately followed by applica- 
tions. A foundation is laid for a thorough understanding of the 
underlying principles of all forms of mensuration in Arithmetic 
and Solid Geometry. Special emphasis is placed upon original 
demonstrations and the practical applications to the vocations 
of life. 

Texts: Wentworth-Smith's Plane Geometry, Revised, and 
Geometric Exercises for Algebraic Solution. 

Junior Class. 

The work of this class is divided between Advanced Algebra 
and Solid Geometry. 

1. Algebra. Quadratics and beyond, including a very brief 
review of the principal topics in the first course, if necessary. 

Texts; Hawkes-Luby-Touton's Second Course, and Myers's 
Geometric Exercises for Algebraic Solution. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

2. Solid Geometry. The work of this course centers about 
mensuration; special attention is given to actual measurements 
and construction in the mensuration of surfaces and solids, and 
a comparative study of arithmetical and geometric methods of 
proof of many propositions, practical measurements in Arithmetic 
being included in this course. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Senior Class. 

The work of this class includes ( 1 ) Arithmetic — required of 
all students in the class, and (2) Plane Trigonometry — optional. 

The course in Arithmetic is intended to give a thorough re- 
view of the leading topics, and includes both subject-matter and 
method— as far as the limited time given the subject will permit. 



36 



Texts: 1. Wentworth's Practical Arithmetic, supplemented with 
practical, modern problems related to agriculture and other indus- 
tries of the country. 2. Smith's The Teaching of Arithmetic. 

Three periods a week, first half-year. 

The course in Trigonometry emphasizes the practical side of 
the subject, including drawing to scale in plotting areas, calculat- 
ing heights and distances, field practice in the use of simple in- 
struments in the measurement of horizontal angles and angles 
of elevation and depression, etc. 
Text: (To be selected later.) 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 



DEPARTMENT OF ELEMENTARY SCIENCE. 



D. L. EARNEST. 
MISS CHLOE ALLEN. 



Review Class. 

1. Physiology. Aims: To know and love the subject and 
acquire a respect for the human body and human health and 
happiness; to understand, to observe, to reason, to think; to 
conserve health, promote sanitation and to induce in home and 
school the best conditions for vitality and efficiency; to teach 
care of self and of the pupil and increase the interest of the 
State in public sanitation; to hasten the coming of the newer 
and nobler civilization. 

Means employed: Manikin, Dissected specimens, Stereopticon, 
Microscopes, Slides and specimens, Experiments, Reports, Lectures. 
Text-book: Conn & Budington's Advanced Physiology and 
Hygiene. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Half- Year Common School Review Class. 

2. Physiology. See Course l. 

Two periods a week throughout 

the year. 



37 



Sophomore Class. 

3. Physics. Aims: To learn the general laws of nature by a 
study of present, daily occurrences, activities and forces, a three- 
fold aim — (1) Training in dexterity, order and efficiency, (2) 
Accuracy in observation, (3) Development of intelligence, under- 
standing, imagination, reason. 

Means: Text-book, laboratory. Method: Note and describe 
what occurred, then explain. Answer fully what. Having the 
facts, study and discuss why. 

Text-book: Gorton's High School Course in Physics. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Junior Class. 

4. Chemistry. Aims: In addition to results already discussed 
under Physics, Chemistry seeks a further acquaintance with 
structure and property and appeals more strongly to the imagina- 
tion by dealing with subtler forces, in elementary way laying 
the foundation for practical knowledge suited to the home, the 
farm and the shop. Fee, one dollar each semester. 

Text-book: First Principles of Chemistry; Brownlee, and others. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Senior Class. 

5. Physiology. Read Course 1. A slightly different purpose 
is in view; the review is for immediate use, and more extensive 
study of Method may be undertaken, and a wider range of reading 
invited; more lectures and experiments. 

Text-book; Conn and Budington's Advanced Physiology and 
Hygiene. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the second semester. 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY. 



MISS ROBERTA HODGSON. 
MISS JESSIE L. REDD. 



The Department of History aims to give such knowledge of 
the past as is essential to the understanding of life to-day, to 



38 



train students in accuracy in study, in the use of library refer- 
ences, and in the expression of trustworthy opinions on facts, to 
furnish some experience in methods of historical teaching to 
the future teachers of Georgia. 

The Review Class. 

Will lay the foundation for the proper understanding of History 
and Civics, with especial emphasis on the origins of law, govern- 
ment and culture in Ancient History. 

Text-book: Myer's General History, Revised Edition. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 



Half- Year Common School Review Class. 

A review of United States History, Georgia History and Civics. 
A rapid review of the civilization of our country, organization 
of our government, great men and movements of state and nation. 
Emphasis is placed on modern methods of study, the aim of the 
work is thorough preparation for the teacher's examination. 

Text-books used: Forman's History of the United States; James 
& Sanford, Our Government; Lawton B. Evans, History of Geor- 
gia. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the semester. 



Freshman Class. 

An elementary course in English History. The aim of the 
course is sound and thorough knowledge of the facts of English 
governmental growth as a basis for our own history. 

Text-book: Cheney's Short History of England. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Sophomore (lass. 

An elementary course in European History. The aim of the 
course is understanding of the origins of great institutions. 
Text-book: Robinson's History of Western Europe. 



Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 



Junior Class. 

An advanced course in Civics. The aim of the course is to 
understand the origins and functions of our government. 
Text-book: Forman's Advanced Civics. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the first semester. 

Senior Class. 

A rapid review of United States History. The aim of the 
course is to prepare for teaching in the common schools. 
Text-book: Montgomery's Student's American History. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the second semester. 



DEPARTMENT OE GEOGRAPHY AND NATURE STUDY. 
GEOGRAPHY. 



F. A. MERRILL. 
MISS JESSIE REDD. 



Geography is now recognized as a collegiate study in the best 
schools of this and foreign countries. All of the important train- 
ing schools of college rank in Germany and France offer advan- 
ced work along this line. The demand for a thorough and more 
extensive knowledge of earth formations and earth conditions 
that have controlled man's civilization is strongly felt in the 
educational life of today. The Normal School offers a regular 
course in geography to prepare the teacher for the usual re- 
quirements of the state common schools and an elective course 
that gives greater opportunities to increase individual knowledge 
and culture along lines of geographic thought. 

Half- Year Common School Review Class. 

The aim sought in this geography course is to give a general 
review of primary geography, emphasizing the great world move- 
ments in their relations to man's development. A thorough 
familiarity of geographic fact and data is necessary to a right 
teaching of the subject. 

The text-book used will be Frye's Higher Geography. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the semester. 



40 



Certificate Course. 

The work in this course will follow largely that pursued in 
the Half-Year Common School Review course. Much stress will 
be laid upon the pedagogy of geography teaching. 

The text-book used will be Frye's Higher Geography. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the first semester. 

Freshman Class. 

The work of the first semester consists of a rapid review of 
the common school geography to prepare the student in those 
essential features that are necessary to a full understanding of 
more advanced geographic study. 

The text-book used will be Redway and Hinman's Natural 
School Geography (larger book). 

Three periods a week throughout 
the first semester. 

The work of the second semester consists of a study of the 
elements of physical geography with introductory work in a 
laboratory manual. 

The text-books used will be Hopkins' Elements of Physical 
Geography and Merrill's Field and Laboratory Manual in Physical 
Geography. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the second semester. 

Sophomore (lass. 

The subjects of land structure, physiographic agencies and 
bio-geography will be treated in the first semester. More elab- 
orate laboratory work will be required and such field observa- 
tions as possible will be undertaken. 

The text-books used will be the same as in the second semester 
of the Freshman Class. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the first semester. 

In order to lx> excused from taking the Freshman and Sopho- 
more course, a student must present.to tin 1 head of tin- department 
a class record from an accredited high school averaging 7"> per 

(••■ill. and at least 40 laboratory exercises completed. 

Junior < lass. 

The required work in this class will be along the line of geo- 
graphic method with as much incidental review of tic subject 



H 



matter as the exigencies of the class-room may demand. The 
work undertaken will be finished in the first semester. 

The text-book used will be Sutherland's The Teaching of 
Geography. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the first semester. 

No regular student will be excused from taking this course. 

Electives in Geography. 
Junior Class. 

A course in commercial geography embracing a study of those 
physiographic and ontographic agents that have influenced trades 
and industries, the rise and growth of great trade centers, the 
distribution of natural resources and the location of the common 
trade routes. This course is open to those who have completed 
Freshman and Sophomore class work. 

The text-book used will be Gregory, Keller and Bishop's Physi- 
cal and Commercial Geography. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Senior Class. 

In the first semester a detailed study of the physiography of 
the United States will be undertaken with especial reference to 
its influence upon plant and animal distribution and the location 
of the natural resources of the country. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the first semester. 

In the second semester a course in the conservation of national 
resources will be offered. This will be a lecture and text-book 
course, frequent references being made to government bulletins 
and publications. 

The text-book used will be Gregory's Checking the Waste. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the second semester. 

NATURE STUDY. 

Review Class. 

The work in Nature Study will cover a common knowledge of 
those natural things about us as a preparation to a fuller under- 



42 



standing of nature's laws. As much outdoor work as is practi- 
cable will be undertaken. 

The text-book used will be Merrill's What to Teach in Nature 
Study. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Half- Year Common School Review Class. 

A review of the text-book required by the State School Super- 
intendent will be undertaken with as much field and laboratory 
work as time will permit. A general knowledge of plants and 
animals, their life habits and economic values, is an essential 
to any teacher of this subject. 

The text-book used will be Hodge's Nature Study and Life. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the semester. 

Certificate Course. 

The work in this course will follow largely that required in 
the Half-Year Common School Review Class. Much stress will 
be laid upon the pedagogy of Nature Study teaching. 

The text-book used will be Hodge's Nature Study and Life. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the second semester. 

Senior (lass. 

In this class it is intended to treat the subject more from the 
standpoint of methods of presentation. Work in the different 
grades of the schools will be studied and planned in outline form. 

The text-books used will be Merrill's What to Teach in Nature 
Study. Two periods a week throughout 

the second semester. 



>i:i\\ktmext 01 \ai\u ii/n ire. 



E. S. SELL. 
ALEXANDER RHODES. 



Tin country school teacher who is really interested in country 
Lie, who has some knowledge of agriculture can make the coun- 



44 



try school a fit place for the country child: such a teacher and 
no other can do it. For this reason we have courses in agriculture 
at the State Normal School. 

The school garden is a large item in the present day teaching 
of agriculture in the public schools, therefore the school garden 
is one of our laboratories. School garden work is done in the 
fall and in the spring. There are one hundred and fifty plots 
in th^ school garden where the students study plants from germ- 
ination to maturity. In the school garden there is also a large 
hot-bed where plants are grown in the winter and tender plants 
are started for early spring planting. 

The greater part of the laboratory work is outlined for the 
Junior class. This consists of exercises with rocks, soils, seeds 
and plants. Different kinds of soils are examined for their physi- 
cal characteristics and tested for their water-holding capacity, 
the capillary power and the effect of mulches and lime on soiis. 
Experiments are made with plants to show that they get food 
from the air and the soil, to show how roots take in moisture 
and that leaves give off moisture. This is a laboratory course, 
worked out to fit Georgia needs and conditions, for which our own 
laboratory manual is used. 

A course in poultry has just been added to the course of study 
and is made optional for the Seniors. A student is given charge 
of the yards for a week, hence a practical as well as a theoretical 
knowledge is gained about poultry raising. The house for the 
chickens has just been erected, and is 12x4 2 feet, with four runs, 
each 8x5 feet. Two breeds of chickens are kept, an egg breed 
and a general purpose breed. The incubator is used principally 
for hatching so that the student may become familiar with in- 
cubators and brooders. 

Half- Year Common School Review (lass. 

Elementary Agriculture. This cours-? consists of a study of the 
soil, the relation of Tbe soil to the plant, the plant, and how it 
s from the air and soil. Crafting. Pruning. Farm Crops and 
Domestic Animals. The text will be. supplemented with demon- 
strations by the instructor and the students will go into the fields 
lor pi actical observations. 

Text: Agriculture for Beginners, by Burkett, Stevens and Hill. 

Two periods a week throughout 

the year. 



fc5 



Freshman ( lass. 

Elementary Agriculture. The work in Elementary Agriculture 
for the Freshman class will be the same as that for the Half-Year 
Common School Review, and will be given the first half-year. 
The second half-year the Freshman will study Vegetable Garden- 
ing. The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with 
Vegetables that can be profitably grown in the South, and their 
method of culture, as well as the enemies of garden crops. Some 
time will be given to the study of Hot-beds and Cold-frames. 

Text: Truck Farming in the South, by A. Oemler. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Sophomore Class. 

Agricultural Botany. On account of the limited time that can 
be given to Botany it will be made as practical as possible and 
closely related to the work in Agriculture. A study will be made 
of Seeds, Germination and Growth and the function of the Roots, 
Stem and Flower. The laws of Plant Breeding and the means of 
improving plants will also be taken up. 

Text: Practical Course in Botany, by E. F. Andrews. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the second semester. 

Junior Class. 

Soils and School Gardening. The text that will be used in this 
course will deal with such subjects as the Soil Builders, the 
nature of Soils, the kinds of Soils and how to manage them, the 
benefits of Tillage, Drainage, Irrigation, the Maintaining of Soil 
Fertility, Farm Manures and Commercial Fertilizers. In the 
early fall and spring the student will be engaged in School Garden 
work while at other times she will be doing Laboratory work 
with Soils and Plants. 

Text: Soils, by Fletcher. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Senior Class. 

Field Crops. A detailed study will be made of Corn, Cotton, 
and Oats. The order of the study will be arranged as follows: 
The structure of the seed, the composition, the different varieties 
of the crop, how to improve them, the soil best adapted to the 

46 



crop as well as its place in a rotation, the cultivation, the harvest- 
ing and the enemies. 

Text: Southern Field Crops, by Duggar. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the first semester. 

Optional for Seniors. 

Poultry. The different breeds of chickens, the construction of 
houses, Incubators and Brooders will be taken up in this course. 
Each student will have charge of the Poultry yard for one week 
and will do as much practical work with Incubators and Brooders 
as possible. 

Text: Bulletins from the Department of Agriculture and Ex- 
periment Stations. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the first semester. 



DEPARTMENT OF LATIN. 



MISS IDA A. YOUNG. 



The aim of this course is not only to obtain mastery of forms 
by insistent drills in paradigms and vocabularies with a view to 
translation, but also to secure mental discipline, improvement in 
English, and the benefits to be derived from a study of the con- 
tents on the literary, historical, ethical and aesthetic sides. 

Review Class. 

The work in this class is planned for beginners, and for those 
who wish to review the subject. 
Text: Potter's Elementary Latin. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Freshman Class. 

Work for first half year will he readings from Nepos, lives of 
Hannibal and Themistocles. Second half year. Caesar, Hook IV, 
First Invasion of Britain, Chaps. 20-35; Hook V, Second Invasion 



48 



of Britain, Chaps. 1-2 3; Book IV, First Invasion of Germany, 
Chaps. 1-19. These chapters are chosen because the indirect dis- 
course passages are less difficult than in Book I, and also because 
they give accounts of campaigns against early British ancestors. 
Text: Lindsay's Lives of Nepos, Caesar. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Sophomore Class. 

I, II, III Orations Against Cataline; I, Orations for Achias. 
Composition work based upon Cicero, by D'Ooge. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Junior Class. 

Work in Virgil; I, II, IV, VI Books of Aeneid. The aim sought 
in the study of Virgil is to make the students realize that they 
are studying a great literature, one to which literature in general 
is indebted. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Senior Class. 

First half year, select Odes from Horace. Second half year, 
Livy. Grammar Reviews. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 



DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN AM) GREEK. 



MISS HELEN L. SPROUT. 
GERMAN. 



Freshman Class. 

German I. The course consists of careful drill upon pronuncia- 
tion, the inflection of the articles, of such nouns as belong to the 
language of every-day life, of pronouns, adjectives, weak verbs, 
and the more usual strong verbs, also upon the use of the modal 



49 



auxiliaries, and word order. Translation from English into Ger- 
man and the reading of 75-100 pages of easy prose. 

The text-book used will be Kellar's First Year in German. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Sophomore Class. 

German II. The reading of from 150-200 pages of literature in 
the form of easy stories and plays; continued drill upon the rudi- 
ments of grammar; sight translation and conversation. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 
Junior Class. 

German III. The advanced course (not compulsory), com- 
prises the reading of about 300 pages of good literature in prose 
and poetry, and reference reading upon the lives and works of 
the great writers. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

GREEK. 

Freshman Class. 

Greek I. This course gives special attention to elementary 
syntax with the principal parts of about one hundred common 
irregular verbs. There is also practice in reading at sight. 
The text-book used will be White's First Greek Book. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the year. 
Sophomore Class. 

Greek II. The reading of Books I and II Xenophon's Anabasis, 
with grammatical review. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the year. 



DEPARTMENT OF FRENCH AND SPANISH. 



JOSEPH LUSTRAT. 



First Year. 



Introductory French Course based upon Natural Method. Care- 
ful study of pronunciation. Grammar and Syntax studied from a 

50 



practical, rather than a theoretical, standpoint. Translation of 
English into French. Letter-writing. Reading of easy French 
prose. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Second Year. 

Continuation of study of Grammar and Syntax. Translation 
from English into French. Composition writing. Continuation 
of conversational French. Reading in the class-room, or outside, 
of novels written by the best French authors. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Third Year. 

Not required, and offered only to those students who have com- 
pleted the two-year course in the Normal School, or other institu- 
tion of learning. Grammatical difficulties, rhetoric, writing of 
essays in French. Studies of the classics, prose and poetry, with 
lectures delivered in French by the Professor in this course. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 
Note. — Text-books to be used in the different classes are an- 
nounced at the beginning of the scholastic year. 

A course in Spanish will be offered if a class of ten students is 
formed. 



DEPARTMENT OF DOMESTIC ARTS AND SCIENCE. 



MISS EDNA M. RANDALL. 
MISS PARNA B. HILL. 
MRS. NELLIE DUSENBURY. 
MISS REBECCA STEWART. 



That housekeeping should be regarded as a profession, and 
that every young woman needs as definite a training for her fu- 
ture work in the home as a young man does for his in the business 
world, are facts which do not require demonstration. The 
Department of Domestic Arts and Science offers the opportunity 

51 



for this much-needed and many-sided training to every young 
woman in the State Normal School. 

Freshman Class. 

((/) Model' Sewing. Includes the making of a series of models 
illustrating practical and ornamental stitches. Examples, hem- 
ming, darning, patching, gathering, plackets, seams, button-holes, 
application of lace, insertion and embroidery, hemstitching, feath- 
erstitching. The work, mounted in permanent form, must be 
submitted with a note-book to the instructor. The purpose of 
the course is to develop accuracy, neatness and skill, and to be 
suggestive of simple sewing lessons which can be given pupils in 
rural and graded schools. Fee, $2.00 per year. 

Two periods a week during 
first semester. 

(b) Plain Sewing follows Model Sewing. Simple pattern draft- 
ing to measurement under supervision of the instructor. A 
series of simple garments are made — a cooking apron and three 
or four pieces of underwear. Materials furnished by students. 

Two periods a week during 
second semester. 

(c) Home Administration. A detailed study of the problems 
connected with the heating, lighting, and ventilation of the 
house, disposal of wastes, division of income and keeping of 
household accounts; a consideration of the functions of the home 
in maintaining the health and efficiency of the family. 

Two periods a week during 
first semester. 

Sophomore Class. 

a. Elementary Cookery. Fundamental principles of cookery 
with emphasis upon right habits of work. The theory of and 
practice in the preparation of cereals, breads, pastries, meats, 
fish, salads, sandwiches, cakes, frozen deserts, etc. Fee, $2 per 
year. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

b. Food Study. Closely correlated with Elementary Cookery. 
A lecture and recitation course including a study of the physiol- 
ogy of digestion and absorption followed by a detailed study of 

52 



typical foods: e. g., cereals, legumes, sugars, starches, meats, 
milk, cheese, eggs, green vegetables, fruits. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Junior Class. 

(a) Household Chemistry. A laboratory course including a 
study of the food principles and analysis of typical foods: e. g., 
water, baking powders, eggs, milk, etc. Experiments in artificial 
digestion, removal of stains, and tests for food adulterations. 
Fee, $2 a year. Two periods a week throughout 

the year. 

(h) Advanced Sewing and Dressmaking. Prerequisite: Model 
and Plain Sewing. Continued study of patterns and pattern 
drafting. During the year students will draft patterns for and 
make to their own measurement a tailored shirtwaist and skirt, 
wool skirt and two dresses of wash material. The Snow System 
of Pattern Drafting is used. Cost of System, with instruction 
books, $3. Fee for course, 50 cents in addition to above, each 
semester. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Senior Class. 

(a) Advanced Cooking and Serving. Prerequisite: Elementary 
Cookery. The study of and practice in canning and preserving 
of fruits and vegetables, the preparation of the more difficult 
forms of breads, pastry, meats, salads, desserts, etc. 

Study of the making of menus, with practice in the serving of 
meals. The class is divided into groups of four, one of which 
plans a menu, prepares and serves a complete meal each week. 
The cost must come within a definite sum. Fee, $2 a year. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

(h) Dietetics. Prerequisite: Elementary Cookery and Food 
Study. A lecture and laboratory course. Study of energy, pro- 
tein and mineral requirement, effect of age, sex, and occupation 
on food requirement, infant and child feeding, diet in disease, the 
planning of menus with reference to bodily needs and cost. 

Two periods a week for 
26 weeks. 



54 



typical foods: e. g., cereals, legumes, sugars, starches, meats, 
milk, cheese, eggs, green vegetables, fruits. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Junior Class. 

(a) Household Chemistry. A laboratory course including a 
study of the food principles and analysis of typical foods: e. g., 
water, baking powders, eggs, milk, etc. Experiments in artificial 
digestion, removal of stains, and tests for food adulterations. 
Fee, $2 a year. Two periods a week throughout 

the year. 

(b) Advanced Sewing and Dressmaking. Prerequisite: Model 
and Plain Sewing. Continued study of patterns and pattern 
drafting. During the year students will draft patterns for and 
make to their own measurement a tailored shirtwaist and skirt, 
wool skirt and two dresses of wash material. The Snow System 
of Pattern Drafting is used. Cost of System, with instruction 
books, $3. Fee for course, 50 cents in addition to above, each 
semester. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Senior Class. 

(a) Advanced Cooking and Serving. Prerequisite: Elementary 
Cookery. The study of and practice in canning and preserving 
of fruits and vegetables, the preparation of the more difficult 
forms of breads, pastry, meats, salads, desserts, etc. 

Study of the making of menus, with practice in the serving of 
meals. The class is divided into groups of four, one of which 
plans a menu, prepares and serves a complete meal each week. 
The cost must come within a definite sum. Fee, $2 a year. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

(h) Dietetics. Prerequisite: Elementary Cookery and Food 
Study. A lecture and laboratory course. Study of energy, pro- 
tein and mineral requirement, effect of age, sex, and occupation 
on food requirement, infant and child feeding, diet in disease, the 
planning of menus with reference to bodily needs and cost. 

Two periods a week for 
26 weeks. 



54 



(c) Organization and Management of Domestic Science and 
Art Classes. The history of Domestic Science in the United 
States, Courses of Study, Equipment, and Cost of Maintenance. 
Lecture and recitation. 

Two periods a week for 
10 weeks. 

(d) Home Economics. Lecture Course. Required subject. 
This course of one period per week is required of all students in 
Senior classes. It will be devoted to a discussion of practical 
problems connected with the economic and social aspect of 
home life. 

One period a week throughout 
the year. 

Two- Year Elective Diploma. 

First Year. 

Students in the Two-Year Elective Course may take either 
four or eight periods per week of Domestic Arts and Science. For 
those taking four periods the course is the same as for Freshmen; 
the eight periods include both Freshman and Sophomore work. 

Second Year. 

(a) Elementary Cookery. 

(b) Food Study. 

See Sophomore course. 

Those students who in the first year take the Freshman and 
Sophomore courses may in the second year elect: 

(a) Advanced Cooking and Serving. 

(b) Advanced Sewing and Dressmaking. 

(c) Household Chemistry. 

(See outlines for Junior and Senior classes). 

(d) Home Economics Lecture Course. 

One period per week required of all students. See Senior Course. 

Certificate Course in Household Economy. 

In response to a demand for special teachers of Domestic 
Arts and Science in many schools of the State, the following two- 
year course leading to a Certificate in Household Economy is this 
year offered for the first time. 

Requirements for Entrance. Before entering upon this course 
students must take the work of the Freshman and Sophomore 
years, or present credits for their equivalent. See requirements 
for entrance to Two-Year Elective Diploma Course. 



56 



First Year. 



First Semester. 

Model Sewing 2 

Home Administration ... 2 

Cooking 2 

Food Study 2 

Household Chemistry ... 2 

Elementary Chemistry ... 4 

Psychology 4 

Agriculture 2 



Second Semester. 



Sewing 

Cooking 

Food Study 

Household Chemistry . 
Elementary Chemistry 
History of Education . 

Methods 

Agriculture and 

School Gardening . 



20 



21 



Second Year. 



First Semester. 

Advanced Sewing 2 

Advanced Cooking 2 

Dietetics 2 

Home Economics 1 

Child Study 2 

Principles of Education ... 3 

School Gardening 2 

Physiology 2 

Practice Teaching 4 

Conference 1 



Second Semester. 

Advanced Sewing 2 

Advanced Cooking 2 

Dietetics and Organization 

and Management 2 

Home Economics 1 

School Man. and Supervision 3 

Prac. School and Methods . 4 

Conference . . '. 1 

Agri. and School Gardening 2 



21 



17 



Students must elect four periods in addition from either the 
Manual Arts or Music Departments to make a total of not less 
than 21 periods per week. 

For fees and outline of work, see Four-Year Course. 



DEPARTMENT OF MANUAL ARTS. 



MISS ANNIE LINTON. 
MISS MAUDE TOWNSEND. 



The courses in Manual Arts have been planned to meet the 
present demand of the schools of the state. As time goes on this 
subject will come more and more into prominence, finally be- 
coming a required subject in every school curriculum. So the 
student who goes out thoroughly equipped with this training, 



58 



will find not only desirable positions more easy of attainment, 
but her field of usefulness greatly enlarged. 

Freshman Class. 

Elementary Drawing and Color. Object drawing in color and 
mass; mediums — pencil, brush and ink, colored crayons, and 
water color. Nature drawing with its principles of foreshorten- 
ing. Elements of design. Construction of portfolio for the appli- 
cation of design. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Sophomore Class. 

Elementary Arts and Crafts. This course includes mechanical 
drawing as applied to cardboard construction, basketry (including 
the use of Georgia material, such as wiregrass, long-leaf pine), 
pottery, clay modeling, and elementary woodwork. The student 
will be given ideas of good design in the application of design 
to the articles made. This work will result, it is hoped, in in- 
creased skill of hand, quickness of eye and mind, and last, but 
not least, appreciation of things artistic, things of good taste. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Junior Class. 

Drawing and Color, Composition. This will include more ad- 
vanced work in drawing, such as groups of objects, still-life, 
nature representation. Principles of design will be covered in 
the application of design to objects of use in the home and 
school. It aims at the cultivation of taste and of the imagination. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Elective Class, 

A condensed course, comprising, during the first semester, work 
in Elementary Arts and Crafts, and during the second semester, 
work in Drawing and Color, Composition and Design. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Senior Class. 

.Mechanical Drawing, including the making of working draw- 
ings for every article constructed in the woodworking shop, and 
the developing of blue-prints for the same. 



60 



Shop Work. Two or more of the following: book-rack, taboret, 
book shelves, screen. Study of wood stains and finishes. 

Design. Its application to inferior decoration and articles of 
home and school use. 

Theory of Manual Arts — As much as may be covered in the 
limited time. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the year. 

The fees charged in the Manual Arts department w T ill be $1.50 
each semester for each class. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL CULTURE. 



MISS ANNE P. KOLB. 
MISS ESTELLE POLAND. 



Requirements. 

All students are required to take the work in Physical Culture, 
which is two periods per week. No student is exempt from this 
work unless she brings an excuse from a reputable physician. 

Gymnasium Suits. 

Within two weeks after entrance each student must provide 
herself a gymnasium suit, consisting of bloomers (black pre- 
ferred), white blouse, and black tennis shoes. After this time 
no student will be allowed in the Gymnasium unless this suit is 
worn. Price of suit will be about $3.00. 

Gymnasium Work. 

The work of the Physical Culture Department consists of, — 
regular class-room exercises, folk games, athletics, tennis, basket- 
ball, and all forms of wholesome, harmless exercise, arranged for 
the physical welfare and development of the young women in the 
school. 

In the Senior class and Review class, normal work in class- 
room exercises and games is given. 

Physical Examination. 

Each student is given a careful physical examination twice 
a year, with a view to correcting defects of the body, and to 
note the general health of the student, together with her 
physical development. The reports of these examinations are 
kept on file in the Physical Director's office and may be referred 
to at any time. 

61 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC. 



MISS GERTRUDE ELIZABETH WOOD. 

MISS BESSIE MARY HARDY. 

MISS KATHRYN GARLAND HERRON. 

MRS. J. W. BAILEY. 

MRS. WM. BRUCE CARRIER. 

MISS KATE ELEANORE HODGSON. 



The department of Music offers a course in Piano, Voice, Har- 
mony, Violin and Common School Music. The aim in this depart- 
ment is to prepare special teachers of music as well as to give the 
common school teacher a thorough knowledge of how to present 
the subject of music in the school-room. 

Review Class. 

The Review class will take the same course in Common School 
Music as outlined for the Freshman class. 

Half- Year Common School Review Class. 

This class will have a short course in the elements of harmony, 
methods, rote songs and sight singing. 
Text: Modern Music Primer. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the semester. 

Freshman Class. 

I. Technical work. — Pitch names, syllables, time signatures, 
development of rhythm, clefs, notation. 

II. Major scale. — Tetra chord explanation, modulation, circle 
of keys, written work, melody writing. 

III. Musical terms. — Defined, abbreviations. 

IV. Musical form. — Vocal and instrumental, sonata, mass, 
oratorios, etc. 

V. Orchestration. — Classification of instruments. 

VI. Vocalization. — Tone placement, breathing, vocalizes. 

VII. Sight-singing. — One part, two part and interval drill. 

VIII. Rote songs, rounds, chorus work. 
XI. Chromatic scales, chromatic tones. 

X. Musical history. — Lectures on development of music, biog- 
raphies of European and American composers of note. 
Text used: Modern Music Primer. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 



62 



Junior Class. 

I. Minor scales. — Three forms written and sung. 

II. Intervals, classification of intervals, inversion. 

III. Vocalization. — Similar to previous year, children's voices 
studied, monotones. 

IV. Triads. — Primary triads written in all keys, cadences, 
harmonizing simple bass and melodies, transposing. 

V. Sight singing. — Two and three parts, musical dictation, 
ear-training, three-toned chord. 

VI. Rote songs. — Songs suitable for all grades. 

VII. Methods. — Primary, intermediate and grammar grades, 
directing of chorus. 

VIII. Practice teaching. — Lesson plans for all grades. 

All students in this course have the advantage of the chorus 
work in the Glee Clubs and also the monthly recitals of the 
piano and voice departments. 

Text used: Book I, Modern Music Series. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Senior Class. 

I. Enharmonic scales. 

II. Triads. — Inversion, figured bass, harmonizing of melodies 
and figured bass. 

III. Chords of the seventh, resolutions. 

IV. Opera. — Study of the development of opera, stories of 
operas and compositions. 

V. Sight-singing. — Four parts, advanced ear-training in minor 
keys. 

VI. High School Methods, chorus work. 

Text: Gilchrist's Sight Singing exercises; Matthew's Musical 
History. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Students may receive a Certificate in Common School Music 
who have completed the Freshman and Sophomore years in the 
Normal department and the three year course in Common School 
Music, with one year of voice culture, two periods per week, and 
two years of piano, two periods per week. 

The department of Music offers a course of private instruction 
in Piano, Voice, Violin and Harmony. The year is divided into 
four terms, nine weeks each. Tuition payable in advance at time 
dormitory fee is due. Piano practice included. 

63 



Piano, two periods each week $10.75 per term. 

Voice, two periods each week 10.75 per term. 

Violin, two periods each week 9.00 per term. 

Harmony, two periods each week. . . 9.00 per term. 

Voice. 

The course in Voice Culture includes proper placing of the voice,, 
breath control, relaxaxtion, phrasing, song interpretation, study of 
the best songs from old masters and modern composers, arias- 
from oratorios and operas. 

Vocalizes: Marchesi, Sieber Concone, Panofka, Randegger. 



COURSE OF STUDY FOR PIANO. 

Grade I and II. 

Matthews' Graded Course, grades 1 and 2; Kohler Op. 300,. 
249, 151, 157; Gurlitt, Op. 228, 82 and 83; Bellair, Elements 
of Piano Technique on a Rhythmic Basis; Duvernow, Op. 17 6 and 
120; LeCouppey, Op. 17; Burgmuller, Op. 100; Kiihner, School of 
Etudes; Low, Teacher and Pupil; Williams, Op. 43; Schmitt, Pre- 
paratory Exercises; Kunz 200, Two Part Canons; Loeschhorn, 
Op. 52 and 65. 

Grade III and IV. 

Mason, Touch and Technic; Herz, Technical Exercises; Loesch- 
horn, Op. 66, 67 and 136; LeCouppey, Op. 20; Plaidy, Technical 
Studies; Hasert, Op. 50; Czerny Op. 849, 299 and 553; Kiihner, 
School of Etudes; Bertini, 5 Selected Studies; Concone, Op. 30; 
Heller, 5 Selected Studies; Doring, Op. 24; Bach, Short Pre- 
ludes and Fugues, Two Part Inventions; Sonatinas by Bach,. 
Beethoven, Clementi, Kuhlau, Haydn, Mozart, Mendelssohn, and 
others. 

Grade V and VI. 

Zwintscher, Technical Exercises; Czerny, Op. 740; Cramer, 
Moscheles, and Chopin, Etudes; Kullak, Octave Studies; Clementi, 
Gradus ad Parnassum; Bach, Three Part Inventions; Sonatas by 
Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. 

Scales, arpeggio, and duet work will be given throughout the 
course, and pieces by the best composers will be used at the 
discretion of the teacher. 



(54 



A Certificate will be granted in Piano, Voice, Violin and 
Harmony upon a satisfactory completion of the course as out- 
lined. Students of Voice or Piano will be granted a Certificate 
if they have completed the Freshman and Sophomore years in the 
Normal department and have studied in this school two years, 
have had one year of common school music, and one year of 
harmony and musical history. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the course. 

Course in Harmony. 

Elements of harmony, cadences, harmonizing melodies and 
bass, figured bass chords of seventh and resolutions, applied 
harmony, counterpoint, chord analysis, modulation, transposing. 
Text: Chadwick's Harmony; White's Harmony and Ear-train- 
ing. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the course. 

Course in A 7 iolin. 

Exercises for flexibility, violin technics and scale studies. Stu- 
dents will also receive instruction in ear-training and rudimentary 
theory. Pieces selected from the classic and modern violin liter- 
ature. 

Glee Clubs are organized for the students. All students are 
expected to attend the monthly recitals of the department and 
also to join one of the two piano clubs. 



DEPARTMENT OF CORRESPONDENCE. 



MISS HELEN D. SPROUT, teacher in charge. 



Teaching by mail is becoming more popular every day, and the 
facilities have now been so perfected that there is no method of 
study which equals that of the correspondence plan for giving 
depth of scholarship and accurate knowledge of the subject 
studied. The State Normal School has so arranged its courses of 
study that all correspondence students will secure full credit for 
the work which they do at home should they decide eventually 
to attend the Normal School at Athens. 



65 



These courses are prepared by the heads of departments who 
are specialists in these branches. Directions as to text-books 
and lessons, and lists of review questions, will be sent the stu- 
dent. When the student writes out the answers to these ques- 
tions and sends in her papers, these will be corrected and graded 
and again returned to the student. Credit will be entered upon 
the records of the State Normal School for the work done, and 
this credit will help the student, who can come to the school later 
and take resident work, to obtain the diploma offered by this 
institution. 

The charges for the courses are as follows: 

Common School Review Course. General Culture Courses. 

Arithmetic $5.00 Algebra $6.00 

Grammar 5.00 Geometry 6.00 

History 5.00 Latin 6.00 

Physiology 5.00 Rhetoric 6.00 

Geography 5.00 Literature 6.00 

Agriculture 5.00 English History 6.00 

Reading 5.00 Ancient History 6.00 

Spelling 5.00 Civil Government .... 6.00 

General Pedagogical Courses. 

Dutton's "School Management," and Georgia School Law, $5.00 

A General Course on Primary Methods 5.00 

Other Courses in way of preparation. 

For full particulars in regard to any of these Courses of Study, 
address E. C. BRANSON, President, State Normal School, Athens, 
Ga. 



STATISTICS FOR 1911-1912. 

Students registered to date (April 9, 1912), 664; pupils in 
Muscogee Elementary School and Country School, 167; total 831; 
applicants turned away from lack of room, 82; teachers and 
officers, 47; counties represented by students, 106; students hold- 
ing diplomas from other schools, 163; students holding first-grade 
license, 75: second-grade license, 94; third-grade license, 47; 
students having experience in teaching, 203. Students who earn- 
ed the money they spend here, 181. Sixty per cent, of all our 
students are the sons and daughters of farmers. Calls on us for 
teachers, 1911-1912, 153. Total registration since tire founding 
of the school, 9,991; more than 90 per cent, of whom have since 
taught in our common-schools. Total graduates to June, 1911, 
609. Graduating class this year numbers 70. 

Buildings: Acacfemic buildings, 3; Dormitory buildings, 3; 
Dining Hall building and Senior Hall, 1; Carnegie Library, 1; 
Infirmary, 1; Dairy Barn, 1. Total 10. 



MUSCOGEE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 



Officers and Teachers. 

E. C. BRANSON, President. C. H. BRUCE, Director. 

MISS KATE E. HICKS, Principal. 

MISS MARJORIE FORD, Teacher of Seventh and Eighth Grades. 
MISS IRIS CALLAWAY, Teacher of Fifth and Sixth Grades. 
MISS ELIZABETH YOUNG, Teacher of Third and Fourth Grades. 
MISS MARY M. WOODS, Teacher of Second Grade. 
MISS LOUISE HEMINGWAY, Teacher of First Grade. 
MISS REBECCA STEWART, Teacher of Domestic Science. 
MISS ESSIE MITCHELL, Teacher of Rural School. 



The purpose of the Elementary School is to give to the Juniors 
and Seniors of the State Normal School an opportunity to observe 
and apply the best theories and methods in education, with the 
idea of putting these into practice in the schools of Georgia. 

Being under the immediate supervision of the Department of 
Pedagogy, an effort is made in this school to exemplify the prin- 
ciples and methods of education as taught in this department, 
and the special methods in elementary school branches as taught 
in the other departments of the State Normal School. 

The Elementary School is amply equipped with a shop, gym- 
nasium, kitchen, and a dining room, and the different class rooms 
are well supplied with modern appliances. 

The school is a well organized one of eight grades, and the 
course of study is planned to meet present needs in the life of 
the child, and to suit the interests of the various periods of 
child development. The work, so far as is practicable, is based 
upon present-day industries, and especially the industries which 
are taught in the school: Cooking, Gardening, Sewing, and Man- 
ual Training. The work is so correlated that time is not lost by 
giving attention to the industries, as students from the eighth 
grade of the Elementary School readily do the ninth grade work 
of any other school. The industrial work adds interest, and forms 
a basis for much of the formal work of the school. In addition 
to the industries already named, the course of study includes 
Reading, Writing, Spelling, Drawing, Painting, Language and 



68 



Grammar, Literature, Elementary Science, Geography, Arithmetic, 
Algebra, History, Music, and Physical Training. 

Before any student is permitted to do practice teaching in the 
Elementary School, the equivalent of academic and professional 
work as given in the Junior class of the State Normal School must 
be satisfactorily completed. 

The Senior class is divided into two sections; one section 
teaches while the other section makes plans for teaching. Prac- 
tice teaching is done four days in a week — sixteen lessons, forty- 
five minutes in length, constitute a month's teaching. Regular 
Seniors are required to teach three and one-half months in order 
to secure a certificate in teaching. 

Before teaching in the Elementary School each student-teacher 
is assigned a grade and a subject for one month, and is required 
to make, for her teaching, detailed plans which must be submit- 
ted to the critic teacher for correction. After the teaching assign- 
ment is made, four plans each week must be submitted to the 
critic teacher in charge, and eight plans must be accepted before 
any student-teacher will be permitted to teach. 

Before taking charge of any grade the student-teacher must 
observe at least eight lessons of the grade in which she is to 
teach, and, if possible, eight lessons of the subject which she is 
to teach. She must learn each child of the grade by name, and 
must learn the regular teacher's method of managing the grade. 

The practice teaching is done under the supervision of the 
regular critic teacher, the Director and Principal of the school 
exercising general supervision. 

In rating the student-teacher's ability, the critic-teacher con- 
siders the following points, or similar ones: 

1. General intelligence, knowledge of the subject matter, 
ability to select vital points in a lesson, and to concentrate teach- 
ing about these points. 

2. Earnestness, persistence, promptness, responsiveness to sug- 
gestions, attitude toward criticism, helpful school spirit. 

3. English expression, culture, courtesy, neatness, voice, car- 
riage, poise and confidence. 

4. Ability to manage children, getting and holding attention, 
handling disturbing elements, keeping all children profitably 
employed. 

r>. Initiative in planning, securing and using adequate mate- 
rials, care of materials, care of the room. 

6. Modes of conducting recitations, economizing time, definite 
purpose and end in view, corrections of the children's English, 
practice teaching and an exemplification of many of the above 
assignments of lessons. 



70 



Only upon a satisfactory completion of the required amount of 
practice teaching, and an exemplification of many of the above 
essential qualifications of the teacher, will Certificates in teaching 
be awarded. 

The Rural School Problem. 

Modern educational thought has centered about the city school; 
social and economic forces have developed the city more rapidly 
than the country which has resulted in a drift cf population from 
the country to the city thereby retarding the growth of the coun- 
try school and country life in general. 

As a means of helping to raise the standard of the rural schools 
of Georgia to meet the economic and social needs of modern rural 
life the Normal School has established a rural school in connec- 
tion with its Elementary School, in which its students are given 
an opportunity to study the rural school problems that they may 
thereby be better fitted for efficient service in these schools. 

It is our purpose with a model building and modern equipment 
to help in adjusting the rural school to the agricultural and do- 
mestic life of the country; to demonstrate ways in which a rural 
school may be the social center of community life; to adjust the 
course of study to rural conditions and interest; to study the 
problem of the consolidation of schools, and to show what may 
be done by one teacher in carrying out a modern course of study. 

With the growth of population in the vicinity of the school 
we propose to enlarge the building to meet the growing needs of 
the community. 



72 



STUDENT ASSOCIATIONS. 



THE YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

Advisory Board. 

Pres. E. C. Branson, Chairman. 
A. Rhodes, Treasurer. Miss Ida Young. 

F. A. Merrill. Miss Bessie Hardy. 

P. F. Brown. Miss Edna Randall. 

Miss Willie Fagan, General Secretary. 

Student Officers. 

President, Estelle Hughes. Secretary, Margaret Kendrick. 

Vice-President, Annie McGarity. Treasurer, Kathleen Knox. 

Chairmen of Committees. 

Bible Study — Corinne Scott. 
Mission Study- — Pearl Rainwater. 
Devotional — Annie Durham. 
Social — Frances Beach. 
Intercollegiate — Jannette Wallace. 



The Y. W. C. A., through its social life, Bible study, Mission 
study and intercollegiate relationships, seeks to promote a spirit 
of right living among students and to train them for Christian 
work. The social work consists of introducing new students to 
the school and of assisting them in adapting themselves to their 
new friends and surroundings. The Bible study course is arran- 
ged to cover four years, but if as much as two years is satisfactor- 
ily completed credit is given on the diploma issued by the school. 
This year 95 per cent, of the student body is enrolled. The course 
in Mission study is carefully planned and the text-books used are 
the newest and best, treating both home and foreign mission 
problems. Intercollegiate relationships have been established 
by delegations to the Georgia State Missionary League, and the 
Southern Conference of Young Women's Christian Association, 
by visits of traveling student secretaries and by the interchange 
of reports and methods with all the leading schools of the South. 



73 



WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN TEMPERANCE UNION. 



Officership. 

President, Mary Osterman. Secretary, Addie Frazer. 

Vice-Pres., Rosa Mercer. Treasurer, Jennie Kicklighter. 

Corresponding Secretary, Ruth Hodges. 



In conjunction with the other religious work of the school, 
there is an organized W. C. T. IT. which holds regular meetings 
once a month. This organization has done much to further the 
study of temperance and temperance questions that are pertinent 
to school life. 



THE ALTIORIA LITERARY SOCIETY. 



Officership. 

President, Lena Wootten. Secretary, Leverne Nelson. 

Vice-President, Eunice Lester. Critic, Willouise Whittenberg. 
Treasurer, Bonnie K. Barnett. Censor, Willie Rudisill. 



The Altiorias form a literary and social society that has made 
a special study the past year of modern plays and playrights. 



THE MILDRED RUTHERFORD SOCIETY. 



Officership. 

President, Addie Speights. Critic, Tillie Woolvin. 

Vice-President, Annie R. McGarity. Censor, Mamie Oxford. 

Secretary, Laura Home. Chaplain, Ludie Harris. 

Treasurer, Beryl Cadwell. 

Chairman Decorating Committee, Ella Brady. 

Chairman Music Committee, Ruth McWilliams. 



The Mildred Rutherford Society is a literary society, the aims 
of which are the cultivation of the literary sense, the betterment 
of the social life of the school and the cementing of friendships 
into strong usefulness in the future. 



74 



THE ALEXANDER ETIQUETTE CLUB. 



Officership. 



President, Addie Fraser. Vice-President, Lois Cliatt. 

Secretary, Maggie Wade. 



The Alexander Etiquette Club was organized for the purpose 
of pleasant social intercourse, for the study of pertinent ques- 
tions of etiquette, and for the inculcation of a love of, and a 
striving for, the highest forms of courtesy, under all circumstan- 
ces and in all conditions of life. 



THE ROUND TABLE. 



The Round Table is a gathering of all the students who desire 
to attend at a regular meeting every Saturday night just when 
supper is over. The organization is eight years old and its aim 
is to furnish wholesome recreation and to develop a love for and 
a power to tell the best stories to be found in our literature. 
Current topics are discussed, songs rendered and some pleasing 
story told and commented on. This organization started with 
but six members at its inception, and now has increased in size 
until there is no room on the school campus that will hold the 
attendance without crowding. 



THE CICEKOXEAX DE DATING SOCIETY. 



Officei'sliip. 



President, J. J. Osterman. Chaplain, C. L. Isbill. 

Vice-President, G. W. Parham. Sergeant-at-Arms, A. A. Browning. 
Secretary, C. V. Brown. Critic, G. R. Driggers. 



The Ciceronean Debating Society is an organization of the 
young men for the specific purpose of training in the subject of 
debate. Regular meetings are held once a week when current 
topics of vital interest are discussed and debated, occasional 



75 



trips being taken to other schools for debating contests. The 
work of this society has been of great benefit to the young men 
as it has given them much confidence in themselves and has de- 
veloped their platform abilities. 



THE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 



Officership. 



President, Kathleen Hines. 
Secretary, Emoline Baker. 
Treasurer, Tillie Woolvin. 



This is an association of the students of the school for the 
purpose of athletic training and is under the direct supervision 
of the Department of Physical Culture. The Association has an 
athletic field well equipped with six tennis courts, two basket- 
ball courts and room for track and relay races. An annual Field 
Day and championship tennis contests are held; the winners of 
the young men's tournament are sent to the Inter-collegiate 
tournament in Atlanta. 



THE YOUNG GEORGIA CLUB. 



The Young Georgia Club is a new and unique organization in 
the School. It is composed of 141 students and faculty members, 
who meet regularly on Mondays at 9 o'clock for an hour's in- 
formal, comfortable discussion of vital topics. This year the 
time has been spent upon a study of Rural Life Conditions: signs 
of decay, signs of progress; causes and consequences; curative 
and reparative remedies. Ninety-one counties of Georgia are 
represented in the student body this year. The detailed studies 
and reports of conditions in our State have yielded a body of 
valuable and stimulating information. The rising fever and 
fervor of patriotic citizenship in this club is inspiring and helpful. 

So many thoughtful people all over the state have been inter- 
ested in the work of the Georgia Club that it has been decided to 
elect 146 affiliated members, one from each county in the state, 
and to keep in close touch with this membership in the field. 

76 





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In some matters of research and bulletin work this year the 
Club has reached out into fields that are full of value to the 
people of the state for the present and for the future. The work 
of the Georgia Club, directed by the able members of the faculty, 
especially appeals to the thinking man who views the needs of 
his state — as a most valuable contribution to the effort to remedy 
evils, correct mistakes, and emphasize the good points in the 
conditions of social and economic relation in Georgia. 

The surveys made of the counties, one by one, in which many 
phases of life are analyzed in the light of dependable facts and 
figures, have been full of thought, full of material for considera- 
tion by thoughtful men and women, serious students of Georgia 
and teachers in Georgia schools. For two years the club has 
been studying the various phases and problems of Population, 
Agriculture, Manufacturing, Wealth and Taxation, Farm Owner- 
ship and Tenancy, Public Roads, Public Sanitation, Cooperative 
Farm enterprise, Schools and Churches in Georgia. 



E. C. Branson, President. 



Officers. 

F. A. Merrill, Secretary. 



Faculty Members. 

P. F. Brown. Estelle Poland. 

C. H. Bruce. Annie Linton. 

Louise Hemingway. Jessie Redd. 

T. E. Hollingsworth. A. Rhodes. 

Anne P. Kolb. E. S. Sell. 

Maude C. Townsend. Gertrude E. Wood. 



Ruby Anderson, 
Ruby Armstrong, 
Phoebe Broadrick, 
Lucinda Burke 
Ruth Bohler 
Brooksie Bowden, 
Ella Brady, 
C. V. Brown, 
Blanche Barnes, 
Mittie Brackett, 
Lillian Blair, 
Genie M. Baldwin, 



Members. 




Oconee 


K. S. Bell, 


Paulding 


Pulaski 


Fannie Bird, 


Newton 


Whitfield 


Eula Cowan, 


Douglas 


Burke 


Etta Cox, 


Cherokee 


Lincoln 


Sarah Callaway, 


Putnam 


Meriwether 


Clara Clarke, 


Floyd 


Sumter 


Liny Carter, 


Greene 


Douglas 


Ina Cooper, 


Clarke 


Cobb 


Seleta Carter, 


Cobb 


Jackson 


Perry Clegg, 


Walton 


Douglas 


Emma L. Champion, 


Crawford 


Morgan 


Irene Dunn, 


Hancock 



78 



Richard Dailey, 
Annie M. Durham, 
Georgia Daniel, 
Mrs. N. Dusenberry, 
Lizzie Edmondson, 
Ninnie Fields, 
Addie Fraser, 
Marion Foreman, 
Carol Frankum, 
Ruby Gillen, 
May Gilstrap, 
Cora Hubbard, 
Claude Harrison, 
Lula Hull, 
Dollie Hawthorne, 
Mary Hartnett, 
Thurza Harrison, 
Fannie Hall, 
Edna Hodges, 
Ruth Hodges, 
Annie Harris, 
Kathleen Hines, 
Texas Henderson, 
Kate Harper, 
Cosby Hubbard, 
Ludie Harris, 
C. L. Isbill, 
Grace Johnson, 
Lucile Jones, . 
Amy Jones, 
Mable Johnson, 
Elliece Johnson, 
Callie Jones, 
Alice Kincaid, 
Mattie Kitchen, 
Kathleen Knox, 
Eunice Lester, 
Lizzie Lester, 
Mary B. Manry, 
Rachel Maxwell, 
Pearl Mayfield, 
Jewell Morrison, 
Bennie Mills, 
Eva McGee, 
Blanche McGahee, 
Sal lie McGlamry, 



Paulding 

Greene 

Jackson 

Chatham 

Carroll 

Emanuel 

Liberty 

Thomas 

Franklin 

Clarke 

Milton 

Dawson 

Hancock 

Rockdale 

Gwinnett 

Pike 

Bibb 

Talbot 

Screven 

Screven 

Hart 

Harris 

Bibb 

Wilkes 

Cherokee 

Pike 

Whitfield 

Gordon 

Mitchell 

Dawson 

Gordon 

Oglethorpe 

Dawson 

Spalding 

Emanuel 

Telfair 

Bulloch 

Campbell 

Calhoun 

Richmond 

Gwinnett 

Pickens 

Clay 

Crawford 

Early 

Worth 



Minnie Olive, 
Frank J. Osterman, 
Grace Palmer, 
Blyde Pettey, 
Josie Pitts, 
Ethel Pritchett, 
Louise Quarterman, 
Tassie Reed, 
Cleo Rainwater, 
Sue Mae Riggins, 
Ella Rucker, 
Myrtie B. Reid, 
Pearl Rainwater, 
Cora Sutton, 
Inez Stewart, 
Dora Snead, 
Bertha Smith, 
Lerah Smith, 
Etna Shirley, 
Leda Slaton, 
Julia Schley, 



Talbot 

Charlton 

Whitfield 

Clarke 

Colquitt 

Pulaski 

Oconee 

Haralson 

Wilcox 

Pike 

Elbert 

Haralson 

Wilcox 

Habersham 

Newton 

Fayette 

Talbot 

Walton 

Milton 

Taylor 

Chattahoochee 



Aurelia Shellnut, Walton 

Lucy K. Sappington, Troup 

May Sappington, Pike 

Addie Speights, Baldwin 

Constance Schley, Muscogee 
Theodosia Sinquefield, Twiggs 

Jewell Smith, Butts 

Corinne Scott, Cobb 

Holland Strother, Lincoln 
Lillian Schley, Chattahoochee 

Grace Tayler, Milton 

Lillie Turner, Gwinnett 

Nelle Tisinger, Carroll 

Mary Tisinger, Carroll 

Jennie Usher, Screven 

Floy Usher, Screven 

Mad a Wyant, Screven 

•Clara Williams, Cobb 

Lena Wooten, Wilkes 

Louise Waller, Hancock 

Ida Wade, Crisp 

Mattie Lou White, Worth 

Blanche Youngblood Marion 

Temple Zeigler, Screven 



79 



NORMAL GLEE CLUB. 



Officers. 



Gertrude Wood, Director. 

Julia Hill, President. 

Marion Foreman, Sec'y and Treasurer. 

Clara Clark, Librarian. 



Chloe Allen. 
Ruby Anderson. 
Mittie Brackett. 
Hunter Berry. 
Rachel Culpepper. 
Clara Clark. 
Eva Crovett. 
Ina Cooper. 
Sara Callaway. 
Waudie Dunn. 
Georgia Daniel. 
Marion Foreman. 
Jane Lou Floyd. 
Carol Frankum. 
Rebecca Griffin. 
Alma Guill. 
Launa Harper. 
Ruth Hodges. 
Julia Hill. 
Mary Hartnett. 
Ludie Harris. 
Fannie Isbill. 
Lois Johnson. 



Ellie Jones. 
Ruby Kennedy. 
Mattie Lou Kemp. 
Mattie Kitchen. 
Loretta LaMotte. 
Elizabeth Lumsden. 
Sarah Morris. 
La Verne Nelson. 
Lee Norris. 
Mary Osterman. 
Mamie Oxford. 
Blyde Pettey. 
Ruby Porter. 
Lillie Peterson. 
Jewel Poore. 
Estelle Poland. 
Clio Rainwater. 
Sue Mae Riggins. 
Theodosia Sinquefield. 
Etna Starr. 
Jewel Smith. 
Bertha Mae Smith. 
Mae Vickery. 



ALTIORH GLEE CLUB. 



Officers. 



Julia Hill, President. 

Kathleen Hines, Sec'y and Treasurer. 

Loretta LaMotte, Librarian. 



Emoline Baker. 
Lillian Blair. 



Members. 

Elizabeth Branch. 
Estha Bowden. 



Frances Beach. 
Brooksye Bowden. 
Bonnie Kate Barnette. 
Lois Cliatt. 
Emmie Cliatt. 
Clara Clark. 
Sara Callaway. 
Katie Downs. 
Waudie Dunn. 
Jane Dorough. 
Willie Mae Edmondson. 
Addie Fraser. 
Kate Groves. 
Lucile Gresham. 
Nannie Gresham. 
Launa Harper. 
Evelyn Henry. 
Maude Hitt. 
Kathleen Hines. 
Julia Hill. 
Annie Hood. 
Fannie Isbill. 
Callie Jones. 
Floyd Johnson. 
Kathleen Knox. 



C. B. Kelley. 
Jennie Kicklighter. 
Alice Kincaid. 
Loretta LaMotte. 
Edna McKinney. 
Rosa Mercer. 
La Verne Nelson. 
Ruby Porter. 
Estelle Poland. 
Jewell Poore. 
Willie Rudisill. 
Myrtie Reid. 
Tassie Reid. 
Julia Schley. 
Lillian Schley. 
Constance Schley. 
Ruth Stone. 
Emily Sone. 
Mattie Smith. 
Theodosia Sinquefield. 
Bessie Tyner. 
Lillie Turner. 
Lula Tribble. 
Kate Thornton. 
Mae Vickery. 



MILDRED RUTHERFORD GLEE CLUB. 



Officers. 



Ruth McWilliams, President. 
Annie Harris, Secretary. 
Kate Harper, Treasurer. 

Members. 



Luna Baker. 
Bessie Brady. 
Bessie Bruce. 
Georgia Daniel. 
.Marion Foreman. 
Carroll Franklin. 
Alma Guill. 



Laura Home, 
Kate Harper. 
Cora Hubbard. 
Ludie Harris. 
Winnie Harvey. 
Annie Harris. 
Texas Henderson. 



M 



Mary Hartnett. Hollis Moorhead. 

Lois Johnson. Lee Norris. 

Nora Jones. Mamie Oxford. 

Ellie Jones. Sue Mae Riggins. 

Mattie Lou Kemp. Addie Speight. 

Nannie Mae Kinnebrew. Alice Speight. 

Ethel Landrum. Mary Sanders. 

Bessie Lowery. Bessie Smith. 

Bennie Mills. Agnes Snelson. 

Annie Reid McGarity. Tillie Woolvin. 

Rachel Maxwell. Nellie Williams. 

Ruth McWilliams. Ella Waters. 



MALE GLEE CLUB. 



H. A. Baker, President. 

C. V. Brown, Vice-President. 

P. J. Osterman, Sec'y and Treasurer. 



H. A. Baker. G. W. Parham. 

C. V. Brown. S. Rosser. 

C. L. Isbill. W. E. Taylor. 

F. J. Osterman. G. C. Watkins. 



EUTERPIAN CLUB. 

Mrs. Bailey and Miss Hardy, Directors. 

Officers. 

Ada Jane Dolan, President. 
Rachel Maxwell, Vice-President. 
Emmie Cliatt, Secretary. 
Waudie Dunn, Treasurer. 



iTOUNG PIANISTS' CLUB. 

Miss Katheryn Herron, Director. 

Officers. 

.Jennie Kicklighter, President. 
Kate Thornton, Vice-President. 
Alma Guill, Secretary. 
Vera Morrison, Treasurer. 



82 





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ROLL OF STUDENTS, SESSION 1911-12. 





REVIEW 


CLASS. 




Lydia Adams, 


Bartow 


Alva Eavenson, 


Elbert 


Mary Emma Adams, 


Newton 


Cleo Evans, 


Jackson 


Robt. L. Austin, 


Coweta 


Maude Eavenson, 


Elbert 


Corinne Balchin, 


Elbert 


Janie Lou Floyd, 


Monroe 


Hattie L. Blanchard, 


Richmond 


Minnie Fields, 


Emanuel 


Mattie Brides, 


Oconee 


Villie Fowler, 


Gwinnett 


Mattie Brooks, 


Jackson 


Woffle Floyd, 


Gordon 


Lucinda Burke, 


Screven 






J. N. Bryan, 


Gwinnett 


Late Gaines, 


Hart 


W. C. Britt, 


Gwinnett 


Fannie Gibbons, 


Floyd 


Lena Bell, 


Butts 


lone Grubbs, 


Spalding 


Lee Byrd, 


Greene 


Annie Googe, 


Wilcox 


Esther Bowden, Meriwether 


Alice Gordon, 


Wilcox 


Nellie Cannon, Chattahoochee 


Clara Harrell, 


Decatur 


May Belle Cherry, 


Fulton 


Marie Harrison, 


Washington 


Annie Delpha Chesser 


, Gwinnett 


Rebecca Hill, 


Wilkes 


Perry Clegg, 


Walton 


Edna Hodges, 


Screven 


Rosalie Coleman, 


Worth 


Catherine Holton, 


Mitchell 


Ruth Comer, 


Jones 


Maggie Hope, 


Banks 


Iris L. Conoway, 


Clarke 


Carrie Hudgins, 


Baker 


Mellie Chambers, 


Banks 


Lula Hull, 


Rockdale 


Eula Cowan, 


Douglas 


Ethel Hutchins, 


Walton 


Willie May Camp, 


Gwinnett 


Blanche Hinchliffe, 


Meriwether 


Liny Carter, 


Greene 


Clara Hussey, 


Oconee 


Kate Carpenter, 


Burke 


Annie Hussey, 


Oconee 


Mattie Lee Clark, Clay Co., Ky. 


Johngeline Jewett, 


Jones 


Mattie Lou Davis, 


Jackosn 


lone Jones, 


Liberty 


Blanford Dixon, 




Jewell Jones, 


Grady 


Panama 


City, Fla. 


Agnes Jones, 


Liberty 


Izetta De Vore, 


Cherokee 


Ellie Jones, 


Colquitt 


Mary Emmett, 


Bulloch 


Minnie Johnson, 


Meriwether 


A. B. Elizer, 


Jasper 


Mattie Lou Kemp, 


Mitchell 


Nellie Everett, 


Bulloch 


Mattie Kitchen, 


Emanuel 



84 



Alma Knight, 



Gwinnett Annie Reeves, 



Burke 



Hermie Lane, 
Attis Lariscy, 
Elizabeth Lester, 
Ruth Little, 
Marie Logue, 
Sallie Lowe, 
Maude Logan, 
Atty Logue, 
F. M. Logan, 



Polk 

Screven 

Campbell 

Monroe 

Hancock 

Jackson 

Clarke 

Hancock 

Jackson 



Lily McDaniel, Laurens 

Thomas W. McDaniel, Gwinnett 
Blanche McGahee, Early 



Norma Martin, 
Pearl Mayneld, 
Eva Morgan, 
Blanche Massey, 
Jewell Morrison, 
Ruby Morris, 
Gussie Moore, 
Verna Meadows, 

Elva Newton, 



Jackson 

Gwinnett 

Chattahoochee 

Hart 

Pickens 

Brooks 

Elbert 

Oglethorpe 



Addie Pullen, 
Hattie Belle Patrick, 
Jewell Poore, 
Gertrude Pickrell, 
Ella Louise Parker, 
Stella Poston, 
G. W. Parham, 
Patrick Phillips, 

Zada Rushing, 
Roberta Roberts, 
Myrtle Roper, 
Ella Rucker, 
Wylene Rumble, 



Colquitt 

Mitchell 

Newton 

Mitchell 

Clarke 

Screven 

Clarke 

Jackson 

Franklin 

Bulloch 

Bibb 

Cherokee 

Elbert 

Monroe 



Lucy K. Sappington, Harris 


Nelle Shepard, 


Haralson 


Theodosia Sinquefleld, Twiggs 


Moselle Smith, 


Morgan 


Ethel Snead, 


Fayette 


Mary Emma Speer, 


Coweta 


Etna Starr, 


Newton 


Etheldra Steele, 


Meriwether 


Lucy Stevens, 


Clarke 


Ruth Stone, 


Burke 


Emma Lee Stone, 


Burke 


Aurelia Shelnutt, 


Walton 


Effie Sullivan, 


Franklin 


Rosa Swicord, 


Decatur 


Herman Stein, 


Clarke 


Gladys Skinner, 


Newton 


Jimmie Tabb, 


Early 


Mary Taylor, 


Sumter 


Grace Taylor, 


Grady 


Amanda Thompson, 


Clarke 


Mary Trowell, 


Screven 


Alma Wade, 


Crisp 


J. N. Wagner, 


Morgan 


Veazy Walker, 


Greene 


Willie Warnock, 


Emanuel 


Victoria Whatley, 


Taylor 


Blanche Whelchel, 


Dawson 


Nena Wilhite, 


Jackson 


Lucile Wilhite, 


Jackson 


Annis Wright, 


Clayton 


Wadie Wyant, 


Screven 


Lillie Wilson, 


Franklin 


Myrtie Williams, 


Habersham 


Ella Waters, 


Bulloch 


Floy Zeigler, 


Screven 


Temple Zeigler, 


Screven 



HALF-YEAR REVIEW CLASS. 



Mary W. Adams, 


Putnam 


Ruth 


Bohler, 


Lincoln 


Essie Akridge, 


Mitchell 


Lucy 


Bryan, 


Gwinnett 


Olga Avera, 


Crawford 


Luna 


Baker, 


Tift 



85 



H. A. Baker, 


Tift 


Rotha McClung, 


Marion 






Olive McLaughlin, 


Troup 


Fairah Cato, 


Crisp 






Dorothy Cantrell, 


Fulton 


Blanche Mimms, 


Decatur 


Cora Cape, 


Pickens 


Mattie Nail, 


Stewart 


Madie Cape, 


Pickens 






Rue Cockran, 


Wilkes 


Minnie Roper, 


Cherokee 


Maggie Cook, 


Gwinnett 


Cleo Reese, 


Gilmer 






Ethel Ritchie, 


Rabun 


Annie May Dickson, 


Troup 


Sam Rosser, 


Henry 


Eulah Dillard, 


Rabun 






Mary L. Dunagan, 


Hall 


May Belle Sanders, 


Greene 






Bessie May Smith, 


Tift 


Esta Garr, 


Butts 


Annette Snelson, 


Troup 


Ruth Hayes, 


Jasper 


Inez Spence, 


Mitchell 






Lyman H. Smith, 


Jackson 


Grace Johnson, 


Gordon 


Ellie Smith, 


Rockdale 


Essie Jones, 


Gwinnett 


Jamie Smith, 


Forsyth 


Carrie Kelley, 


Dodge 


Cora Young, 


Coweta 


COMMON-SCHOOL TRAINING CLASS. 




Mrs. Inez Bagwell, 


Franklin 


Grace Palmer, 


Whitfield 


Phoebe Broadrick, 


Whitfield 










Rosa Rivers, 


Jackson 


Leola Dunlap, 


Clarke 










Jewell Shivers, 


Quitman 


Inez Farris, 


Henry 


Josephine Shivers, 


Quitman 


Lessie Leard, 


Hart 


Lillian Tanner, 


Campbell 


Maude McCarter, 


Franklin 


Mattie Lou White, 


Worth 



COMMON-SCHOOL CERTIFICATE CLASS. 

Jessie Moore, Clarke Clinton Tooke, Jefferson 

Andre Roberts, Jefferson Katie Belle Wesley, Fayette 



Nelle Austin, 
Carrie Belle Arnold, 

C. T. Barnett, 



FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Coweta Rosalie Booth, 
Wilkes Annie Brinson, 



Clarke 
Tattnall 



Oconee Jennie Mae Callaway, Clarke 



Marietta Clarke, Oglethorpe 

Irene Cronic, Jackson 

Mayrelle Cronic, Jackson 

Rebecca Callaway, Wilkes 

Maude Davis, Clarke 

Annie Dougherty, Wilcox 

Willie May Edmondson, Walton 

Caroline Frankum, Franklin 



Lois Gillen, 
Myrtle Groves, 

Fannie Hall, 
Alline Holbrook, 
Ruby Holliman, 
Janie Hooten, 
Kittie Hughes, 
Frances Hunter, 

Martha Jackson, 
Alice Johnson, 
Annie Lee Johnson, 

C: B. Kelley, 
Mary Knox, 

Julia Lambert, 



Clarke 
Lincoln 

Talbot 
Franklin 
Clarke 
Henry 
Clarke 
Clarke 

Clarke 
Twiggs 
Sumter 

Jasper 
Oglethorpe 



Anna McCorkle, 


Clarke 


Fannie McCoy, 


Coweta 


Dessie McLain, 


Cobb 


Ruth McLeroy, 


Clarke 


Leona McLain, 


Fulton 


Edna McKinney, 


Clarke 


Roberta Martin, 


Madison 


Lillian C. Moore, 


Wilkes 


Josie N. Pitts, 


Colquitt 


Cleo Rainwater, 


Wilcox 



Mattie Vie Summers, Coweta 
Emilv Saunders, Chattahoochee 



Ola Tingle, 
Sabrina Trawick, 
Lillian Trawick, 
Lucile Tyson, 

Blanche Wehunt, 
Clyde Wehunt, 
Adaline Wilson, 
Jeffie Weaver, 
Inez Williams, 



Clarke Elon Young, 



Greene 

Decatur 

Decatur 

Chatham 

Madison 

Madison 

Morgan 

Walton 

Carroll 

Coweta 



DIPLOMA A CLASS. 



Eunice Aiken, 
Ruby Armstrong, 

Annie May Bass, 

Ellie May Baugh, 

Kirby Bell, 

Alva Bell, 

Myrtle Blackstock, 

Velma Bowles, 

Nannie Bowers, 

Lizzie Boynton, 

Mattie Lou Brannei 

Erne Brown, 

A. A. Browning, 



Franklin 
Pulaski 

Floyd 

Putnam 

Paulding 

Clay 

Floyd 

Meriwether 

Coweta 

Mitchell 

Putnam 

Lincoln 

Telfair 



Hattie Berry, 

Sara Claxton, 
Mellis Claxton, 
Beryl Cadwell, 
Melissa Chestnut, 
Xezzie Coile, 
Lona Lee Collier, 
Maggie Lou Collins, 
Prentiss Conoway, 
Etta Cox, 
Alice Crocker, 
Willie Chesser, 

Richard Dai ley. 



Wilkes 

Burke 

Burke 

Wilcox 

Coweta 

Oglethorpe 

Floyd 

Tattnall 

Clarke 

Cherokee 

Mitchell 

Gwinnett 

Paulding 



87 



Julia Daniel, 


Jackson 


Bessie Murphy, 


Floyd 


J. R. Dickson, 


Morgan 










Hattie R. Newton, 


Screven 


Ida Fuller, 


Richmond 


Mable Nelson, 


Bibb 


Nelle Gower, 


Banks 


Alline Odom, 


Clarke 


Kate Groves, 


Lincoln 


Minnie Olive, 


Talbot 






Olive Oliver, 


Decatur 


Lena Hamilton, 


Jackson 






Ellen Hargrove, 


Oglethorpe 


Winona Pounds, 


Crisp 




Oglethorpe 


Rebecca Payne, 


Clarke 


Julia Haslett, 


Elbert 


Janie Parsons, 


Crawford 


Dollie Hawthorne, 


Gwinnett 


Nettie Payne, 


Franklin 


Evelyn Henry, 


Floyd 


Anna Mae Penland, 


Clarke 


Bettie Herring, 


Decatur 


Ida May Peterman, 


Clarke 


Nelle Hester, 


Lincoln 


Lillie May Peterson, 


Jackson 


Irma Hicks, 


Polk 


Ruby May Porter, 


Jackson 


Mary Hilliard, 


Hart 


Ethel Pritchett, 


Pulaski 


Ruth Hodges, 


Screven 






Jessie Hogg, 


Troup 


Louise Quarterman, 


Oconee 


Ruby Holbrook, 


Franklin 


Ethelene Sands, 


Harris 


Mary Lucy Hollingsworth, 


Mattie Saye, 


Morgan 




Newton 


Bluford Sims, 


Jackson 






Bertha Smith, 


Talbot 


Fannie Isbill, 


Whitfield 


Verdah Stynchcomb, 


Oconee 


Sudie Belle Ivey, 


Newton 


Irene Snellings, 


Elbert 


Nannie Jones, 


Grady 


Cora Sutton, 


Habersham 


Nora Lee Jones, 


Colquitt 


Marie Smith, 


Greene 


Eleanor Johnson, 


Wilcox 


Lula Tribble, 


Monroe 


Mable Johnson, 


Gordon 


W. E. Taylor, 


Milton 


Jennie Kicklighter, 


Tattnall 


Bessie Tyner, 


Jones 


Margaret Kendrick, 


Chatooga 


G. C. Watkins, 


Talbot 


Nancy Elisabeth Lowry, Terrell 


Miriam Waters, 


Fulton 






Margaret Watters, 


Floyd 


Sallie McGlamry, 


Worth 


Jeanette Wallace, 


Taylor 


Jewell McDaniell, 


Taylor 


Ida Wade, 


Crisp 


Wylene McDaniell, 


Taylor 


Louise Waller, 


Hancock 


Vera Morrison, 


Pickens 


Clara West, 


Taylor 






Verah Wilcox, 


Hart 


Mary B. Manry, 


Calhoun 






Gertrude Martin, 


Clarke 


Mamie Willingham, 


Polk 


Ida Medlock, 


Gwinnett 


Nellie Wilson, 


Morgan 


Minnie Moore, 


Jackson 


Mada Wyant, 


Screven 


Hollis Morehead, 


Hart 


Dollie Wells, Montgomery 


Marie Murphy, 


Richmond 


Sarah Young 


Polk 


Nellie Murphy, 


Floyd 


Blanche Youngblood 


Marion 



88 



DIPLOMA B CLASS. 



Frances Allen, 


Rockdale 


Kathleen Knox, 


Telfair 


Bonnie Kate Barnett 
Inez Balkcom, 


Murray 
Quitman 


Ruby Kennedy, 
Allah Kidd, 


Clarke 
Webster 


Lucile Bannester, 


Richmond 


Louise McEvoy, 


Clarke 


Mittie Brackett, 


Jackson 


Annie Reid McGarity, Jackson 


Elizabeth Branch, 


Oconee 






Lillian Bryant, 


Fulton 


Eula Malcom, 


Oconee 


Jillie Brantley, 


Screven 


Rosa Mercer, 


Jones 


Emily Brown, 


Hancock 


Annie Miers, 


Sumter 


Brooksie Bowden, M 


[eriwether 


Sarah Morris, 


Fulton 


Helen Carter, 

Annie Maude Clarke, 


Cobb 
Dodge 


Ruth Meadow, 
Lillian R. Moore, 


Oglethorpe 
Jackson 


Rachel Culpepper, 




Mamie Oxford, 


Morgan 


Chattahoochee 


F. J. Osterman, 


Charlton 


Emma L. Champion, 


Crawford 


Mary Osterman, 


Charlton 


Waudie Dunn, 


Hancock 


Lizzie Powell, 


Lincoln 


Annie May Durham, 


Greene 


Rosa Lee Prater, 


Clarke 


Hortense Davant, 


Taylor 






Ruby Drinkard, 


Lincoln 


Tassie Reid, 


Haralson 






Willie Rudisill, 


Tift 


Nebraska Findley, 


Milton 






Addie Fraser, 


Liberty 


Alice Speights, 


Baldwin 






Jimmie Stokely, 


Cobb 


Annie Garland, 


Stephens 


j Holland Strother, 
Corinne Scott 


Lincoln 


Ruby Gillen, 


Clarke J" 


Cobb 


Nannie Gresham, 


Fulton 


Ruth Salmon, 


Floyd 


Lucile Gresham, 


Wilkes 


Mary Sanders, 


Floyd 


Edith Guill, 


Hancock 


Lucile Stansell, 


Rockdale 


Alma Guill, 


Hancock 










Laura Talton, 


Houston 


Dorothy Hart, 


Clarke 






Laura Home, 


Baldwin 


Jennie Usher, 


Screven 


Cora Hubbard, 


Dawson 


Floy Usher, 


Screven 


Estelle Hughes, 
Mary Holiday, 


Floyd 
Jackson 


May Vickery, 


Lincoln 


Annie Harris, 


Hart 


Kate Williams, 


Morgan 


Ella Jackson, 
Callie Jones, 
Callie F. Johnson, 


Crisp 

Dawson 

Gilmer 


Edith Wingfield, 
Tillie Woolvin, 
Mood Wright, 
Willouise Whitten 


Clarke 

Wilcox 

Richmond 

berg, Clarke 


Allene Kilgore, 


Jackson 


Winnie Ward, 


Gordon 


Wren King, 


Rabun 


Cora Ward, 


Gordon 


Lena Kingsley, 


Brooks 


Maggie Wade, 


Brooks 



Frances Beach. 



JUNIOR ELECTIVES. 

Glynn Ida Elisabeth McGukin, 



Hart 



Emmie Cliatt, 


Wilkes 


Emily Mason, 


Clarke 


Lois Cliatt, 
Lurline Collier, 


Wilkes 
Jackson 


LaVerne Nelson, 


Bibb 


Maude Crew, 


Morgan 


Lorene Owen, 


Stephens 


Eva Crovatt, 


Thomas 








Pearl Rainwater, 


Wilcox 


Ada Jane Dolan, 


Muscogee 


Dora Shaw, 


Fulton 


Lona May Harrison, 


Jackson 


Grace Spears, 


Morgan 


Thurza Harrison, 


Twiggs 


Ruth Thomas, 


Morgan 


Estelle Johnson, 


Oglethorpe 


Pearl Wallis, 


Forsyth 



DIPLOMA C CLASS. 



Ruby Anderson, Oconee 

Orien Bell Andrews, Oconee 
Louise Ash, Richmond 

Genie Maud Baldwin, Morgan 



Fannie Bird, 
Inez Brantley, 
Lillian Blair, 
O. C. Baskin, 

Sarah Callaway, 
Seleta Carter, 
Clara Clark, 
Ina Cooper, 
Essie May Clarke, 

Georgia Daniel, 
Marie Davis, 
Adalene Dobbs, 
Jane Dorough, 
Katie Downs, 



Newton 

Screven 

Douglas 

Haralson 

Putnam 

Cobb 

Floyd 

Clarke 

Clarke 

Jackson 

Rockdale 

Clarke 

Fulton 

Oconee 



Mrs. Nellie Dusenberry, 

Chatham 
Jewette Dickson, Pike 



Lizzie Edmondson 



Marion Foreman, 



Carroll 



Bertha Fulwood, 

hebecca Griffin, 
Mary Geer, 
May Gilstrap, 

Kate Harper, 
Launa Harper, 
Ludie Harris, 
Mary Hartnett, 
Winnie Harvey, 
Pauline Hilsman 
Julia Hill, 
Texas Henderson, 
Kathleen Hines, 

Charles Isbill, 

Emily Jackson, 
Lois Johnson, 
Lucile Jones, 

Alice Kelley, 
Alice Kincaid, 
Loretta La Motte, 
Eunice Lester, 



Thomas Rachel Maxwell, 



Taylor 

Spalding 
Greene 
Milton 

Wilkes 

Oconee 

Pike 

Pike 

Early 

Oconee 

Harris 

Bibb 

Harris 

Whitfield 

Oglethorpe 
Mitchell 
Mitchell 

Henry 

Spalding 

Chatham 

Bulloch 

Richmond 



90 



Bennie Mills, 



Clay 



Maude Palmer, Marianna, Fla. 
Mamie Parker, Rockdale 

Blyde Pettey, Clarke 

Elizabeth Patterson, Crisp 



Addie Speights, 
Inez Stewart, 
Susie Sutherland, 
Etna Shirley, 
Rebecca Stewart, 



Myrtie Reid, 


Haralson 


Kate Thornton 


Sue Mae Riggins, 


Pike 


Lillie Turner, 


Clara Rusk, 


Fulton 


Mary Tisinger, 



Julia Schley, Chattahoochee 
Lillian Schley, Chattahoochee 
Constance Schley, Muscogee 
Jewell Smith, Butts 

Lerah Smith, Walton 



Donnah Williford, 
Clara Williams, 
Cora Williams, 
Hannah Whatley, 
Lena Wooten, 



Baldwin 
Newton 

Spalding 
Milton 
Clarke 

Spalding 

Gwinnett 

Carroll 

Franklin 

Cobb 

Thomas 

Muscogee 

Wilkes 



Blanche Barnes, 
Claude Harrison, 



Lester Alderman, 

Buena Brantley, 
Claude V. Brown, 
Hunter Berry, 

Cary Cook, 
Wannie Carter, 
Ruth Callaway, 
Bertha Crawford, 

Irene Dunn, 
Lizzie Darnell, 

Helen Fulwood, 

Maudlynne Hitt, 
Ruth Henry, 
Estelle Hood, 
Clara Hendrick, 

Amy Jones, 



ONE-YEAR DIPLOMA. 




Cobb 


Nelle Tisinger, 


Carroll 


Hancock 






IRREGULARS. 




Bulloch 


Helen Lacy, 


Clarke 


Screven 


Ruth McWilliams, 


Crisp 


Douglas 
Terrell 


Lila Merritt, 


Green 


Newton 


Lee Norris, 


Morgan 


Laurens 


Terah Proctor, 


Buloch 


Clarke 
Franklin 


Florine Roberts, 


Jones 


Sammie Rayle, 


Elbert 


Hancock 


Annie Riley, 


Clarke 


Pickens 


Agnes Snelson, 




Houston 


Safety 


Harbor, Fla. 


Sumter 

Chattooga 

Jackson 


.May Sappington, 
Frances Sanford, 
Annie Thomas, 


Pike 
Greene 
Clarke 


Fulton 


Annie Verner, 


Gwinnett 


Dawson 


Arthur Waters, 


Bulloch 



91 



SPECIAL STUDENTS. 



Ruth Adair, 


Polk 


Eva McGee, 


Crawford 


Clara Barrow, 


Clarke 


M. W. McKee, 


DeKalb 


Eleanor Barrow, 


Clarke 


Mrs. J. B. Martin, 


Coweta 


Emoline Baker, 
Matilda Bancroft, 


Hancock 
Clarke 


Marion Nicholson, 


Clarke 


Nina Joe Barnett, 


Murray 


Kathleen O'Farrell, 


Clarke 


Addie Berry, 


Oglethorpe 






Ella Brady, 


Sumter 


Emma Pollard, 


Chatham 


Edith Branson, 


Clarke 


Grace Pittman, 


Clarke 


Alice Briggs, 


Clarke 


Mabelle Weldon Proctor, Rabun 


Bessie Bruce, 


Clarke 


Belle Park, 


Sumter 






Belle Peeler, 


Clarke 


Stark Cobb, 


Clarke 


Stella Pittman, 


Clarke 


G. R. Driggers, 


Bulloch 


Lena Quillian, 


Clarke 


Mary E. Edwards, 


Lee 


Tonnie Rampley, 


Franklin 


Fannie Greene, 


Putnam 


Mrs. Mary E. Riley, 
Dora Rushing, 


Clarke 
Bulloch 


Sarah Hunt, 


Hancock 


Janet Ryder, 


Clarke 


Kate Harrell, 
Hyram Henley, 
Cosby Hubbard, 
Roger Hill, 


Decatur 

Clarke 

Cherokee 

Clarke 


Mattie Smith, 
Sarah Stokes, 
Louise Seago, 
Leda Slaton, 


Jasper 

Clarke 

Richmond 

Taylor 


Elliece Johnson, 


Oglethorpe 


Dora Snead, 


Fayette 


Floyd Johnson, 


Sumter 


KateThaxton, 


Wilkes 


Nannie Kinnebrew, 


Clarke 


Nellie Turner, 


Gwinnett 


Mable Keith, 


Clarke 


Chestia Titshaw, 


Jackson 


Ethel Landrum, 


Franklin 


Nettie Whatley, 


Muscogee 


Lillie Belle Lowry, 


Terrell 


Nellie Williams, 


Thomas 


Elizabeth Lumsden, 


White 


Lila Wyche, 


Elbert 


CORRESPONDENCE COURSE STUDENTS, 1911 


-'12. 


Annie Austin, 


DeKalb 


Chas. Bass, 


Carroll 


Elizabeth Aycock, 


Fulton 


Kirby Bell, 


Haralson 


R. L. Boddiford, 


Taylor 


Beatrice Coram, 


Calhoun 


Nannie Bell, 


Miller 


Lena Crowley, M 


ontgomery 


L. Baldwin, 


Sumter 


B. B. Chambliss, 


Sumter 



92 



Bradie Cox, 


Madison 


R. L. Miller, 


Jackson 


Gertrude Cox, 
Ruth Chestnut, 


Madison 
Oconee 


Anna Newton, 


Pike 


W. T. Clary, 
Willie Camp, 
Claude Cowan, 
Sarah Chandler, 


Wayne 

Walton 

Newton 

Burke 


Mary Peek, 
Leila Pound, 
Maggie Parker, 
E. Patterson, 


Stewart 

Clay 

Brooks 

Bulloch 


Harriet Deason, 
E. B. Davis, 


Stewart 
Bulloch 


Jennie May Poindexter, 

Randolph 


S. C. Faust, 

Annie Ruth House, 
Isaac W. Hughes, 


Oglethorpe 

Bibb 
Jackson 


W. 0. Rowe, 
Mrs. J. P. Riddle, 
Marjorie F. Read, 


Carroll 

Washington 

Floyd 


Gladys Honem, 


Elbert 


Annie Sweet, 


Wayne 


J. F. Harper, 


Elbert 


Alice Smith, 


Troup 


Effie Harden, 


Tatnall 


Eula D. Smith, 


Colquitt 


Beulah Geeslin, 
Lena Gillespie, 
Ellie Groves, 
A. L. Geiger, 
Pearl Gower, 


Randolph 

Pike 

Oconee 

Walton 

Walton 


Mary E. Speer, 
J. P. Sorrells, 
J. W. Stephens, 
Ethel Summerour, 
Sadie M. Sears, 


Clayton 

Walton 

Madison 

Walton 

Talbot 


Emily Graham, 


DeKalb 


A. C. Tanner, 


Gwinnett 


Berry Jenkins, 


Screven 


Ruth Turner, 


Wilkes 


Callie Johnson, 


Gilmer 


Elmer Wood, 


Stewart 


R. L. Jackson, 


Morgan 


Veazy Walker, 


Greene 


Mrs. Harvey Jones, 


DeKalb 


Mrs. A. D. Williams, Madison 


Elvie Moye, 
J. F. Miller, 


Harris 
Madison 


L. P. Whelchel, 
Clara Whitehead, 


Jackson 
Gwinnett 


Edna Mobley, 


Walton 


J. H. Yeates, Jennings, La. 



VOICE PUPILS. 



Chloe Allen 

Bessie Bruce 

Clara Clark 

Marion Foreman 
Addie Frazer 
Helen Fullwood 

Bessie M. Hardy 



Launa Harper 

Ellie Jones 

Ethel Landrum 

Mamie Oxford 

Sue Mae Riggins 

Emily Stone 
Ruth Stone 



93 



PIANO STUDENTS. 



Olga Avera 

Mary Emma Adams 

Luna Baker 
Ellie Baugh 
Hunter Berry 
Fannie Bird 
Myrtle Blackstock 
Nannie Bowers 
Nina Jo Barnett 
Lillie Mae Bruce 
Velma Bowles 

Emmie Cliatt 
Malissa Chestnut 
Maggie Collins 
Fairah Cato 

Mary Dusenberry 
Kathleen Drake 
Ada Jane Dolan 
Waudie Dunn 

Nellie Everett 

Willie May Edmondson 

Addie Fraser 

Edith Guill 
Alma Guill 

Estelle Hood 
Carrie Hudgins 
Grace Hall 
Mary Hall 
Julia Hill 
Kate Harrell 
Bettie Herring 
Ruth Henry 
Jessie Hogg 
Ruth Hodges 
Marie Harrison 
Cathrine Holton 
Allene Holbrook 
Hiriam Henley 



Annie Lee Johnson 
Martha Jackson 

Mattie Lou Kemp 
Jennie Kicklighter 

Lilla Bell Lowrey 
Ethel Landrum 

Sallie McGlamry 
Olive McLaughlin 
Lily McDaniel 
Edna McKinney 
Ruth McLeroy 

Rachel Maxwell 
Vera Morrison 
Sarah Morris 
Eula Malcom 

Hattie Newton 

Blyde Pettey 
Jewell Poore 
Winona Pounds 
Ella Louise Parker 
Terah Proctor 

Tonnie Rampley 
Dora Rushing 
Jessie Redd 

Louise Seago 
Lucy K. Sappington 
Inez Stewart 
Ruth Stone 
Constance Schley 
Agnes Snelson 
Inez Spence 
Etheldra Steele 

Jimmie Tabb 
Nellie Turner' 
Lillie Turner 
Kate Thornton 

Lillian Tanner 



94 



Annie Verner 

Adeline Wilson 
Katie Bell Wesley 



Nellie Wilson 
Clara West 
Nellie Williams 



MUSCOGEE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 

Roll of Students, Session 1911-' 12. 

First Grade. 



Harvey Booth 
Frank Bradberry 
Fred Bradberry 
Jack Born 

Clarice Conaway 
Royce Conaway 
Lettie May Chasteen 

Asa Drake 

John E. Eberhart 
Lewis Earnest 

Roy Fowler 

Nina Johnson 



Frances Bostwick 
Upshaw Bostwick 

Luke Callaway 
Thomas H. Cartledge 

Joe Hall 
Mildred Hughes 

David Johnson 
Lenira Jackson 

Kenney Laurence 

Geneva McElroy 

Anna Moore 



Genevieve Lawrence 

Susan Moss 
Ruth Mygatt 

Alfred Parham 
Victor Payne 

J. B. Smith 

Helen Thomas 
Coke Talmadge 

Mark Whitehead 
Howard Waff 
Eva Whitehead 
James Waldrep 

Charles Young 



Second Grade. 

Donald Orr 

Clara Presnell 

William Ryder 

Horace Snelling 
Fain Slaughter 

Charles Talmadge 

Allen Vick< ry 

Dillard Whitehead 
Kathleen Waldrep 

James Young 



95 



Earnest Chasteen 
Bruce Carrier 
Willie Cronic 
Cora Lee Conaway 
Sam Cartledge 
Sam Lee Gaulding 

Elizabeth Harris 

Fred Iverson 

Lorna Lawrence 

Ruby Moon 



Third Grade. 

Rufus Moss 

Gertrude Parham 

Eunice Seymour 

Annie M. Whitehead 
Allen Whitehead 
J. Allen Whitehead 
Vinnie Whitehead 
Fannie May Whitworth 
Lucile Williams 

Herbert Young 



Fourth Grade. 



Elizabeth Bondurant 
Mildred Burson 

Bernice Cheely 

Carolyn Hemingway 
Opal Hughes 

Charles Johnson 

Patman Lester 

Homer McElroy 



Elma Malone 
Willie May Moore 

Charles H. Newton 

Susie Prater 
Jamie Poss 

Lucy Riley 

Annabel Rivierre 
Louise Shackleford 



Frank Burson 
Elizabeth Branson 

Lillie Conaway 
Charlie Drue Cox 
Ragan Callaway 

Mary Dusenbury 
Anna B. Drake 

Belle Hampton 
Roselle Hudson 



Fifth Grade. 

Frances Iverson 

Jessie L. Jarrell 

Beatty Kinney 

Ida Presnell 
Mozelle Payne 

Victor Ryder 

Paul Stevens 
Hattie Lee Smith 



96 



Clifton Whitehead 
Maybell Whitehead 



Erwin Whittenberg 
Louise Waldrep 



Edgar Bruce 
Garland Born 

Ruby Cronic 

Carrie Ford 
Frank Fowler 
Doyle Ford 

Mary Hall 
Laura Hall 
Lucile Head 



Sixth Grade. 

Garland Kenney 
Lurlie Moore 
Daisy McDonald 
Charlotte Newton 
Annie Payne 
Homer Stevens 
William Waldrep 



Seventh Grade. 



Edna Callaway 
Hammond Callaway 
Harlan Conaway 

Kathleen Drake 
Arnold Drake 

Annette Hamilton 
Sibyl Hampton 
Grace Hall 
Maude Hester 

Mabel Mattox 



Catherine Newton 
Walter Poss 
Cora Paine 
Catherine Paine 
Amelia Poole 
Marguerite Rivierre 
Lucy Ryder 
Moina Shackelford 
Ruth Williamson 
Willie Whitehead 
Mamie Whitehead 



Lily May Bruce 
Susan Burson 

Elberta Iverson 
George McDorman 
Doris Moore 
Virginia Newton 



Eighth Grade. 

Ruby Penland 
Marguerite Rivierre 
Clinton Stevens 
Jessie Whitehead 
Joe Whittenberg 

Annie Young 
Louis Young 



97 



GRADUATE STUDENTS. 



The following schools are this year represented by graduates 
in the student body of the State Normal School: Alabama Bre- 
nau, Brenau, Butler Male & Female College, Banks-Stephens In- 
stitute, Bowdon College, Cox College, Emanuel County Institute, 
Eleventh District Agricultural College, Georgia Normal College 
& Business Institute, Griffin District Institute, Georgia Military 
College, Hartwell Institute, Hamilton College, Johnson Institute, 
James Sprunt Institute, Locust Grove Institute, Lucy Cobb Insti- 
tute, Muscogee Elementary School, Middle Georgia Institute, Nor- 
man Park Institute, Piedmont Institute, Perry-Rainey Institute, 
Reinhardt College, Samuel Benedict Memorial, State Normal 
School, Third District Agricultural & Mechanical School, Tugaloo 
Institute, Washington Seminary; and the High Schools of Austell, 
Athens, Bronwood, Bowersville, Bluffton, Buchanan, Buford, Con- 
yers, Cary, Camilla, Columbus, Climax, Carnesville, Chattahoochee, 
Covington, Cameron, Calhoun, Dawson, Dublin, Eatonton, Ellijay, 
Elberton, Flovilla, Fairburn, Girard, Gresham, Griffin, Homans- 
ville, Hepzibah, Helena, Hartwell, Jackson County, Fla., Lumber 
city, Lavonia, Lyons, Monticello, Mansfield, Madison, Marietta, 
Maysville, Newborn, O'Neal, Pavo, Quitman, Reynolds, Rome, 
Rutledge, Roberta, Royston, Sparta, Statham, Sumter, Savannah, 
Schnectady, N. Y., Sylvania, Temple, Toccoa, Thomasville, Tifton, 
Watkinsville, Wesley, Washington, Winder, Winterville, West 
Point. 



o 



PI 



o 



n 




GRADUATES OF THE STATE NORMAL 
SCHOOL. 



Please Note. — These items of information about the graduates 
of the School are as accurate and as recent as their responses to 
our letters of inquiry have made possible. 

Many of our letters to them have remained unanswered. 

We shall be grateful to their friends, acquaintances or rela- 
tives, if they will send us postcards containing corrections of any 
mistakes, or any additional information about these graduates. 

Our graduates can well afford to keep in touch with the Presi- 
dent of the School, because he is constantly called on to locate at 
handsome salaries, graduates of this school who have had two or 
three years or more of successful experience. 



1896. 



William Robert Aldred, Emanuel Co. Teacher 15 years as prin- 
cipal in country, village, and high schools. Now teacher in 
Oconee High School, Watkinsville, Ga. 

James Miller Barnett, Baker Co. Teacher 3 V 2 years in country 
and village schools. Graduate College Physicians and Sur- 
geons, Atlanta, 1902; also from Post Graduate School and 
Hospital, N. Y. City, 1904 and 1911. Physician at Pretoria, 
Ga. Now physician and surgeon, Albany, Ga. 

Nellie Burbank, Clarke Co. Teacher in Elbert Co. 1 year and in 
Sumner Co., Tenn., 1 year. P. O. Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Ida Callaway, Clarke Co. Teacher 7 % years in country schools, 
1 year Athens City Schools. Teaching at Colbert, Ga. Home 
address, Athens, Ga. 

Keturah Floyd, Harris Co. Now Mrs. Cobb Lampkin, Athens, Ga. 
Teacher 1 year country schools. 

Annie Hammack, Early Co. Now Mrs. M. D. Carmichael, Brook- 
let, Ga. Teacher 3 years in village schools, and 3 V2 years, 
in Dothan, Ala. 



100 



Archibald Boyd Hursey, Bulloch Co. Teacher continuously in 
Stewart, Bryan, Montgomery and Appling Counties. P. O. 
Hazlehurst, Ga. Address, care of M. S. Hursey, Statesboro, 
R. F. D. No. 1. 

Louise Marie Ingraham, Fulton Co. No information. 

Jesse David Lovett, Berrien Co. Teacher 2 years in country 
schools. Since 1899 Clerk Berrien Superior Court. Now 
Ordinary Berrien County. President of the Farmers' Bank 
of Nashville, Ga. ; also farming. 

Rosa Maddox, Clarke Co. Teacher 1 year in country schools, 10 
years in Athens City Schools. P. O. Athens, Ga. 

Mamie Matthews, Oglethorpe Co. Teacher in Oglethorpe county 
five years, in Florida one year. Married in 1903. Now Mrs. 
H. C. Shad, South Jacksonville, Fla., R. F. D. No. 1. 

Kalla May Odum, Early Co. Now Mrs. C. M. Baggs, Pelham, Ga. 
Teacher 4 years Pelham High School, and 1 year Ga. South- 
ern Military College, Bainbridge. 

Joseph Pendleton O'Kelley, Hall Co. Deceased. 

Ida Quillian, Clarke Co. Teacher in country and village schools. 
Home address, Athens, Ga. 

Lois Russell, Decatur Co. Teacher 4 years in public schools, 2 
years private school. Spent 2 years studying in Chicago, 
New York and elsewhere. Teacher in Mountrie (Ga. ) Pub- 
lic Schools 2 years. Went to Japan as missionary in May, 
1906. Married in October 1906. Teaching kindergarten 
and woman's Bible class at Kochi. Address Mrs. H. H. Mun- 
roe, Kochi, Japan. 

Sarah Saffold, Morgan Co. Now Mrs. J. B. Hattaway, High 
Shoals, Ga. Teacher 3 years in Morgan Co. Schools. 

Maggie Scott, Clarke Co. Teacher 4 years in the schools of 
Clarke, Jackson and Oconee counties. P. O. Athens, Ga. 

Mrs. Elizabeth W. Smith, Hancock Co. Teacher 2 y 2 years in 
country schools and since in city schools of Dawson and 
Madison and Sparta, Ga. P. O. Sparta, Ga. 

Dr. Ida Ulmer, Lowndes Co. Teacher 7 years in Valdosta Public 
Schools. Also graduate Southern School of Osteopathy, 
Franklin, Ky. Formerly at Thomasville, Ga. Now at Dub- 
lin, Ga. 

William Emory Williams, Berrien Co. 

101 



1897. 

Jesse Lamar Barnett, Jackson Co. Deceased. 

Albert Bell, Rabun Co. Teacher 5 years Georgia common schools. 
Supt. of the Murphy (N. C.) graded schools six years. Prin. 
High School, Chipley, Ga., and at Norcross, Ga. Now at 
Sparta, Ga. 

Lollie Catherine Bell, Jackson Co. Now Mrs. Albert H. Burtz, 
Ellijay, Ga. Teacher 5 years in the common schools of Ga. 

Walter Perry Blood-worth, Monroe Co. Teacher 2 years as Prin- 
cipal, Tallapoosa High School. Now attorney at law. P. O. 
Atlanta, Ga. 

James Dowse Bradwell, Clarke Co. Attorney-at-law. P. O. 
Atlanta, Ga. 

Effie Robert Brown, Coweta Co. Teacher 4 years Atlanta Public 
Schools. Now Mrs. R. W. Moore, Sparta, Ga. 

Ossie Hytus Burrus, Franklin Co. Also graduate Peabody Nor- 
mal College, 1903. Teacher English and Latin, Madison 
(Ga. ) High School. Teacher at Adel, Ga. Now Mrs. Arthur 
Plowden, Valdosta, Ga. 

Lucie Cagle, Walton Co. Now Mrs. Clifford A. Gibbs, Monroe, 
Ga. Teacher 4 years country schools and 1 year Monroe 
City Schools. 

Young Rufus Coleman, Fayette Co. Teacher 6 years common 
schools. In service of Federal government at Forest Park, 
Ga. Graduate Atlanta School of Medicine, 1908. Now prac- 
ticing physician, Havana, Fla. 

John Henry Getzen, Bibb Co. Teacher 2 years Pendergrass High 
School, 1 year Sherman, Texas, 2 years principal Monteith 
School, Savannah. Now merchant at Pendergrass, Ga. 

Senie Griffith, Clarke Co. Teacher 1 year in Lexington, Ga. Mrs. 
\V. B. Kent, attorney-at-law, Mt. Vernon, Ga. Died 1906. 

William Andrew Jackson, Lumpkin Co. Deceased. 

Mattie Jane King, Houston Co. Now Mrs. Alexander F. Smith 
Perry, Ga. Teacher 8 years in common schools. 



102 



Miss Joseph Witt Moseley, Coweta Co. Teacher 3 years as princi- 
pal of school at Roscoe, Ga. Teacher 6 years English and 
History at Piedmont Inst. Teacher of English in Brantley 
Institute, Senoia, Ga. Teacher 4 years in public school at 
Oakland City, Atlanta. Now Mrs. W. Ferguson, Rockmart, 
Ga. 

Daniel Othello Phillips, Meriwether Co. Teacher 3 years in com- 
mon schools. Principal Odessadale (Ga.) High School four 
years. Not teaching now. Address, Greenville, Ga. 

LaFayette Capers Rawlins, Gwinnett Co. Teacher 4 years in 
country schools. Since 1901 merchant and R. R. agent at 
Almon, Ga., also postmaster. 

James Sidney Roberts, Coffee Co. Xo report. 

Robert Henry Shell, Coweta Co. Teacher 6 years in Ga. country 
schools. Principal Rose Hill City School, Dothan, Ala. Teach- 
er at Boston, Ga. Died March 25, 1911, at Thomasville, Ga. 

Clifford Tilden Whipple, Pulaski Co. Prescriptionist, Livingston's 
Pharmacy, Savannah, Ga. 

Walker White, Monroe Co. Teacher 2 years in country schools, 
1 year in Atlanta Grammar Schools, 1 year in Atlanta High 
School. Then Asst. State School Commissioner. Then Secy. 
Atlanta Y. M. C. A. Now insurance business. 

George Allen Wilder, Monroe Co. Teacher 2 years in village 
• schools. Now Business Manager Mass. Mutual Life Insur- 
ance Co., Atlanta district. P. O. Atlanta. 

William Jefferson Wynn, Putnam Co. Later first honor graduate 
Law Dept. Yale University. Teacher 4 years. Principal 
High School, Marianna, Fla. Now attorney-at-law. Birming- 
ham, Ala. Address 160 9 Bradley St., North. 

1SJ>8. 

Jessie Irene Balkcom, Early Co. Now Mrs. \V. T. Brooks, Logan- 
ville, Ga. Teacher 5 years in common schools and 1 year in 
high school. 

William Tyi annus Brooks, Gwinnett Co. Teacher ."> years in 
common schools and 1 year in high school. Now cashier 
hank at Loganville, Ga. 



103 



Jane Beatrice Bennett, Muscogee Co. Teacher iy 2 years in 
Brunswick City Schools and 6 years Columbus City Schools. 
P. O. Columbus, Ga. Married. 

Charles Graham Byington, Wilkinson Co. Teacher 5 years com- 
mon schools and Principal Bibb City Schools. Teacher in 
Columbus, Ga. ; also at Rutland and at Reynolds, Ga. Now 
farming near Macon, Ga. Address Macon, Ga., Route 2. 

Fannie Lee Brown, Coweta Co. Now Mrs. A. T. Vonderau, Hazle- 
hurst, Ga. Teacher 2 years. Principal R. L. Hope School, 
Fulton Co., 2 years in Ga. Baptist Orphanage, and since 1905 
primary teacher in Cordele City Schools. 

Annie Eloise Bowie, Fulton Co. Teacher 2 years in country 
schools and 1 year in Atlanta City Schools. P. O. 149 
Little St., Atlanta, Ga. 

James Hope Bradberry, Clarke Co. Later graduate from Univer- 
sity of Georgia. Teacher 3 years country schools. Principal 
West Point (Ga.) City Schools. Now bookkeeper, Athens, 
Ga. 

Minnie Marcella Cates, Burke Co. Teacher 3 years in Burke Co. 
schools. Stenographer in Atlanta. Address, 150 Spring St. 

Mary Eleanor Burge, Terrell Co. Now Mrs. R. H. Shell. Teacher 
3 years country and village schools and 1 year in city graded 
schools. Widow since March, 1911. Now principal of two- 
teacher school at Shiloh, Ga. 

Annie Belle Dawson, DeKalb Co. Now Mrs. R. P. Malaier, Con- 
cord, Ga. 

Frances Marion Edwards, Bibb Co. Deceased . 

Miss Tommie Eulalia Holbrook, Franklin Co. Teacher 5 years 
in Franklin Co. schools and 1 year in Tugaloo Institute. Now 
Mrs. B. T. Smith, Carnesville, Ga. 

May Jenkins, Worth Co. Teacher 5 years in Ashburn (Ga.) High 
School. Teacher of English in Candler College, Havana, 
Cuba. Now Mrs. Sam Betts, Ashburn, Ga. 

Margaret Florence Laing, Fulton Co. Teacher 2 years in village 
schools, 1 year in Dawson Public Schools. Now assistant in 
office of Associated Charities, Atlanta. Address 4 8 Angier 
Avenue. 



104 



Frances Elizabeth McConnell, Effingham Co. Now Mrs. A. R. 
Wright. Teacher 5 years in Savannah Schools. Teacher 3 
years at principal at Herod, Ga. Now at Sandersville. 

Lucy Urquhart Mitchell, Muscogee Co. Teacher 4 years in Colum- 
bus Public Schools. Now Mrs. Joseph V. Dunlap, 400 Gor- 
don St., Atlanta, Ga. 

Mattie Crosby Medlin, Oconee Co. Teacher 2 years at Good Hope, 
Ga., 3 years at High Shoals. Now at Greensboro, Ga. 

Charles John Moore, Cobb Co. Attorney-at-law, Austell Bldg., 
Atlanta. 

Bettie Mullis, Pulaski Co. No information. 

William Newton Oliver, Hall Co. Teacher at Chestnut Mountain, 
Ga. Also merchandizing. No report of total amount of 
teaching since graduation. 

Julia Starr Pinkerton, Fulton Co. Now Mrs. Chas. H. Field, 
Dalton, Ga. Teacher 1 year in country schools. 

James Marcus Patten, Berrien Co. Teacher 6 years in country 
schools. 1 year principal West Institute, Valdosta. Now en- 
gaged in naval stores business. Adel, Ga. 

Emma Leila Sims, Clarke Co. Now Mrs. Rufus R. Burger, Wat- 
kinsville, Ga. Teacher 2 years in State Normal School, Prac- 
tice School, and 3 years in country schools. 

Merle Marie Stephens, Fulton Co. Teacher 3 years in graded city 
schools. 1 year as a student and 2 years assistant Manual 
Training Department, Atlanta City Schools. Address 101 
E Linden St., Atlanta. 

Russell Franklin Terrell, Franklin Co. Teacher 3 years Franklin 
Co. schools. Graduate from Peabody College, Nashville, 
Tenn., in 1904. Teacher in High School, Ocala, Fla. Now in 
Perry, Fla. 

May Towns, Clarke Co. Now Mrs. J. E. Randolph, Jr., Jefferson, 
Ga. Teacher 2 years in country schools and 3 years in Mar- 
tin Institute. 

Mamie Catherine Webb, Jackson Co. Now Mrs. O. R. Ledford, 
Decatur, Ga. Teacher country and village schools. 

Nellie Wagnon, Clarke Co. Teacher 3 years in country and vil- 
lage schools. Now a trained nurse. Athens, Ga. 



105 



William Donnan Wells, Marion Co. Teacher 3 years in village 
schools. Principal Adel Institute, Adel, Ga., 4 years. Farm- 
ing since 1905. Address, Adel, Ga. 

Minnie Wright, Meriwether Co. Married to L. C. Rawlins, Al- 
mon, Ga., Jan. 1902. Died April, 1903. 

1899. 

Errett Allen, Walker Co. Later graduate from Peabody College, 
Nashville, Tenn. Teacher 2 years in country schools. Since 
1904 principal Lindale School, Lindale, Ga. Now in Louis- 
iana. 

Mary Albert Allen, Pulton Co. Now Mrs. W. T. Hamilton, Hape- 
ville, Ga. Teacher 2 years country schools. 

Sarah Elizabeth Baldwin, Randolph Co. Now Mrs. Theo. J. 
Perry, Cuthbert, Ga. Teacher in Cuthbert three years. Now 
teaching a private school. 

Mary Emma Barwick, Clarke Co. Teacher 2 years in country 
schools. Since 1901, teacher Athens City Schools. 

Rosa L. Bean, Coweta Co. Now Mrs. C. C. Nail, Hogansville, Ga. 
Teacher 6 years in country and village schools. 

Alma Maud Bullard, Baldwin Co. Teacher 4 years. Now Mrs. 
E. L. Moseley. Teaching at Barnesville, Ga. 

Zettie Kiah Chauncey, Pierce Co. Now Mrs. W. D. Wells, Adel, 
Ga. Teacher 1 year in Pierce Co. High School, 1 year Mc- 
Donough Institute, 1 year Adel Institute, and 2 years as 
principal Screven School. 

Mattie May Cochran, DeKalb Co. Married Mr. Will Jacobs, Tuck- 
er, Ga., in 1902. Husband died two weeks later. Teacher 2 
years in country schools and 3 years in graded schools. 

Lily Chappell Collins, Mitchell Co. Now Mrs. J. P. Sharp, Bacon- 
ton, Ga. Teacher 1 year country schools and 3 V 2 years vil- 
lage schools. Took post-graduate course S. N. S. 1908-'09. 

Dorothy Lee Crim, Pulton Co. Teacher 1 year Fulton Co. Schools. 
3 years Atlanta schools. Later student in Scarrett Bible and 
Training School preparing to be a foreign missionary. Ad- 
dress 745 Boulevard, Atlanta, Ga. 



106 



Eula Hill Culpepper, Mitchell Co. Teacher 6 terms in country 
schools. New 3 room building erected for her near Dublin. 
P. O. Albany, Ga. 

Florence May Dunn, Sumter Co. Teacher 2 years Buena Vista 
schools, 2 years country schools. Teacher of drawing, Amer- 
icus schools. Now Mrs. G. W. Walters, Americus, Ga. 

Jessie L. Edmondson, Greene Co. Now Mrs. R. C. Bacheller, 
Kingston, Ga. Teacher 2 years in country and village schools. 

Nettie Grace Freeman, Talbot Co. Teacher 6 years in country 
and village schools. P. O. Burwell, Ga. Now teaching in 
Atlanta. 

Sarah Nellie Getzen, Bibb Co. Teacher in Columbus Public 
Schools since 1900. Address 1016 Third Avenue. 

Julia Anna Gibson, Thomas Co. Teacher in country and village 
schools of DeKalb, Colquitt, Thomas and Brooks counties 
since graduation. Address, Pavo, Ga. 

Alice Louisa Greene, Dougherty Co. Now Mrs. J. L. Arnold, 
Athens, Ga. Teacher 1 y 2 years Athens City Schools. 

Mary Frazer Hale, Oconee Co. Teacher 2 years in village schools 
and 4 years city graded schools. Teacher in Fitzgerald (Ga. ) 
Public Schools. Now teaching at Fort Valley. 

Harriet Pearl Heard, Greene Co. Teacher, 2 years in village 
school, 1 year in Etowah Institute, Canton, Ga. Taught in 
Wilkes Co. Home P. O. Washington, Ga. Now teaching at 
Brinson, Ga. 

Elizabeth Grace Holt, Richmond Co. Teacher 3 years in Athens 
City Schools and 4 years in Augusta City Schools. Director 
Manual Training in Mill School Home. Address Green St., 
Augusta. 

Carrie Bell Hyde, Early Co. Later graduated Oread Institute, 
Worcester, Mass. Teacher 2 years Athens City Schools, 1 
year principal Danielsville Model School, 1 V 2 years Bruns- 
wick City Schools and Director of Domestic Science there. 
Teacher Domestic Science at Brenau College, Gainesville, Ga. 
Now teaching Domestic Science, Girls' Normal and Industrial 
School, Rock Hill, S. C. 

Karl Marie Kaufman, Telfair Co. Now Mrs. S. F. Powell. Bain- 
bridge, (la. Teacher '1 years in country schools. 



107 



Clara Bell Ledbetter, Dooly Co. Teacher 3 years Cordele Schools, 
2 years teacher English and History, Woodlawn (Ala.) High 
School. Now teaching English at Laurel (Miss.) High 
School. 

Ha Earl Merritt, Greene Co. Married Mr. R. L. McCommons, 
Greensboro, Ga., in 1902. Teacher 2y 2 years in country 
schools. 

Mary Leila Moore, Greene Co. Now Mrs. Paul Smith, Athens, 
Ga. Teacher 2 y 2 years at Union Point. 

Phebe Moore, Greene Co. Now Mrs. C. A. Hardy, Washington, 
Ga. Teacher 5 years. 

Frank Pleasance, Wayne Co. Teacher in Bulloch and Walton 
counties. Now in business at Buford, Ga. 

Linton Stephens Reeves, Meriwether Co. P. O. Greenville, Ga. 
No report. 

Willie May Stephens, Fulton Co. Teacher 4 years in Fulton Co. 
schools. Address, 101 E. Linden Ave., Atlanta, Ga. 

Alberta Vason, Laurens Co. Teacher 7 years in country schools 
and 1 year in Dublin Public Schools. Now Mrs. B. F. Coch- 
ran, Dublin, Ga., R. F. D. No. 3. 

Harriet Elizabeth Villard, Fulton Co. Now Mrs. Henry Bush, 
Roswell, Ga. No report about teaching. 

George Emory West, Mitchell Co. Teacher 3 years in country 
and village schools. Now merchant and farmer at Camilla, 
Ga. 

1900. 

Mary Emily Bailey, Mitchell Co. Teacher 6 years in country and 
village schools. Now Mrs. E. P. Lake, Wrightsville, Ga. 

May Barrett, Clarke Co. Teacher 3 years in Tennille Institute. 
Teacher in Florence, S. C, Public Schools. Now teaching in 
Kentucky State Normal School. Home address, Athens, Ga. 

Daisy Elizabeth Bayard, Muscogee Co. No information about 
teaching. P. O. Girard, Ala. 



108 



Robert Benjamin Brewton, Tattnall Co. Also a B.S. graduate 
from Peabody Teachers' College in 1904. Teacher 2 years in 
village schools, 1 year Principal Swainsboro Public Schools, 
1 year principal schools at Donaldsonville, Ga., 1 year prin- 
cipal schools at Alma, Ga., 2 years principal school at Hazle- 
hurst, Ga. Principal school at Millen, Ga., 2 years. Now- 
principal school at Xorcross, Ga. 

Elizabeth Edna Britt, Crawford Co. Now Mrs. D. D. Dawling, 
Clear Water, Fla. No report about teaching. 

John Franklin Carswell, Richmond Co. Teacher 3 years in coun- 
try and village schools and 1 year in graded city schools. 
Principal school at Avera, Ga., since 1907. 

Annie Jane Curry, Decatur Co. Teacher 5 years in village schools. 
Now teacher in Brunswick City Schools. 

Lillie May Dodgen, Bartow Co. Teacher 2 years in Toccoa Pub- 
lic Schools, 1 year Jackson High School, 1 year at Cassville. 
Later student University Chicago. P. O. Cassville, Ga. 

William Dolby Greene, Taylor Co. Later graduated from the 
Peabody Teachers' College. Teacher in Washington and El- 
berton City Schools. Principal of school at Jesup, Ga., two 
years. Superintendent school at McDonough, Ga., since 1907. 

Marcella Griffith, Clarke Co. Teacher 2 years Columbus City 
Schools. Now teacher Macon City Schools. 

Edward Digby Gunby, McDuffie Co. Teacher 1 term in village 
schools. Since 1901 principal Warrenton (Ga.) High School. 
Now at McDonough. 

James Persons Hogge, Marion Co. Teacher 3 years in village 
schools. Now farmer and dealer in cotton, fertilizers, etc. 
P. O. Buena Vista, Ga. 

Ella Mary McDaniel, Mitchell Co. Now Mrs. George P. Jackson, 
Baconton, Ga. Teacher 2 years in country and 2 years in 
village schools. Now teaching- at Baconton. 

Mary Belladonna Maugham, Worth Co. Teacher 2 years Norman 
Park Institute, Norman Park, Ga. (formerly Obe). Teacher in 
McPhaul Institute, Sylvester, Ga., 5 years. Teacher I year 
in Valdosta Public School. Now teaching at Sylvester again. 



109 



Mrs. Lillie May Martin, Randolph Co. Teacher 1 year Rochelle 
Public Schools, 3 years Conyers Public Schools, and 1 year 
in Cuthbert Public Schools. Died April 2, 1908. 

Lillian Middlemas, Spalding Co. P. O. Chipley. Teacher in 
Athens City Schools. 

Corrie Minis, Appling Co. Teacher 3 years in country schools. 
Not teaching at present. P. O. Elliott, Ga. 

Lucie Frances Nagle, Fulton Co. Teacher 3 years in rural schools, 
1 years in Jackson Institute, Ga., and 2 years in Mrs. Cher- 
ry's School, Atlanta, Ga. 

Luna Belle Schelley, Thomas Co. Teacher 10 years in country 
schools. P. O. Pavo, Ga. 

Mary Vallie Shelley, Thomas Co. Teacher 10 years in country 
schools. P. O. Pavo, Ga. 

Florence Newton Sanders, Hart Co. Later was graduated from 
Peabody Teachers' College. Teacher 5 terms in country 
schools, 1 year in Pendleton, S. C, school. Now teacher in 
the Y. W. C. A. College, Toluca, Mex. 

Nancy Lazina Thomas, Appling Co. Now Mrs. Algernon C. Col- 
son, 60 7 Colton St., Tampa, Fla. Teacher 1 year Memorial 
School and 1 year Peyton School. 

Gertrude Taylor, Randolph Co. Now Mrs. Max E. Land, Rochelle, 
Ga. Teacher 2 years Rochelle Public Schools and 1 year 
Conyers Public School. 

Mary Eliza Torrance, Baldwin Co. Teacher 6 years in country 
schools. P. O. Dexter, Ga., R. F. D. No. 4. 

Maude Elizabeth Walker, Screven Co. Teacer 6 years Screven 
county schools. Now Mrs. Dutton, Cameron, Ga. 

1901. 

Wilhelmina Dorsey Buesse, Early Co. Now Mrs. John Wyatt 
Bonner, Gray, Ga. Teacher 3 years as Principal Colomokee 
Schools and 1 year at Donaldsonville. 

Susanna Elizabeth Blitch, Ware Co. Teacher 1 year at Sparks, 
Ga., and 5 years at Corinth, .Miss., as principal Grammar 
School Department. Now Mrs. Geo. Marble, 720 Twelfth 
Ave., Pensacola, Fla. Supply teacher 2 years in the Pensa- 
cola City Schools. 



110 



Emma Broach, Walton Co. Teacher 3 years in village schools of 
Georgia. Assistant Principal Iron City School, Iron City, 
Ga., 6 years. Since April, 1910, in Census Department, 
Washington, D. C. 

Berta Callaway, Greene Co. Now Mrs. T. E. Brown, Bremen, Ga. 
Teacher 2 years at Dovedale, Ga., and 1 year in Tallapoosa 

Public Schools. 

Ben Hill Cocroft, Morgan Co. Teacher 2 years as Principal Floyd 
County Model School. Student in Mercer University. Now 
in business at Thomasville, Ga. 

Eula Ella Dunahoo, Jackson Co. Teacher 3 years in Jackson 
county schools, 1 year in Gillsville High School, and 1 year 
in Buford High School. Now Mrs. S. R. Venable, Colorado, 
Texas. 

Mamie Davis, Clarke Co. Teacher 2 years in country schools. 
Now a bookkeeper, Athens, Ga. 

Matie B. Eppes, Clarke Co. Teacher 2 years in private school in 
Georgia and 1 year in Florida. Not teaching now. Address, 
Clarkesville, Ga. 

Sallie Fannie Evans, Muscogee Co. Teacher 5 years Columbus 
Public Schools. Address 1225 Fifth Avenue, Columbus, Ga. 

Lillian Gaither Griffith, Muscogee Co. Teachar Columbus Public 
schools since 1902. Student one year Peabody College for 
Teachers, and four summers Columbia University. 1910-'ll 
Assistant in English, Columbus High School. Now teacher 
Modern Languages, Columbus High School. Address, 1028 
Third Ave., Columbus, Ga. 

Mary Ellen Herring, Decatur Co. Teacher 4 terms Georgia coun- 
try schools. Teacher in Mary Keener Institute, City of 
Mexico. Teacher at Calvary, Ga. Now Mrs. G. B. Carter, 
Faceville, Ga. 

Mary Lou Hopge, Macon Co. Now Mrs. Velpo Akridge, Harts- 
field, Ga. Teacher 4 years in country schools. Died L909. 

Sarah Jolley, Quitman Co. Teacher I years in Quitman, Ran- 
dolph, Colquitt, Worth and Hart Counties. Teacher ai La- 
vonia. Now teaching at Bremen, Ga. Home P. O, .Morris 
Station. 



Ill 



Mary Dorothy Lyndon, Clarke Co. Teacher in S. N. S. Practice 
School as supply teacher in 1902. Teacher in Banks Stephens 
Institute, Forsyth, Ga., in 1903. Holds certificate from the 
Stanhope-Wheatley Dramatic School, N. Y. City. Took lec- 
tures in Columbia University, 190 5. Society editor of The 
Athens Banner. Now teaching history at the Lucy Cobb In- 
stitute, Athens, Ga. 

Jonas Granberry Oliver, Dooly Co. Teacher 5 years in country 
and village schools. Now traveling salesman. P. O. Macon, 
Ga. 

Martha Pfohl, Muscogee Co. Teacher 1 year in country schools. 
Since 1902 teacher in Columbus City Schools. Address 651 
Twentieth Street. 

D. H. Purvis, Warren Co. Teacher 6 years in country schools. 
P. O. Barney, Ga. 

Sallie Queen Shelnutt, Walton Co. Teacher 3 years in village 
schools. Teacher at Walnut Grove, Ga. P. O. Loganville, 
Ga. Now at Watkinsville, Ga. 

Bertha Inez Sheppard, Johnson Co. Teacher in South Georgia 
schools since graduation. Student of Boston School of Ex- 
pression, and in summer schools at Columbia University, 
Knoxville and Monteagle, Tenn. Now teacher of English and 
Expression in Second District Agricultural School at Tifton, 
Ga. 

Bessie Stanley, Hancock Co. Now Mrs. S. W. Wood, Sandersville, 
Ga. Teacher at Center in 1902 and in Tennille Institute in 
1902-03. Teacher of history and geography in Sandersville 
High School 4 years. Post-graduate student State Normal 
School 1910-'ll. Now teaching Domestic Science and Man- 
ual Arts in the Ashburn Public School, Ashburn, Ga. 

I. Matt Thompson, Walton Co. Teacher 6 years country schools. 
Now farming. P. O. Monroe, Ga., R. F. D. 2. 

Maggie Young, Richmond Co. Now Mrs. J. J. Bazemore. Teach- 
er 3 years country schools and in Augusta Orphans' Home. 

1902. 

Charles Hyman Calhoun, Montgomery Co Teacher 1 term in 
country school, 1 year in charge Grammar School Depart- 
ment, Boston Public Schools, 2 years in Vienna Public 



112 



Schools, 1 year teacher English and History in Washington 
(Ga.) High School. Now practicing attorney at Washington, 
Ga., and County Superintendent of Schools-elect, Wilkes 
County. 

Jane Ellen Claxton, Burke Co. Teacher 5 years in Burke Co. 
schools. Graduated from Draughon's Business College. Now 
an accountant in Atlanta, Ga. Address New Kimball Hotel. 

Dovie Elizabeth Forrester, Dade Co. Died soon after graduation. 

Ada Jane Haddock, Clarke Co. Teacher 4 years in country 
schools. P. O. Athens, Ga. 

Pattie Hillsman, Clarke Co. Teacher 3 terms in country schools. 
Teacher in public schools, Athens, Ga. Teacher Latin in 
High School, Athens, Ga. Now studying at University of 
Chicago. 

Margaret Holman, Clarke Co. Teacher 6 months in country 
schools. Now Mrs. M. A. Jenkens. 

Lilly May Hursey. Bulloch Co. Teacher 1 year in Hazlehurst 
High School and 3 terms in country schools. P. O. Black, Ga. 

Worthy Loyola Johnson, Madison Co. Teacher 1 term in country 
school, 2 years in Rochelle, Ga., and 2 years in Fitzgerald 
Public Schools. B.S. graduate of Teachers' College, Colum- 
bia University, June 1910. Teacher Manual Arts, Virginia 
State Normal School, Farmville, Va., 3 years. Teacher Do- 
mestic Science and Art, Bessie Tift College, Forsyth, Ga., 1 
year. Now teaching Drawing, Manual Training, and Domes- 
tic Science in Normal School, Springfield, South Dakota. 

Nell Anna Ketchum, Clarke Co. Since 1903 teacher in Savannah 
Public Schools. Address 122 Walburg St. W., Savannah, Ga. 

Nannaline Myrick, Baldwin Co. Teacher 1 year in Temple school, 
Ga., and 1 term at Dovedale, Ga. Died 1909. 

Lollie Moore Smith, Greene Co. Teacher 2 years in S. N. S. Prac- 
tice School, and Principal of the same .") years. Now Critic 
Teacher, School of Education-, University of Chicago. 

Matthew Whitfield Spearman, Jasper Co. Teacher 4 years in 
country and village schools. Graduate Atlanta School of 
Medicine, 1911. Now physician at Grady Hospital. Atlanta, 
Ga. Home address, Shady Dale, Ga. 



113 



Charlotte Jessye Swope, Muscogee Co. Teacher 1 term in country 
school. Teacher seven years in Columbus Public Schools. 
Now Mrs. Ben F. Winston, Valdes Hotel, Valdosta, Ga. 

Willie Whitfield Turner, Newton Co. Teacher in Monticello (Ga.) 
Public Schools 9 years. Now teaching in Moultrie (Ga.) 
Public Schools. 

Sallie Belle Williams, Muscogee Co. Later a student Good Samar- 
itan Hospital, Lexington, Ky. For 2 years teacher in Brenau 
College. 

1903. 

Maud Barrett, Wilkes Co. Now Mrs. R. B. Wiley, Sparta, Ga. 
Teacher 2 years in country and village schools. 

Mrs. Lilla J. Clarke, Mitchell Co. Teacher Manual Training and 
Domestic Science 3 years in the Mass.-Ga. Model School at 
Cass Station, 2 years at the Vashti Industrial School and 
Home, Thomasville, Ga. ; One year at Meridian Woman's 
College, Meridian, Miss. Not teaching now. Address, 509 
E. 44thSt., Chicago. 

Mary Ethel Creswell, Walton Co. Teacher 9 years in S. N. S. 
Elementary School, 1 year as principal. Now in charge of 
Girls' Club Work, State College of Agriculture Extension 
Work. 

Emma Leila Callaway, Troup Co. Now Mrs. Millard Reese, 
Brunswick, Ga. Teacher 3 years in Brunswick Public Schools. 

Tommie Dozier, Fulton Co. Now Mrs. Evans Hall, Cartersville, 
Ga. Teacher 2 years in the Model School at Cass Station, Ga. 

Annie Jarrell, Jones Co. Teacher 1 year in country schools. 
Principal Union High School, Macon, Ga., R. F. D. 2. Mar- 
ried and living in Macon. 

Orline Myrtle Miller, Fulton Co. Teacher 1 year as principal in 
Rock Spring School, Fulton Co. History teacher in West 
Point (Miss.) High School 2 years. Now Mrs. J. L. Green- 
well, 1419 Queen Anne Ave., Seattle, Wash. 

Lula Helen Moore, Greene Co. Now Mrs. Groves Colbert, Rut- 
ledge, Ga. Teacher 1 year in country schools. Since 1904, 
1st assistant, Rutledge High School. 



114 



Ella Sands, Harris Co. Teacher 1 year in country schools. Teach- 
er 3 years in Lanett (Ala.) Public Schools. 1909-'10 took 
commercial course at A. G. I. S., Montevallo, Ala. 1910 
Commercial course at Draughon's Business College, Atlanta. 
Now teaching country school near LaGrange. Home address, 
Five Points, Ala. 

Lucile Stephens, Fulton Co. Teacher 1 year in Fulton County 
school. Later graduated from Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. 
Y. Now teacher Domestic Science in Industrial School, 
Columbus, Ga. 

Angela David Williams, Bulloch Co. Teacher 1 year Normal In- 
stitute, Obe, Ga., and 2 years in Zion Public Schools. P. O. 
Marlow, Ga. 

Ina Josephine Williams, Muscogee Co. Teacher since 1904 in 
Columbus (Ga.) Public Schools. 

1904 

Sallie Josephine Bennett, Morgan Co. Teacher in country and 
village schools 6 years. Now Mrs. Duncan Bickley, Meigs, 
Ga. 

Leila Narcissa Binns, Harris Co. Now Mrs. S. M. Davis, Fortson, 
R. F. D. No. 1. Teacher 1 year at Hapeville, Ga. 

L. Ella Bussey, Fulton Co. Teacher 2 years in Fulton County 
Schools. Address 272 Ashby St., Atlanta, Ga. 

Fannie Ruth Carpenter, Elbert Co. Teacher since graduation in 
Griffin (Ga.) Public Schools. 

Thomas Janes Carswell, Richmond Co. Teacher 3 years at Nich- 
olls, Ga. Graduate Peabody Teachers' College, Nashvile, 
Tenn., 1905. Received the degrees of M.D. and Ph.G. from 
the University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn., 1908. Resident 
physician of New York Infant Asylum, 161 West 61st St., 
New York City, 1909-'10. Now practicing medicine and 
surgery at Waycross, Ga. Secretary of the Medical Board of 
the Kings' Daughters' Hospital, Waycross, and also Secreta- 
ry-Treasurer of the Ware County Medical Society. Took 
post-graduate course on eye, ear, nose and throat at the Chi- 
cago Policlinic and Hospital in 1911. 

Ellie Glover Cheshire, Fulton Co. Teacher 5 years in Fulton 
County schools. Now married and living in Washington 
State. 



115 



Nernie Gordy, Muscogee Co. Teacher 5 years in Columbus City 
Schools. Xo^.' Mrs. J. L. Peacock, nose Hill, Columbus, Ga. 

Vannie Clifford Hunt, Pike Co. Now Mrs. P. W. Moore, Ashland, 
Ala. Teacher 1 year in Temple (Ga.) Model School, 1 year 
in Gordon Institute, Barnesville, Ga. 

Harriet Louise Peary, Fulton Co. Teacher since graduation in 
Atlanta Public Schools. 

Jane Elizabeth Reynolds, Baldwin Co. Teacher 1 term in Han- 
cock County schools and 1 term in Forsyth Institute, 2 years- 
at Commerce, Ga. Home P. O. Milledgeville, Ga. Now 
teaching at Dublin, Ga. 

Annie Cloud Thrasher, Oconee Co. Teacher 2 years in Brunswick 
Public Schools. Teacher at Watkinsville, Ga., 2 years. 
Teacher in Oconee County school two years. Now teacher 
in Atlanta, Ga., Public Schools. 

Lilla Tuck, Clarke Co. Has not taught since graduation. P. O. 
Athens, Ga. 

1905. 

Chloe Ellen Allen, Hancock Co. English-Latin Diploma. Teacher 

1 year in country schools. Assistant Department Elementary 
Science, S. N. S., since 1906. 

Julia Irene Ash, Clarke Co. English Diploma. Teacher 4 years 
at Monticello; 1 year at Hawkinsville, Ga. Now teaching at 
Winder, Ga. Home address, Athens, Ga. 

Nobie Theodosia Beall, Winkinson Co. English-Latin Diploma. 
Teacher 3 years in country and village schools. Governess 
at Cochran, Ga. Student at Woman's Missionary Union 
Training School, Louisville, Ky., 1911-'12. Home address, 
Jeffersonville, Ga., R. F. D. No. 3. 

Lena M. Bird, Clarke Co. Elective Diploma. Teacher at San- 
dersville, Ga., and at Quitman, Ga. Now teacher Athens City 
Schools. Home address, Athens, Ga. 

Louise Bryan, Greene Co. English Diploma. Teacher 1 year 
country school, 1 year Elberton, Ga. Now Mrs. B. Wofford 
Waits, Conway, S. C. 

Ida Elizabeth Bruce, Wilcox Co. English-Latin Diploma. Teacher 

2 years Tattnall Institute, Claxton, Ga., 1 year in the O'Neal 
High School, Cordele, Ga. Now Mrs. O. R. DeLoach, Claxton, 
Ga. 

116 



Xiillie Cone, Muscogee Co. English-Special Manual Arts Diploma. 
2 years Columbus City Schools. Home address, 12 34 Fourth 
Avenue. Teacher at Carrollton, Ga., 1910-'ll. 

Annie Elizabeth Cook, Baldwin Co. English Diploma. Teacher 
4 years S. X. S. Practice School, Athens, Ga., 2 years in Val- 
dosta, Ga. Now critic teacher School of Education, Univer- 
sity of Chicago. 

Mary Adeline Copeland, Greene Co. English-Special Manual Arts 
Diploma. Teacher 2 years Greensboro, Ga. Address, Greens- 
boro, Ga. 

George Vivian Cunningham, Lowndes Co. English-Latin-Greek 
Diploma. Teacher 2 years Hahira, Ga. Now teaching in 
District Agricultural School, Americus, Ga. 

Annie DeVore, Milton Co. English-Latin Diploma. Teacher at 
Alpharetta, Ga. Now Mrs. Will Rogers, Doraville, Ga., R. 
F. D. No. 1. 

Fannie Erwin Dorsey, Clarke Co. English Diploma. Teacher 1 
year East Athens Night School. Teacher Athens City 
Schools. Now Mrs. Parks Hosey, Atlanta, Ga. 

Tallulah Ellen Edwards, Laurens Co. Now Mrs. John Arrendale, 
Clayton, Ga. English-Special Manual Arts. Teacher 1 year 
Rabun Gap, 2 years in village schools. 

Annie Everett, Washington Co. English Diploma. Teacher 4 
years in Washington and Fulton County Public Schools. 
Now teaching in Stanley, New Jersey. Home address, Ten- 
nille, Ga. 

Johanna Friesleben, Troup Co. English-Latin Diploma. Teacher 
1 year in Troup Co., 1 year in Shawmut. Ala. Teacher in 
Birmingham City Schools since 1909. Home address, West 
Point, Ga. 

Lizzie Sophronia Dyer, Randolph Co. English Diploma. Teacher 
1 year in country schools. Deceased. 

Fannie Coline Gibbs, Morgan Co. English-French Diploma. 
Teacher 1 year Apalachee, Ga. Now teaching in Madison 
Public Schools. Home address, Madison, Ga. 

Mary Glenn, DeKalb Co. English-Latin Diploma. Now teacher 
in Jackson, Ga. Teacher 1 year in Edgewood, Ga. 



117 



Carolyn Lucile Greene, Troup Co. English-Latin Diploma. 
Teacher 1 year in Georgia Baptist College, Morganton, Ga. 
Teacher 4 years in Griffin, Ga., Public Schools. Now Mrs. 
W. J. Baldwin, 1037 Fifth Ave., Columbus, Ga. 

Leila May Haddock, Clarke Co. English-Latin Diploma. Teacher 
since graduation in country and village schools. Home ad- 
dress, Athens, Ga. 

Ruby Magdalene Harbin, Clarke Co. Elective Diploma. Teacher 
1 year Kindergarten, Athens. Teacher 1 year in Nashville, 
Ga. Now teaching in Athens City Schools. Home address, 
Athens, Ga. 

Lillian Rebecca Harkness, Butts Co. English Diploma. Teacher 
3 years in Pelham, Ga., 2 years Dawson, Ga. Now teacher 
at Cordele, Ga. Home address, Jackson, Ga. 

Sara Martha Harley, Thomas Co. English Diploma. Teacher 2 
years in Thomasville Public Schools. 

Alice Harris, Houston Co. English Diploma. Teacher 2 years in 
country schools, 1 year at Demorest, Ga., 1 year at Lake 
Park, Ga., and 1 year at Ashburn, Ga. Now Mrs. J. L. Bass, 
Ashburn, Ga. 

Alice May Harvard, Laurens Co. Elective Diploma. Teacher 1 
year Iron City, Ga. Now married. 

Marion Olive Herndon, Oglethorpe Co. English-Latin Diploma. 
Teacher 2 years, Douglas, Ga., 1 year Athens City Schools, 
1 year Crawford High School, now teaching in Lee Street 
School, Atlanta. Home address, Crawford, Ga. 

Mrs. Marie Alice Hollinshed, Fulton Co. English Diploma. Home 
address, Atlanta, Ga., 42 Auburn Avenue. Teacher 1 year 
at Salem School, Troup Co., 4 years principal Pleasant Grove 
School, Troup County, 1 year in Washington state. 

Cora Fannie Houze, Milton Co. English Diploma. Teacher 2 
years at Dallas, Ga. Now Mrs. F. E. D. Morgan, 295 Nellie 
B. Ave., Athens, Ga. Princeton. 

Estelle Caroline Hyer, Newton Co. Elective Diploma. Teacher 
1 year Banks-Stephens Institute, Forsyth, Ga. ; 1 year Con- 
yers, Ga., Public Schools, 1 year Public Schools, Apapka, 
Fla. Now principal school at Ococe, Fla. 



118 



Anna Kate Johnson, Richmond Co. Elective Diploma. Teacher 
1 year Vaucluse, S. C. Teacher 2 years Monticello, Ga., Pub- 
lic Schools. Teacher 1 year Valdosta High School. One year 
substituted in Richmond County Public Schools and took 
training in primary methods to qualify for position in the 
Augusta schools. Teacher 1 year, Augusta, Ga. Home ad- 
dress, Augusta, Ga., Route 2. 

Helen Love Johnson, Fulton Co. English-Latin Diploma. Teach- 
er 3 years Social Circle, Ga., 3 years College Park, Ga. Now 
principal of Clayton Public School, Fulton Co. Home ad- 
dress, College Park, Ga. 

Lula Yv^ren Jones, Coweta Co. Now Mrs. Jos. M. Brown, Frank- 
lin, Ga. Teacher 1 V2 years, Culloden, Ga., 1 year Liberty 
School, Franklin, Ga. 

Elizabeth Mell Kelly, Clarke Co. English-Latin Diploma. Teach- 
er 1 year at Bogart, Ga. Teacher 1 year Tuckston, Ga. Now 
teacher in Athens City Schools. Address, Athens, Ga. 

Annie Theodora Kidwell, Chatham Co. Elective Diploma. Teach- 
er Mt. Airy a short time. Teacher 4 years at Thomasville, 
Ga. Since 190 9 teacher in Savannah City Schools. Address 
613 Barnard St., Savannah, Ga. 

Missouri Edrington Leake, Fulton Co. English-French Diploma. 
Teacher Atlanta City Schools since graduation. Address, 9 4 
Crew St., Atlanta, Ga. 

Rebecca Ann Lingo, Marion Co. Married Mr. G. V. Cunningham, 
Americus, Ga. Teacher 1 year at Hahira, Ga. Died 1911. 

Mary Valinda Lively, Burke Co. English-Special Manual Arts 
Diploma. Teacher 3 years country schools, at Sardis, GirarcJ, 
and Bascom, Ga. Now Mrs. Robt. Lovett, Waynesboro, Ga. 

ChlOe Loyd, Newton Co. English-Latin-French Diploma. Assist- 
tant English Department State Normal School, Athens, Ga., 
since graduation. 

Claude Alberta Martin, Floyd Co. English-Latin-French Diploma. 
Teacher 2 years Poplar Springs Industrial School near Dub- 
lin, Ga. Now teaching Domestic Science, History, and Geog- 
raphy in District Agricultural School, Powder Springs, Ga. 

Annie Belle Melton, Greene Co. English-Latin Diploma. Teacher 
4 years country schools. Now Mrs. Frank McDowell, Monti- 
cello. Ga. 



119 



Nelle Colquitt Michael, Walton Co. English-Special Manual Artts 
Diploma. Teacher in Athens City Schools since graduation. 

Ethel Gertrude Moseley, Early Co. English Diploma. Teacher 1 
year Donaldsonville High School. Superintendent Primary 
Department Pavo High School for 5 years. Address, Pavo, 
Ga. 

Mattie Mark McGee, Harris Co. English-Latin Diploma. Teacher 
in LaGrange City Schools since graduation. 

Clara Lucile Xolen, Butts Co. English-Latin Diploma. Teacher 
2 years at Locust Grove, 4 years at Jackson, Ga. 1911-12 
student at University of Chicago. Home address, Jackson, 
Ga. 

Clare DuBose O'Connor, Glynn Co. English-Latin Diploma. 
Teacher 1 year Burke Co. Address 640 Highland Ave., At- 
lanta, Ga. 

Willie Clay O'Neal, Harris Co. English-Latin Diploma. Teacher 
1 year Lanett, Ala. P. O. West Point, Ga. 

Frances Adeline Park, DeKalb Co. English Diploma. Teacher 
1 year Sugar Valley, Ga., 3 month Eastman, Ga., 1 year at 
Cochran, Ga., 1 year at Hawkinsville, Ga., 2 years at Lith- 
onia, Ga. Home address, Lithonia, Ga. 

Kate Florence Peacock, Morgan Co. Elective Diploma. Teacher 
1 year at Reese, Ga. Teacher Madison, Ga., Public Schools 
since 1906. 

Emma Elizabeth Perry, Laurens Co. English Diploma. Teacher 
1 year at Rabun Gap. Founder and principal Poplar Springs 
Industrial School, Dublin, Ga., R. F. D. No. 4. 

Fannie Coile Pittard, Clarke Co. English-Latin-Greek Diploma. 
Teacher 2 years at Monticello, Ga. Now Mrs. D. T. Pye, 
Monticello, Ga. 

James Thomas Pittman, Quitman Co. English-Latin Diploma. 
Teacher 4 years Lavonia, Ga. Now doing farm demonstra- 
tion work in Decatur Co. Address, Allapulgus, Ga. 

Virginia Porter, Hall Co. English-Latin Diploma. Teacher 1 
year in Gainesville, Ga., 1 year in Lithonia, Ga., 2 years in 
Cordele, Ga., 1 year in Winder, Ga. Teacher in Vienna, Ga., 
since 1910. 



120 



Alice Lisle Pritchard, Fulton Co. English-Latin-French Diploma. 
Teacher 4 years Assistant Dept. Pedagogy, State Xormai 
School. Assistant Dept. Mathematics, S. X. S., 1 year. Stu- 
dent University of Chicago 1910-11. Now teacher of Phy- 
siography and Psychology at the I. I. and C, Columbus, .Miss. 

Ruth Reid, Putnam Co. English-Special Manual Arts Diploma. 
Now Mrs. P. L.Watson, Swainsboro, Ga. 

Annie May Renfroe, Muscogee Co. English-Latin Diploma. 
Teacher 2 years Practice School of State Xormai School, Ath- 
ens, Ga. Now teacher Columbus Public Schools. 

Annie Woodsie Richardson, Harris Co. English-Latin Diploma. 
Teacher 2 years Acton, Ga., 2 years at Richland, Ga., teacher 
at Chipley, Ga., since 1909. 

Bonnie Scotland Rosa Ross, Glynn Co. English Diploma. Teach- 
er Brunswick City Schools since graduation. 

Sarah Frances Sale, Wilkes Co. English-Special Manual Arts 
Diploma. Teacher 3 years, Assistant Domestic Arts and Sci- 
ences , State Xormai School, Athens, Ga. Graduate of 
Teachers' College, New York. Now teacher of Household 
Arts, State Xormai School, Harrisonburg, Va. 

Meta Holt Scarlett, Glynn Co. English-Special Manual Arts di- 
ploma. Teacher 3 years College Park. Now teaching in At- 
lanta City Schools. 

Birdie Scott, Warren Co. English-Special Manual Arts Diploma. 
Married Dr. C. S. Floyd, Loganville, Ga., died Steptember, 
1910. 

Mary Melson Simms, Floyd Co. English-Latin Diploma. Teacher 
3 years Floyd County. Now teaching in Model School, Rome, 
Ga. Home address, Cave Springs, Ga. 

Annie Laura Smith, Butts Co. English Diploma. Three years 
Co-Principal Flovilla High School. Teacher at McDonough, 
Ga., since 1908. 

Maude Tallulah Smith, Butts Co. English-Latin Diploma. Three 
years Co-Principal Flovilla High School. Now teacher Do- 
mestic Science, Agricultural School, Barnesville, Ga. 

Dora Lee Snead, Fayette Co. English-Latin Diploma. Teacher 
since graduation in Fayette County Schools. Address, Wool- 
sey, Ga. 



121 



Isabel Mary Stephens, Pulton Co. English Diploma. Teacher 2 
years in Atlanta Public Schools. 

Laura Stilwell, Elbert Co. English-Special Manual Arts Diploma. 
Teacher 1 year in Elberton. Now teaching in Training 
School of William and Mary, and teacher of music in William 
and Mary College, Williamsburg, Va. 

Henrietta Jane Stuart, Screven Co. English Diploma. Teacher 
6 years Screven Co. Address, Sylvania, Ga. 

Cordelia Shelby Thornton, Clarke Co. English-Latin Diploma. 
Teacher summer school Madison Co. Teacher Athens City 
Schools 5 years. Since 1910 teacher in Americus City 
Schools. 

Daisy Elliott Ticknor, Muscogee Co. English Diploma. Teacher 
2 years Episcopal School, Norcross, Ga., 2 years in Albany, 
Ga., Public Schools. Since 1909 teacher in Columbus, Ga., 
Public Schools. 

Charles Alfred Warnock, Bulloch Co. English-Latin Diploma. 
2 years Principal school at Blitch, Ga., 1 year at Register, 
Ga., 1 year at Bagdad, Fla., 1 year at Metter, Ga. Since 
1910 druggist at Register, Ga. 

Amy Wesley, DeKalb Co. English Diploma. Teacher in Doug- 
las Co. 2 years. Now teacher near Lithonia, Ga. 

Ethel Dean White, Coweta Co. Now Mrs. A. W. Smith, Appling, 
Ga. English-Latin Diploma. Teacher 1 year at Grantville. 

Bennie Ellen Witcher, Greene Co. English-Latin Diploma. 
Teacher 2 years Public Schools Lumber City, Ga., 2 years 
Bronwood, Ga., one-half year Claxton, Ga. Now Mrs. H. W. 
Shepard, Claxton, Ga. 

Frances Rebman Wrench, Glynn Co. English-Diploma. Teacher 
1 year at Pavo and 1 year in Brunswick City Schools. Stu- 
dent at University of Chicago. Teacher 2 years in Minne- 
apolis, Minn., Schools. Address 111 Royalston Ave., Minne- 
apolis, Minn. 

Olivia Young, Coweta Co. English-Special Manual Arts. Teacher 
1 year Associate Principal White Oak High School. Teacher 
private Kindergarten, Newnan, Ga., two years. Now Princi- 
pal Murray St. School, Newnan, Ga. 



122 



Certificates Issued 1905. 

Margaret Belle Heard, Greene Co. Certificate in English Branch- 
es. Teacher 1 year Iron City Schools. Now Mrs. George 
Hagan, Iron City, Ga. 

Ruth Edwards Jones, Clarke Co. Certificate English, Latin. 
Teacher 3 years in Winterville, Ga. One year in Athens 
City Schools. Now Mrs. F. N. Drewry, Athens, Ga. 

Lula L. Kingsberry, Carroll Co. Certificate Literature, French, 
Pedagogy, History. Teacher 3 years College Park. Now 
Principal in Atlanta City Schools. 

Mary Frank Thomas, Hancock Co. Certificate English Course 
except Manual Arts. Teacher 3 years Griffin, Ga. Now Mrs. 
Cleveland Pope, Condor, Ga. 

Susie Young, Coweta Co. Now Mrs. Awtry, Athens, Ga. Certifi- 
cate Manual Arts. 

1906. 

Anna Eugenia Aiken, Morgan Co. English-Latin-Manual Arts- 
Domestic Science Diploma. Teacher 2 years country and 
village schools. Teacher 2 years in Louisiana. Now sten- 
ographer in Atlanta. Home address, Newborn, Ga., R. F. D. 

Ruth Anderson, Morgan Co. English-French-Manual Arts-Domes- 
tic Science Diploma. Teacher Bostwick, Ga. 

Sallie W. Anderson, Chatham Co. Elective Diploma. Now teach- 
er in Live Oak, Fla. 

Susie Saxon Anderson, Cobb Co. Elective Diploma. Teacher 
Marietta, Ga. 

Lottie Louise Barnes, Muscogee Co. English-Latin-French-Ger- 
man-Manual-Arts-Domestic Science Diploma. Teacher in Co- 
lumbus City Schools, Columbus, Ga., since graduation. At 
present teaching Manual Arts in the Primary Industrial 
School. 

Ruth Bartlett, Muscogee Co. English-German-Manual Arts-Do- 
mestic Science Diploma. Teacher at Jesup, Ga. Later teach- 
er in Columbus, Ga. Teacher in Vidette, Ga. 

Mary Brady, Chatham Co. English-Manual Arts-Domestic Science 
Diploma. Has never taught. Bookkeeper in Savannah. Ad- 
dress 619 Montgomery St. 



123 



Sara Clanton Brumby, Cobb Co. Elective Diploma. Now Mrs. 
Roger Dewar, Marietta, Ga. 

J. Philander Campbell, Bartow Co. English-Greek-Manual Arts- 
Domestic Science Diploma. Teacher one year at Euharlee, 
Ga. At work in U. S. Department of Agriculture, with head- 
quarters at Washington, D. C, two years. Now organizer of 
Corn Clubs, State College of Agriculture, Athens, Ga. 

Ina Chaffin, Jasper Co. English-Manual Arts-Domestic Science 
Diploma. Teacher 3 years in village schools. Now Mrs. W. 
C. Cornwall, Monticello, Ga., R. F. D. 

Ethel Chavous, Laurens Co. Elective Diploma. Now Mrs. G. H. 
Ware, Dudley, Ga. 

S. Mark Cown, Walton Co. English-Latin-Manual Arts Diploma. 
Teacher 2 years. Now doing Farmers' Cooperative Demon- 
stration work, with headquarters at Union City, Ga. District 
Agent and Assistant State Agent for Georgia. 

Carrie Dawson, Bulloch Co. English-Manual Arts-Domestic Sci- 
ence Diploma. Teacher one year at Stateboro, Ga. Now 
teacher Dublin, Ga. 

Ada Lee Davis, Richmond Co. English-Latin-Manual Arts-Domes- 
tic Science Diploma. Teacher Augusta Orphans' Home. Lat- 
er teacher at Quitman, Ga. Now Mrs. John Whipple, Quit- 
man, Ga. 

Lizzie Hattie Dillard, Oglethorpe Co. English-Latin-Manual Arts- 
Domestic Science Diploma. Teacher 3 years at Demorest, Ga. 
Teacher in Clarke Co. schools. Now teaching at Senoia, Ga. 
Home address, Arnoldsville, Ga., R. F. D. 

May Fluker, Wilkes Co. Elective Diploma. Teacher three years 
in Washington, Ga. Now teaching fourth grade Hill Street 
School, Atlanta. Address, 176 Sinclair Ave., Atlanta, Ga. 

Ella Foy, Taylor Co. English-Manual Arts-Domestic Science Di- 
ploma. Teacher in Calhoun, Ga. Teacher at Tifton, Ga. 
Now at Butler, Ga. 

Lena Franklin, Richmond Co. English-Latin-Manual Arts-Do- 
mestic Science Diploma. Teacher 3 years Augusta City 
Schools, Augusta, Ga., 1V 2 years Blakely Institute, Blakely, 
Ga. Now Mrs. J. E. Freeman, Blakely, Ga. 



124 



Nettie Ward Frierson, Taylor Co. English-Manual Arts-Domestic 
Science Diploma. Teacher near Barnesville, Ga., R. F. D. No. 
2. Home address, Butler, Ga. 

Louise Gaissert, Hancock Co. English-Latin-Domestic Science 
Diploma. Teacher near Sparta, Ga. 

Wesley L. Harris, Gordon Co. English-Greek Diploma. Teacher 
since graduation in schools of Henry, Gordon, and Spalding 
counties. Now principal of Vaughn Graded School, Vaughn, 
Ga. 

Elizabeth Hazlehurst, Chatham Co. Elective Diploma. Teacher 
at Egypt, Ga., 2 years. Teacher in Primary Department, Sa- 
vannah Public Schools, 2 years. Now Mrs. John E. Foye, 
5 E. Fortieth St., Savannah, Ga. 

Josie Head, Walton Co. English-Manual Arts-Domestic Science 
Diploma. Teacher in country schools 1 year. Teacher in 
Baxley, Ga. Now Mrs. H. L. Williams, Baxley, Ga. 

Georgia Hunt, Cobb Co. English-Latin-Manual Arts-Domestic 
Science Diploma. Teacher in Valdosta, Ga., 1 year. Teacher 
in Marietta since 190 7. Now teacher of English in Marietta 
High School. Address, 10 9 Forrest Ave., Marietta, Ga. 

Marwood Johnston, Bibb Co. Elective Diploma. 80 West Har- 
ris St., Atlanta, Ga. 

Olive Kingsbery, Carroll Co. Elective Diploma. Teacher in Ful- 
ton County. 1909-'10 at Eustis, Fla. 

Martha Tryphosa Marshall, Fulton Co. Elective Diploma. Died 
soon after graduation. 

Cora Murray, Wilkes Co. English-Manual Arts-Domestic Science 
Diploma. Home address, Tignall, Ga. Has taught every 
year since graduation. For the past 3 years principal of the 
Wiersdale School, Weirsdale, Fla. 

Pansy Montfort, Taylor Co. English-Manual Arts-Domestic Sci- 
ence Diploma. Teacher 1 year in Adel, Ga. Died May 8, 
1907. 

Addie Parker, Harris Co. English-Domestic Science-Manual Arts 
Diploma. Home address, West Point, Ga. Teacher country 
schools of Harris County 4 years, West Point school 1 year. 
Now Mrs. Charles Williams. 



125 



Ethel Ashford Pierce, Muscogee Co. Elective Diploma. Teacher 
Lumpkin, Ga., 1 year. Since 1907, teacher at Brunswick, 
Ga. Address 1526 Union St., Brunswick, Ga. Home address, 
Smith Station, Ala. 

Loraine M. Proctor, Chatham Co. Elective Diploma. Teacher 1 
year at Euharlee, Ga. Now Mrs. J. P. Campbell, Athens, Ga. 

Louise Ralf, Cobb Co. Elective Diploma. Teacher in Siloam. 

Eula L. Rogers, Wilcox Co. English-Manual Arts-Domestic Sci- 
ence Diploma. Teacher half year at Temple, Ga. Teacher at 
Culloden, Ga. Teacher at Lawrenceville, Ga. Teacher at 
East Point, Ga. 

Mamie L. Ross, Glynn Co. Elective Diploma. Teacher in Bruns- 
wick, Ga., 4 years. Teacher in Tucson, Ariz., 1910-'ll. Ad- 
dress 27 W. 17th St. 

Louise Sale, Lincoln Co. English-Latin-Manual Arts-Domestic 
Science Diploma. Teacher in Danielsville, Ga. Now Mrs. 
Nat Bulloch, Danielsville, Ga. 

Ruth Sale, Lincoln Co. English-Latin-Manual Arts-Domestic Sci- 
ence Diploma. Teacher 1 year in Jesup, Ga. Now teaching 
in Columbus, Ga. 

Gertrude Scott, Greene Co. English-Latin-Domestic Science Di- 
ploma. Teacher in Brunswick, Ga. 

Janet Slade, Carroll Co. Elective Diploma. Teacher one-half 
year at Newnan, Ga. Teacher in Carrollton, Ga., since 1907. 

Clifford Speights, Baldwin Co. English-Latin-Manual Arts-Domes- 
tic Science Diploma. Teacher at Meriwether, Ga., two years. 
Teacher in Dahlonega, Ga., three years. Now teacher in 
Griffin, Ga. Home address, Milledgeville, Ga. 

Louise Standley, Terrell Co. English-Latin-French-Manual Arts- 
Domestic Science Diploma. Teacher in Fitzgerald, Ga. Now 
in DeRidder, La. 

Annie Tabachiek, Haralson Co. Elective Diploma. Teacher in 
Cameron, La. 

Reba Truitt, Wilkes Co. English-Domestic Science-German Di- 
ploma. Home address, Metasville, Ga., R. F. D. No. 1. Teach- 
er at Maxim, Ga. Teacher at Apalachee, Ga., 1910-'ll. 



126 



Sarah Tuck, Clarke Co. English-Manual Arts-Domestic Science 
Diploma. Teacher in Winterville, Ga. Now teacher in At- 
lanta. Address, 144 Fulton St. 

Nobie Walters, Hart Co. English-Latin-Domestic Science Diplo- 
ma. Teacher in Sparks, Ga. Teacher in Nashville, Ga. 

Lavilla Ward, Fulton Co. English-Manual Arts-Domestic Science 
Diploma. Teacher in Georgia School for the Deaf. Studied 
1 year in Clarke School, Northampton, Mass. Address, Cave 
Spring, Ga. 

Sarah Ward, Butts Co. English-Domestic Science-German Diplo- 
ma. Teacher 1 year in Lifsey, Ga. Teacher in Poplar Springs 
Industrial School, near Dublin, Ga. Now student in Univer- 
sity of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn. Home address, Cork, Ga. 

Nellie Weldon, Pike Co. Elective Diploma. Teacher in Griffin, 
Ga. Teacher in Monticello, Ga. Now teaching in Quincy, 
Fla. Home address, Barnesville, Ga. 

Edythe White, Madison Co. English-Latin-Manual Arts-Domestic 
Science Diploma. Teacher in Carlton, Ga. Teacher in Mc- 
Donough, Ga., 3 years. Teacher in Danielsville, Ga. 

Nancy White, Madison Co. English-Manual Arts-Domestic Science 
Diploma. Teacher 2 years in Madison County schools, 1 year 
at Danielsville. Teacher at Carlton, Ga., since 1909. 

Flora Wilson, Gwinnett Co. English-Manual Arts-Domestic Sci- 
ence Diploma. Teacher at Dunwoody, Ga., Hoschton, Ga., 
and Lawrenceville, Ga. Teacher at Buford, Ga., since 1909. 

Henry Etter Wilt, Fulton Co. English-Latin-French-German- 
Manual Arts-Domestic Science Diploma. Teacher one year in 
Euharlee, Ga. Teacher in Fulton County four years. Now 
principal College Park High School. Address, 303 Spring 
St., Atlanta, Ga. 

Lois Witcher, Clarke Co. English-Latin-Domestic Science Diplo- 
ma. Took post-graduate course in Manual Arts and German 
at S. N. S. Studied at Teachers' College, New York City. 
Now teaching Domestic Science in Athens City Schools. 

Pauline Wood, Polk Co. English-Latin-Domestic Science Diplo- 
ma. Home address, Cedartown, Ga. Teaching at Moultrie, 
Ga. 



127 



Joseph Whatley Woodfin, Chatham Co. English-German-Manual 
Arts-Domestic Science Diploma. Teacher in Savannah City 
Schools. Now teaching in Tucson, Ariz. Address, 735 South 
7th Ave., Tucson, Ariz. 

Certificates Issued in 1906. 

Annie Colclough, Greene Co. Home address, Penfield, Ga. Has 
taught ever since graduation. Four years at Shiloh, Greene 
County, Ga. Now Principal Mercer High School, Penfield, 
Ga. 

Edith Creswell, Walton Co. Teacher in Dovedale, Ga., one year. 
Now teaching at Monroe, Ga. 

Marie Doellmann, Clarke Co. P. O. Orlando, Fla. Now Mrs. 
William Holtz. 

Mary Dwelle, Chatham Co. Teacher in Practice School, S. N. S.,. 
Athens, Ga. Teacher of History in Brunswick High School. 
Now Mrs. Frank O. Ticknor, Albany, Ga. 

Christine Garnett, Chatham Co. Teacher at Iron City, Ga., Win- 
terville, Ga., Girard, Ala., and Midville, Ga. Now in High 
School at Midville, Ga. 

Susie Gholston, Madison Co. Teacher three years in rural schools 
in Madison and Oglethorpe Counties, and one year in High 
School, Kissimee, Fla. Now Mrs. J. A. Glenn, Hull, Ga., R. 

F. D. 

Eiver Johnson, Muscogee Co. Teacher in Camilla, Ga., one year 
Deceased. 

Nellie Johnston, Twiggs Co. Teacher at Round Oak, Ga. 

Emmie Moore, Jackson Co. Teacher at Maysville, Ga. Now Mrs. 

G. R. Mason, Commerce, Ga. 

Nora Sands, Troup Co. Teacher at Roanoke, Ga. Now Mrs. Geo. 
Smart, Five Forks, Ala. 

Pope Thurmond, Walton Co. Teacher at Morganton, Ga. Now 
Mrs. F. P. Singleton, Copper Hill, Tenn. 

Estelle Woodward, Henry Co. Teacher at McDonough, Ga. 
Teacher three years at Hampton, Ga. Now teaching near- 
Griffin. Address, Griffin, Ga. 



128 



Regular Diplomas Granted May 17, 1907. 

"Lucie Marvin Adams, Juliette, Monroe Co. Regular Diploma — ■ 
English, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teacher one year 
at Commerce, Ga., and one year at Forsyth, Ga. Now in 
charge of the Department of Physical Culture in the South- 
ern Female College, LaGrange, Ga. 

John William Davis, Ivanhoe, Bulloch Co. Regular Diploma — 
English, Manual Arts. Principal Barwick High School since 
graduation. Address, Barwick, Ga. 

Ernest Dillard, Calhoun, Gordon Co. Regular Diploma — English, 
Latin. Principal West Point (Ga.) Public Schools. Now 
County School Commissioner, Gordon County. Address, Cal- 
houn, Ga. 

Sidney Bertha Dunevent, Apalachee, Morgan Co. Regular Diplo- 
ma — English, Latin, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teach- 
er one year at Tennille, Ga. Teacher three years in Wesley 
Chapel High School. Now in Ararat High School, both in 
Putnam County, near Eatonton, Ga. Address, Nona, Ga. 

Caroline Elizabeth Godard, Milner, Pike Co. Regular Diploma — 
English, Latin, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Now Mrs. 
J. C. Means, Sycamore, Ga. 

Ethel Claudine Greiner, Waynesboro, Burke Co. Regular Diplo- 
ma — English, Latin, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teacher 
at Sylvania, 6a. 

Alma Eleanor Ley, Warrenton, Warren Co. Regular Diploma — 
English, Latin, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teacher one 
year at Hepzibah, Ga., one year at Dexter, Ga., one year at 
Clarkston, Ga. Teacher at Iron City, Ga., since 1910. 

Bessie Jenkins, Chipley, Harris Co. Regular Diploma — English, 
Latin, German, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teacher at 
Chipley, Ga., since graduation. 

Roy Roberta Kincaid, Griffin, Spalding Co. Regular Diploma — 
English, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teacher in Griffin, 
Ga., four years. Now Mrs. J. II. MeLaurin, Log Cabin 
Heights, Macon, Ga. 

Brandt Laboon, Monroe, Route 7, Walton Co. Regular Diploma — 
English, French. .Manual Aits. Teacher G. M . A., College 
Park, Ga., one year. Later graduate University of Georgia. 

Now teaching in District Agricultural School, .Madison, (la. 



129 



Edith Ledbetter, Lavonia, Franklin Co. Regular Diploma — Eng- 
lish, Latin, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teacher 2 years 
at Lavonia, Ga. Teacher at Donalsonville, Ga. 

Carrie Orr Mitchell, Vienna, Dooly Co. Regular Diploma — Eng- 
lish, Domestic Science, Manual Arts. Teacher one year in 
Unadilla High School, two years Vienna High School, one 
year in Taylor Co. school. Now teaching at Howard, Ga. 

Essie Mitchell, Vienna, Dooly Co. Regular Diploma — English, 
Latin, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teacher one year 
Unadilla High School, two years principal Tippettville School, 
two years in Griffin, Ga., public schools. Now teacher Rural 
School, State Normal School. 

Mary Edward Mitchell, Mt. Zion, Carroll Co. Regular Diploma — 
English, German, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teacher 
Elementary School, S. N. S., five years. Now teacher Sa- 
vannah City Schools. Home address, Bremen, Ga. 

Alice Roberta McCollum, Dawson, Terrell Co. Regular Diploma — 
English, French, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teacher 
two years Commerce, Ga. Married Mr. H. P. Holbrook, 1909. 
Died Dec. 24, 1909. 

Alma Leona McCulloch, Broxton, Coffee Co. Regular Diploma — 
English, Latin. Teacher Brunswick, Ga., two years. Teacher 
in Griffin, Ga., two years. Rural School Extension worker in 
Laurens County one year. Present address, Burlington, N. C. 

i*iary McGee, LaGrange, Troup Co. Regular Diploma — English, 
Latin, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teacher one year 
Dawson, Ga. Teacher one year McDonald Institute, Durango, 
Mex. Teacher in LaGrange, Ga., two years. Now Mrs. Thom- 
as Watson, Durango, Mex. 

Ruth McKie, Athens, Clarke Co. Regular Diploma — English, 
Latin. Teacher Athens, Ga., Public Schools since graduation. 

Ruby Dorothea Nabers, Madison, Morgan Co. Regular Diploma — 
English, Latin, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teacher 2 
years Tennille, Ga. Teacher Hartwell, Ga. 1909-1910. Now 
married. P. O. Davisboro, Ga. 

Mary Angie Oates, Louisville, Jefferson Co. Regular Diploma — 
English, Latin, German, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. 
Teacher Vidette, Ga. Now Mrs. Q. A. Mulkey, Vidette, Ga. 



130 



KatherineDoris Ozmer, Lithonia, DeKalb Co. Regular Diploma — 
English, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teacher since grad- 
uation in Atlanta City Schools. Now assistant principal High- 
land School. Address, 7 W. Fifteenth St. 

Clara Aline Pope, Dublin, Laurens Co. Regular Diploma — Eng- 
lish, German, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teacher coun- 
try and village schools since graduation. Address, Dublin, 
Ga. 

John Monroe Prance, Blackwells, Cobb Co. Regular Diploma — 
English, Latin, Manual Arts. Teaching in Agricultural 
School, Americus, Ga. 

Ina Bell Prater, Athens, Clarke Co. Regular Diploma — English. 
Teacher one year. Now Mrs. Dozier Hawks, Fife, Ga. 

Henry Tucker Singleton, Bluffton, Clay Co. Regular Diploma — - 
English, Latin, Manual Arts. Student one year University of 
Georgia. Teacher three years at Carnegie and Edison, Ga. 
Now studying law, University of Georgia. 

Alice Cleveland Smith, Cartersville, Bartow Co. Regular Diploma 
— English, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teaching in At- 
lanta. Address, 680 Washington St. 

Grover Cleveland Spillers, Musella, Crawford Co. Regular Diplo- 
ma — English, Latin. Graduate law, University of Georgia. 

Maude Steedman, Athens, Clarke Co. Regular Diploma — English, 
Latin, Domestic Science. Teacher two years Lumpkin, Ga. 

Sarah Frances Thompson, Mathews, Jefferson Co. Regular Di- 
ploma — English, Latin, German, Manual Arts, Domestic Sci- 
ence. Now Mrs. Salter Barron, Milner, Ga., R. F. D. 

Annie Sue Waidrop, Flovilla, Butts Co. Regular Diploma — Eng- 
lish, French, German, Domestic Science. Teacher at Hart- 
well, Ga. Teacher at Elberton, Ga. 

Lois Claire White, Louisville, Jefferson Co. Regular Diploma — 
English, Latin, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Now Mrs. 
L. Robert Patton, Hart well, Ga. 

Margaret Cornelia Williamson, Brunswick, Glynn Co. Regular 
Diploma- English, Manual Arts. Domestic Science. Teacher 
Brunswick, Ga., since graduation. 



131 



Lillian Winter, Winterville, Clarke Co. Regular Diploma-— Eng- 
lish, Latin, German, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teacher 
at Winterville, Ga. Teacher at Griffin, Ga. Address, 123 
Tenth street. 

Mai Wynn, Meriwether, Madison Co. Regular Diploma— English,, 
Latin, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teacher one year at 
Thomson, Ga. Now Mrs. C. B. Ayres, Madison, Ga. 

Willie Douglas Woodward, Jenkinsburg, Butt Co. Regular Diplo- 
ma — English, Latin, Domestic Science. Teacher in Bruns- 
wick, Ga., since graduation. 

Elective Diplomas Granted May 27, 1907. 

Carlotta Rosa Alexander, Washington, Wilkes Co. Elective Di- 
ploma — English, Literature, Mathematics, Geography, Nature 
Study, Agriculture, Pedagogy, History, French, Manual Arts, 
Domestic Science, Common School Music. Student one year 
University of Chicago. Teacher Elementary School, S. N. S., 
three years. Now student University of Chicago. 

Sara Augusta Carr, Maysville, Banks Co. Elective Diploma — 
English, Literature, Geography and Nature Study, Agrciul- 
ture, Pedagogy, Physical Culture, Domestic Science, Common 
School Music. Teacher in Morgan Co. Teacher at Colbert, 
Ga. 

Bessie Durand Hanks, Pelham, Mitchell Co. Electice Diploma — 
English, Literature, Geography and Nature Study, Agricul- 
ture, Pedagogy, History, Manual Arts, Domestic Science, 
Common-School Music. Home address, Summit Hill, Macon, 
Ga. Teacher one year in Webster County, one year in Ea- 
tonton High School. Since 1909 teacher in Rochelle High 
School. 

Hazel Frederica Howard, Columbus, Muscogee Co. Elective Di- 
ploma — English, Literature, Geography and Nature Study, 
Agriculture, Pedagogy, History, Physical Culture, Manual 
Arts, Domestic Science, Common-School Music. Teacher 
country schools 2 years. Teacher in Columbus Public Schools 
since 1909. Home address, Marion, Ala. 

Fannie Hayward Howard, Savannah, Chatham Co. Elective Di- 
ploma — English, Geography and Nature Study, Agriculture, 
Pedagogy, Physical Culture, Manual Arts, Domestic Science, 
Common-School Music. Teacher in Savannah City Schools, 
since graduation. Address 208 W. Walburg St. 



132 



Derrelle DuBose Kilpatrick, Hephzibah, Richmond Co. Elective 
Diploma — English, Literature, Science, Geography and Na- 
ture Study, Agriculture, Pedagogy, History, Common-School 
Music, French, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teacher at 
Waynesboro, Ga. 

Olivia Josephine Montfort, Butler, Taylor Co. Elective Diploma — 
English, Literature, Mathematics, Geography and Nature 
Study, Agriculture, Pedagogy, Manual Arts, Domestic Sci- 
ence, Common-School Music. Teacher four years Lumpkin, 
Ga. Now teaching in Cordele City Schools. 

Leola McDorman, Athens, Clarke Co. Elective Diploma — Englsih, 
Literature, Mathematics, Geography and Nature Study, Agri- 
culture, Pedagogy, Manual Arts, Domestic Science, Common- 
School Music. Teacher in Athens City Schools since 'gradua- 
tion. 

Mary Louis Richards, Americus, Sumter Co. Elective Diploma — 
English, Literature, Geography and Nature Study, Agricul- 
ture, Pedagogy, Physical Culture, Manual Arts, Domestic 
Science, Common-School Music. Teacher at Lumpkin, Ga. 
Teacher in Hurtsboro, Ala. 

Annie Singellton, Columbus, Muscogee Co. Elective Diploma — 
English, Geography and Nature Study, Agriculture, Pedago- 
gy, Physical Culture, Manual Arts, Common-School Music. 
Teacher in South Plainfleld, N. J. 

Sarah Wiley Smith, Sparta, Hancock Co. Elective Diploma — 
English, Geography and Nature Study, Agriculture, Peda- 
gogy, Common-School Music. Now Mrs. Alex Carnes, Box 
Springs, Ga. 

Nettie DuBose Swinton, Savannah, Chatham Co. Elective Diplo- 
ma — English, Mathematics, Geography and Nature Study, 
Agriculture, Pedagogy, Physical Culture, Manual Arts, Do- 
mestic Science, Common-School Music. Teacher in Live Oak, 
Pla. 

Mary Lou Watkins, Opelika, Ala., Lee Co. Elective Diploma — 
English, Mathematics, Science, Geography and Nature Study, 
Agriculture, Pedagogy, Domestic Science. Teacher one year 
in Conyers, Ga. 

Carrie Ama Wier, Athens, Clarke Co. Elective Diploma — English, 
Geography and Nature Study, Agriculture, Pedagogy, Manual 
Arts, Latin, Common-School Music. Teacher four months 
Athens City Schools. Now Mrs. Henry Stradley, Greenville, 
S. C. 

133 



Agnes Bostrick Wilhite, Winder, Jackson Co. Elective Diploma — 
English, Literature, Geography and Nature Study, Agricul- 
ture, Pedagogy, Manual Arts, Domestic Science, Common- 
School Music. Now teaching in Atlanta schools. Address 
2 61 N. Boulevard. 

Certificates of Completion Issued May 27, 1907. 

Sophia Theresa Wilhelmina Anneberg, Augusta, Richmond Co. 
Certificate — English, Literature, Science, Geography and Na- 
ture Study, Agriculture, Pedagogy, History, Physical Cul- 
ture, German, Manual Arts, Domestic Science, Common- 
School Music. Teaching in Augusta City School. Address, 
132 3 Druid Park Ave. 

Willie Helen Cartledge, Augusta, Richmond Co. Certificate — 
English, Literature, Science, Geography and Nature Study, 
Agriculture, Pedagogy, History, Physical Culture, Manual 
Arts, Domestic Science. Now Mrs. Harry Bell, Augusta, Ga. 

Leo Maurice Hannah, Walnut Grove, Walton Co. Certificate — 
English, Literature, Mathematics, Geography and Nature 
Study, Agriculture, History, Physical Culture. No report. 

Ruth Thurmond, Monroe, Walton Co. Certificate — English, Lit- 
erature, Science, Geography and Nature Study, Agriculture, 
History, Physical Culture, Domestic Science, Common-School 
Music. Married and living in Atlanta. 

Kittie Sligh, Red Hill, Franklin Co. Certificate — English, Math- 
ematics, Science, Geography and Nature Study, Agriculture, 
Physical Culture, Common-School Music. Teacher at Seneca, 
S. C. 

Clifton Wing, Macon, Bibb Co. Certificate — Manual Arts. 

Regular Diplomas Issued June 1, 1 90S. 

Walter Green Acree, Blue Springs, Gordon Co. Regular Diploma. 
English, Manual Arts. President District Agricultural School, 
Tifton, Ga., for two years. Now student at University of 
Georgia. 

Julia Roberts Allen, Conyers, Rockdale, Go. Regular Diploma — 
English, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teaching in Con- 
yers, Ga. 



134 



Helen Celeste Brewer, Commerce, Jackson Co. Regular Diploma 
— English, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teacher at War- 
renton one year, Baxley, Ga., two years, Cedartown one-half 
year. Now taking library course in Atlanta. 

James Wofford Cole, Dallas, Paulding Co. Regular Diploma — 
English, Manual Arts. Teacher two years Union Public 
School, Dallas, Ga. ; assistant cashier Commercial Savings 
Bank, Dallas, but resigned to become principal of Hitchcock 
Local Tax District School, Dallas. 

Ida Estelle Dunlap, Winterville, Clarke Co. Regular Diploma — 
English, Latin, German. Teacher one year at Whaiey. Xow 
Mrs. B. P. Herndon. Teaching at Powelton. 

Susan Elsie Edwards, Winterville, Clarke Co. Regular Diploma — 
English, Latin, French, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. 
Teacher at Woodbury, Ga. Xow teaching at Greenville, Ga. 

EIna Leola Edwards, Oxford, Route 2, Newton Co. Regular Di- 
ploma — English, Domestic Science. Teacher near Oxford, 
Ga. Xow Mrs. Geo. Lockwell, Oxford, Ga. 

Mary Alma Greene, Tallapoosa, Haralson Co. Regular Diploma — 
English, Manual Arts. Teacher one year Hapeville, Ga. Xo>v 
teaching in Hawkinsville, Ga. 

Clara Knox Henry, Rome, Floyd Co. Regular English Diploma. 
Teacher in Benedict School, Cedartown, Ga.. three years. 
Xow Mrs. Hey ward Brumby, 2 66 Crew street, Atlanta. Ga. 

Louise Cook Johnson, Columbus, Muscogee Co. Regular Diplo- 
ma — English, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teaching in 
Columbus City Schools. 

Rosa Katherine LeVere, Augusta, Richmond Co. Regular Diplo- 
ma — English, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teacher one 
year in Fulton County schools. Teaching now near Sparta, 
Ga. 

Martha Annie Mathews, Carlton, Route 1, Madison Co. Regular 
Diploma — English, Latin. Teacher 2 years near Carlton. Ga» 
One year at Baxley, Ga. Xow assistant teacher Mathematics, 
S. X. s. 

Minnie Hendrick, Rockmart. Polk Co. Elective Diploma — Eng- 
lish, Nature study and Geography, Science, Pedagogy, Agri- 
culture, Common-School .Music Physical Culture, French, 



135 



Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teacher one year Piedmont 
Institute, Rockmart, Ga. Principal McGarity's School, near 
Temple, Ga., one year. Since then principal of Union School, 
near Draketown, Ga. 

Zoe Hightower, Dublin, Laurens Co. Elective Diploma — Litera- 
ture, Science, Pedagogy, Agriculture, Common-School Music, 
Physical Culture, Manual Arts. Teacher three years at Dub- 
lin. Now teaching at Pairburn, Ga. 

Hazel Hartwell Holt, Eatonton, Putnam Co. Elective Diploma— - 
English, Literature, Pedagogy, Agriculture, Common-School 
Music, Physical Culture, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. 
Teacher one year at Quitman, Ga. Now teaching for Acad- 
emy for Blind, Macon, Ga. Address, Box 85. 

Anna Kirtley, Atlanta, Fulton Co. Elective Diploma — English, 
Literature, Pedagogy, Agriculture, Common-School Music, 
Physical Culture. Teacher one year in Brunswick, Ga. One 
year in Atlanta City Schools. Not teaching now. Address 4 3 
E. Cain St., Atlanta. 

Minna Belle Laney, Columbus, Muscogee Co. Elective Diploma- 
English, Literature, Nature Study and Geography, History, 
Mathematics, Pedagogy, Agriculture, Common-School Music, 
Physical Culture. Teacher one year at Winterville, Ga. Now 
teaching in Columbus City Schools. 

Sallie Fannie Mann, Gay, Meriwether Co. Elective Diploma — 
English, Literature, Nature Study and Geography, Mathema- 
tics, Pedagogy, Agriculture, Common-School Music, Physical 
Culture, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teacher one year 
country school. Taught at Griffin, Ga. Now Mrs. Estes of 
Gay, Ga. 

Ollie Elizabeth Monroe, Macon, Bibb Co. Elective Diploma — - 
English, Science, Pedagogy, Agriculture, Common-School 
Music, Physical Culture, Latin, German, Domestic Science. 
Teacher country school one year. 

Laura Gladys McGill, Lithonia, Gwinnett Co. Elective Diploma — 
English, History, Science, Pedagogy, Agriculture, Physical 
Culture, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teacher Domestic 
Arts and Science, North Georgia A. & M. College, Dahlonega, 
Ga. Now teaching Domestic Science in Alabama Normal 
School. 



136 



Louise Davenport Powell, Athens, Clarke Co. Elective Diploma — 
English, Literature, Science, Pedagogy, Agriculture, Common- 
School Music, Physical Culture, Latin. Teacher one year at 
Watkinsville. Taught at Warthen, Ga. Now teaching in 
Athens City Schools. 

Sarah George Taliaferro, Columbus, Muscogee Co. Elective Di- 
ploma — Literature, Geography and Nature Study, Science, 
Mathematics, Pedagogy, Agriculture, Common-School Music, 
Physical Culture, Manual Arts. Teaching in Columbus City 
Schools. 

Bessie Erwin Miller, Athens, Clarke Co. Regular Diploma — Eng- 
lish, Latin, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teacher in Ele- 
mentary School, S. N. S., two years. Now teaching in Uni- 
versity of Chicago Elementary School. 

Matilda Grady O'Rear, White Plains, Route 2, Hancock Co. Reg- 
ular Diploma — English, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Mar- 
ried. No report about teaching. 

Jessie Leitner Redd, Columbus, Muscogee Co. Regular Diploma — 
English, French, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Assistant 
Department of History, S. N. S. 

Berta Standley, Dawson, Terrell Co. Regular Diploma — English, 
Latin, French, Domestic Science. Taught in Louisiana. Now 
Mrs. A. Wyatt Hadley, North Adams, Mass. 

Nina Mae Walker, Monticello, Jasper Co. Regular Diploma — 
English, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teacher in Monti- 
cello, Ga., two years. Now Mrs. B. B. McHlheny, Monticelio. 

Dollie Troice Walters, Athens, Clarke Co. Regular Diploma — 
English, Manual Arts. Teacher in Lumpkin Co. Teaching at 
Howersville, Ga. 

Julia Eutoka Porter, Danville, Twiggs Co. Regular Diploma — 
English, Latin, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Taught in 
Dublin. 

Elective Diplomas Issued June 1, 1908. 

Ethel Arnold, Newnan, Coweta Co. Elective Diploma — English 
Pedagogy, Agriculture, Common-School Music, Physical Cul- 
ture, Manual Arts. No report. 



137 



Annie Harris Bernard, Athens, Clarke Co. Elective Diploma — 
Literature, Pedagogy, Agriculture, German, Domestic Science, 
Teacher at Eufala, Ala., 1908-1909. Not teaching. 

Bertha Winaper Blasingame, Augusta, Richmond Co. Elective 
Diploma — English, Literature, Science, Pedagogy, Agricul- 
ture, Physical Culture, Domestic Science. Teacher at Soper- 
ton, Ga., 1908-09. 

Willie Lou Cochran, Mt. Vernon, Montgomery Co. Elective Diplo- 
ma — English Literature, Nature Study and Geography, Sci- 
ence, Mathematics, Pedagogy, Agriculture, Physical Culture, 
Manual Arts. Teacher at Soperton two and one-half years. 
Now Mrs. J. E. Hall, Soperton, Ga. 

Minnie Mae Green, Dublin, Laurens Co. Elective Diploma — Lit- 
erature, Agriculture, Pedagogy, Physical Culture, Manual 
Arts. Teaching in Dublin. 

Alice Wickham, Columbus, Muscogee Co. Elective Diploma — 
English, Literature, Geography and Nature Study, Science. 
Pedagogy, Agriculture, Common School Music, Physical Cul- 
ture, French, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Now teaching 
in public schools of Atlanta. 

Certificates of Completion Issued June 1, 1908. 

Emily Bancroft, Athens, Clarke Co. Certificate — English, His- 
tory, Science, Mathematics, Agriculture, Common-School 
Music, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Has not taught. Nov 
in Richmond, Va., studying to be a trained nurse. 

Yula Claudine Blalock, Hoschton, Jackson Co. Certificate — Eng- 
lish, Nature Study and Geography, History, Science, Mathe- 
matics, Agriculture, Common-School Music, Physical Culture, 
German, Domestic Science. Teaching since 1908 in country 
school near Hoschton. 

Mamie Lou Huff, Columbus, Muscogee Co. Certificate — Agricul- 
ture, Physical Culture, Domestic Science. Taught in Musco- 
gee Co. Now Mrs. I. L. Henderson, Columbus, Ga. 

Elliece Lona Johnson, Athens, Clarke Co. Certificate — English, 
Nature Study and Geography, History, Science, Mathematics, 
Agriculture, Common-School Music, Physical Culture, Man- 
ual Arts, Domestic Science. Teaching at Whitehall, Ga. 



138 



Berta May Nelms, Hartwell, Hart Co. Certificate — English, Lit- 
erature, Nature Study and Geography, Science, Agriculture, 
Physical Culture, Domestic Science. Teacher two years in 
Hart County school. Now teaching at Royston. 

Annie Gertrude Paradise, Amity, Route 1, Lincoln Co. Certificate 
— English, Literature, Nature Study and Geography, History, 
Science, Pedagogy, Agriculture, Common-School Music, Phy- 
sical Culture, Domestic Science. Teacher one year at Rhine, 
Ga. Graduated 1910 Woman's College, Meridian, Miss. 
Teacher one yearat Osierfield, Ga. Now principal of Bonaire 
School. 

Mamie Hines Stubbs, Adrian, Emanuel Co. Certificate — English, 
Literature, Nature Study and Geography, History, Science, 
Pedagogy, Agriculture, Common-School Music, Physical Cul- 
ture, German, Domestic Science. Married while teaching at 
Dexter, Ga. Now Mrs. T. H. Lander, Sulphur, La. 

Frances Webb, Covington, Newton Co. Certificate — English, Na- 
ture Study and Geography, Agriculture, Common-School 
Music, Physical Culture, French, Domestic Science. 

Diplomas Granted May 31, 1909. 

Sarah Kate Anderson, Luthersville, Meriwether Co. Eng. -Elective 
Man'l Arts-Dom. Sci. Diploma — English, Literature, Expres- 
sion, History, Geography and Nature Study, Elementary 
Science (Physiology, Chemistry, Physics), Elementary Agri- 
culture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Mathematics, Common- 
School Music, Physical Culture, Manual Arts, Domestic Sci- 
ence. Three years teacher of English in an American Col- 
lege in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Home address, Decatur, Ga. 

Willie Mabel Britt, Lawrenceville, Gwinnett Co. Elective Diplo- 
ma — Psychology and Pedagogy, Physical Culture, Common- 
School Music, Elementary Agriculture, Elementary Science 
(Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), Expression. Teacher at 
Winder, Ga., one year. Now teaching in the Lawrenceville 
High School. 

Ruby Kate Beauchamp, Williamson, Pike Co. Eng. -Man'l Arts- 
Dom. Sci. Diploma — Psychology and pedagogy, English, Lit- 
erature, Expression, History, Geography and Nature Study, 
Elementary Science (Physiology, Chemistry, Physics), Ele- 
mentary Agriculture, Mathematics, Common-School Music, 
Physical Culture, Manual Ai'ts. Domestic Science. Now Mrs. 
John Eugene Yarborough, East Point, Ga. 



139 



Jessie Beard, Columbus, Muscogee Co. Elective Diploma — Psy- 
chology and Pedagogy, Elementary Agriculture, Literature, 
Expression, History, Nature Study, Common-School Music, 
Domestic Science, Manual Arts (2 years), Physical Culture. 
Teaching in Columbus Schools. 

Sara Bird, Athens, Clarke Co. Elective Diploma — English, Lit- 
erature, Expression, History, Geography and Nature Study, 
Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), Ele- 
mentary Agriculture, Common-School Music, Physical Cul- 
ture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Domestic Science, Manual 
Arts. Teacher one year at Toccoa, Ga. Teacher at Law- 
renceville, Ga. 

Helena Eveline Blackwell, Chickamauga, Walker Co. English 
Diploma — Psychology and Pedagogy, Expression, English, 
Literature, History, Geography and Nature Study, Element- 
ary Science (Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), Elementary 
Agriculture, Mathematics, Common-School Music, Physical 
Culture, Manual Arts (2 years). Teacher at Chickamauga, 
Ga., one year. Now teaching at Lyons, Ga. 

Esther Margaret Clark, Brunswick, Glynn Co. Elective Diploma — ■ 
Psychology and Pedagogy, Expression, Geography, Nature 
Study, Elementary Agriculture, Elementary Science (Physi- 
ology, Chemistry, Physics), Common-School Music, Physical 
Culture, Manual Arts (2 years), Latin. 

Frances Cleo Campbell, Cartersville, Bartow Co. Elective Di- 
ploma — Expression, Elementary Science (Physiology, Chem- 
istry, Physics), Elementary Agriculture, Common-School 
Music, Physical Culture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Manual 
Arts (2 years), Domestic Science. Teacher Tallulah Falls 
Industrial School. Now Mrs. William Parody, Tallulah Falls, 
Ga. 

Annie Chapman, Lithonia, DeKalb Co. Eng.-Latin-Man'l Arts- 
Dom. Science Diploma — Psychology and Pedagogy, English, 
Literature, Expression, History, Geography and Nature Stu- 
dy, Elementary Science, Elementary Agriculture, Mathemat- 
ics, Common-School Music, Physical Culture, Domestic Sci- 
ence, Latin, Manual Arts. Teaching at Fitzpatrick, Ga. 

Frances Cheney, Athens, Clarke Co. Elective Diploma — Psychol- 
ogy and Pedagogy, Literature, Expression, History, Nature 
Study, Elementary Agriculture, Physical Culture, Domestic 
Science, Manual Arts, French. Teaching in Athens City 
Schools. 

140 



Evelyn Cory, Keller, Bryan County. Eng.-Dom. Sci.-Man'l Arts- 
Latin-German Diploma — Psychology ani Pedagogy, English, 
Literature, Expression, History, Geography and Nature Study, 
German, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, Physiol- 
ogy), Elementary Agriculture, Mathematics, Common-School 
Music, Physical Culture, Domestic Science, Manual Arts,. 
Latin. Teaching at Cobbtown, Ga. 

Edward Percival Clark, Hephzibah, Richmond Co. Elective Di- 
ploma — Psychology and Pedagogy, English, Literature, Ex- 
pression, Geography and Nature Study, Elementary Science 
(Chemistry, Physiology, Physics), Elementary Agriculture, 
Common-School Music, Physical Culture, Manual Arts, Latin, 
Greek, Mathematics. Principal Oconee High School at Wat- 
kinsville, Ga. Student University of Georgia 1911-'12. 

E. B. Davis, Stilson, Bulloch Co. English Diploma — Psychology 
and Pedagogy, English, Literature, Expression, History, Ge- 
ography and Nature Study, Elementary Science (Physiology, 
Chemistry, Physics), Elementary Agriculture, Mathematics, 
Common-School Music, Physical Culture. Assistant Princi- 
pal of Barwick High School, Barwick, Ga., one year. Princi- 
pal Shiloh School, Hahira, Ga., one year. Principal S. N. 
Chapman School, Powelton, Ga., 1911-'12. 

Lula Blanche Edwards, Oxford, Newton Co. English-Dom. Sci.- 
Manual Arts Diploma— Psychology and Pedagogy, English, 
Literature, Expression, Geography and Nature Study, History, 
Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), Ele- 
ment? ry Agriculture, Mathematics, Common-School Music, 
Physical Culture, Domestic Science, Manual Arts. Teacher 
near Stone Mountain, Ga., one year. Since 1910 teacher in 
Livingstone High School, Newton Co. Address Porterdale, 
Ga. 

Marguerite Forlaw, Athens, Clarke Co. English-French Diploma 
— Psychology and Pedagogy, English, Literature, Expression, 
History, Geography and Nature Study, Elementary Science 
(Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), Elementary Agriculture, 
Mathematics, Common-School Music, French. Teacher at 
Nashville, Ga., and Sylvania, Ga. Now stenographer in Alli- 
ens, Ga. 

Louisa Fambrough, Athens, Clarke Co. English Diploma — Psy- 
chology and Pedagogy, English, Literature, Expression, His- 
tory, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physiology, Physics), 



141 



Elementary Agriculture, Geography and Nature Study, Math- 
ematics, Common-School Music. Now Mrs. Ike Atkinson, 
Augusta, Ga. 

Rosa Leigh Fletcher, Forsyth, Monroe Co. Elective Diploma— - 
English, Literature, Expression, Geography and Nature Stu- 
dy, Elementary Science (Physics, Chemistry, Physiology), 
Elementary Agriculture, Common-School Music, Psychology 
and Pedagogy, Domestic Science. Teaching at Toccoa, Ga. 

Nancy Jane Fletcher, Parrott, Terrell Co. Eng.-Lat.-Dom. Sc:-. 
Diploma — Psychology and Pedagogy, English, Literature, 
Expression, History, Geography and Nature Study, Element- 
ary Agriculture, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physiology, 
Physics), Mathematics, Common-School Music, Physical Cul- 
ture, Domestic Science, Manual Arts (2 years), Latin. 
Teaching in Poplar Springs School, Laurens Co. Address, 
Dublin, Ga., R. F. D. No. 4. 

L. Elise Gibbs, Madison, Morgan Co. Eng. -Latin Diploma — Psy- 
chology and Pedagogy, English, Literature, Expression, His- 
tory, Physical Culture, Geography and Nature Study, Ele- 
mentary Science (Chemistry, Physiology, Physics), Element- 
ary Agriculture, Mathematics, Common-School Music, Man- 
ual Arts, Latin. Teacher in Elementary School, S. N. S., 
two years. Teacher in Americus, Ga., schools. 

Kate Eloise Hicks, Reynolds, Macon Co. Eng.-Dom. Sci. Diploma 
— English, Psychology and Pedagogy, Literature, Expres- 
sion, History, Geography and Nature Study, Elementary Sci- 
ence (Chemistry, Physics, Physioloyg), Elementary Agricul- 
ture, Mathematics, Common-School Music, Physical Culture, 
Domestic Science. Assistant Department of Pedagogy, at 
S. N. S., two years. Now principal Muscogee Elementary 
School, S. N. S. 

Rubye Capal Hodge, Shady Dale, Jasper Co. English Diploma — 
Psychology and Pedagogy, English, Literature, Expression, 
History, Geography and Nature Study, Elementary Science 
(Physics, Chemistry, Physiology), Elementary Agriculture, 
Mathematics, Common-School Music, Manual Arts (2 years). 
Teacher in Shady Dale School, 1910-'ll. 

Ophelia Hollingsworth, Pelham, Mitchell Co. Eng.-French-Ddm. 
Sci. Diploma — Psychology and Pedagogy, English, Literature, 
Expression, History, Geography and Nature Study, Element- 
ary Science (Physics, Physiology, Chemistry), Elementary 



142 



Agriculture, Mathematics, Common-School Music, Physical 
Culture, Domestic Science, French. Teacher at Barney, Ga. 

Mary Elizabeth Holcomb, Atlanta, Fulton Co. Elective Diploma — 
Literature, Expression, Elementary Agriculture, Common 
School Music, Physical Culture, Psychology and Pedagogy, 
Latin, French. Teaching in Atlanta City Schools. Address, 
431 Central Ave. 

Delia Reese Bailsman, Madison, Morgan Co. Elective Diploma — 
Psychology and Pedagogy, Expression, Geography an 1 Nature 
Study, Elementary Science (Physiology, Chemistry, Physics), 
Elementary Agriculture, Manual Arts (2 years), Common- 
School Music, Physical Culture. Teacher near Madison, Ga. 
Teacher in Newton County Schools. 

Margaret Melissa Heard, Elberton, Elbert Co. Elective Diploma — 
English, Expression, Geography and Nature Study, Element- 
ary Science (Physiology, Chemistry, Physics), Elementary 
Agriculture, Common-School Music, Psychology and Peda- 
gogy, Manual Arts (2 years), French, German, Physical Cul- 
ture. Teaching in the Florida Normal Institute, Madison, 
Fla. 

Harriette Siler Kinnebrew, Athens, Clarke Co. Eng.-Lat.-French- 
Man'l Arts-Dom. Sci. Diploma — Psychology and Pedagogy, 
English, Literature, Expression, History, Geography and 
Nature Study, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, Phy- 
siology, Elementary Agriculture, Mathematics, Common- 
School Music, Physical Culture, Domestic Science, Manual 
Arts, Latin, French. Teacher at Winder, Ga., one year. Now 
teaching at Ashburn, Ga. 

Anne Elizabeth Lane, Lockhart, Lincoln Co. Eng.-Man'l Arts- 
Dom. Science Diploma — Psychology and Pedagogy, English, 
Literature, Expression, History, Geography and Nature Stu- 
dy, Elementary Science (Physiology, Chemistry, Physics), 
Mathematics, Physical Culture, Domestic Science, Manual 
Arts, Elementary Agriculture, Common-School Music. Teach- 
ing at Boston, Ga. 

Mamie Irene McRee, Watkinsville, Oconee Co. English Diploma — 
Psychology and Pedagogy, English, Literature, Expression, 
History, Geography and Nature Study, Elementary Science 
(Physiology, Chemistry, Physics), Elementary Agriculture, 
Mathematics, Common-School Music, Physical Culture. 
Teaching at Stone Mountain. Ga. 



143 



Evelyn Maxwell, Elberton, Elbert Co. Elective Diploma — Psy- 
chology and Pedagogy, English, Expression, Geography and 
Nature Study, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, Phys- 
iology), Common-School Music, Domestic Science, Physical 
Culture, Elementary Agriculture. Teacher at Gainesville, 
Ga. Now Mrs. Roy Long, Carlton, Ga. 

Pattie Lorine Meiere, Arnoldsville, Oglethorpe Co. Eng. -Domestic 
Science Diploma — Psychology and Pedagogy, English, Litera- 
ture, Expression, History, Mathematics, Domestic Science, 
Geography and Nature Study. Elementary Science (Physiol- 
ogy, Chemistry, Physics), Common-School Music, Physical 
Culture, Elementary Agriculture. Teaching in Hancock Co. 

Lucy Lorena Martin, Hilton, Early Co. Eng.-German-Man'l Arts- 
Dom. Science Diploma — Psychology and Pedagogy, English, 
Literature, Expression, History, Geography and Nature Study, 
Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), Ele- 
mentary Agriculture, Mathematics, Common-School Music, 
Manual Arts, Domestic Science, Physical Culture, German. 
Teacher near Hilton, Ga. Teacher at Colomokee, Ga. 

Elizabeth Milligan, Rayle, Wilkes Co. Elective Diploma — Psy- 
chology and Pedagogy, Expression, Elementary Agriculture, 
Common School Music, Manual Arts (2 years), Domestic 
Science, Physical Culture. Teacher at Rayle, Ga., one year. 

Teacher at Watkinsville, Ga., one year. Now teaching at Ask- 
burn, Ga. 

Ella Clifford Oliver, Augusta, Richmond Co. Elective Diploma — 
Psychology and Pedagogy, Literature, Expression, Element- 
ary Science (Physiology, Chemistry, Physics), Elementary 
Agriculture, Common-School Music, Physical Culture, Man- 
ual Arts (2 years). Teacher two years in Lincoln County 
schools. Address, Lincolnton, Ga., Eoute 2. 

Erna Elizabeth Proctor, Jacksonville, Fla. Elective Diploma 

Psychology and Pedagogy, Expression, Geography and Na- 
ture Study, Elementary Agriculture, Common-School Music, 
Physical Culture, Domestic Science, Manual Arts (2 years). 
Address 220 E. Sixth St., Jacksonville, Fla. 

Julia Reid Pierce, Smith's Station, Ala. Eng.-Latin-Dom. Science- 
Manual Arts Diploma — Psychology and Pedagogy, English, 
Literature, Expression, History, Geography and Nature Stu- 
dy, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, Physiology),, 



144 



Elementary Agriculture, Mathematics, Common-School Music, 
Physical Culture, Domestic Science, Manual Arts, Latin. 
Teaching at Chula, Ga. 

Hermie Stella Powell, Lincolnton, Lincoln Co. English Diploma — 
English, Literature, Expression, History, Geography and Na- 
ture Study, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Physics, 
Chemistry, Physiology), Elementary Agriculture, Common- 
School Music, Physical Culture, Psychology and Pedagogy. 
Teacher at Pelham, Ga., one year. Teacher at Buena Vista, 
Ga. 

Mary Madeline Quillian, Athens, Clarke Co. English-Dom. Science 
Diploma — Psychology and Pedagogy, English, Literature, Ex- 
pression, History, Geography and Nature Study, Elementary 
Science (Chemistry, Physiology, Physics), Elementary Agri- 
culture, Mathematics, Common-School Music, Domestic Sci- 
ence. Teacher Tallulah Falls Industrial School one year. 

Edith Robertson, Dalton, Whitfield Co. English-German-Manual 
Arts-Dom. Science Diploma — Psychology and Pedagogy, Eng- 
lish, Literature, History, Expression, Elementary Agriculture, 
Manual Arts, Domestic Science, Elementary Science (Phys- 
iology, Chemistry, Physics), Physical Culture, Mathematics, 
Common-School Music, German, Geography and Nature Stu- 
dy. Teacher at Dalton, Ga. 

Annie Lou Jewel Slaton, Athens, Clarke Co. Elective Diploma — 
Psychology and Pedagogy, Expression, Geography and Nature 
Study, Elementary Agriculture, Common-School Music, Phys- 
ical Culture, Domestic Science, Manual Arts (2 years). 
Teacher at Murrayville, Ga., one year, at Mountville, Ga., one 
year. Present address, Murrayville, Ga. 

Agnes Cassie Simpson, Milledgeville, Baldwin Co. Elective Di- 
ploma — Psychology and Pedagogy, Literature, Expression, 
Elementary Agricultture, Mathematics, Physical Culture, 
Common-School Music, Latin. 

Vivia Vernelle Shockley, Apalachee, Morgan Co. English-Manual 
Arts-Dom. Science Diploma — Psychology and Pedagogy, Eng- 
lish, Literature, Expression, -History, Elementary Science 
(Physiology, Chemistry, Physics). .Mathematics, Elementary 
Agriculture, Common-School Music, Physical Culture, Do- 
mestic Science, .Manual Arts, Geography and Nature Study. 
Teaching at Apalachee. da. 



145 



Effie Estelle Whelchel, Athens, Clarke Co. English-Dom. Science 
Diploma — Psychology and Pedagogy, English, Literature, Ex- 
pression, History, Geography and Nature Study, Elementary 
Science (Chemistry, Physics, Physioloyg), Elementary Agri- 
culture, Mathematics, Common School Music, Domestic Sci- 
ence, Book-keeping. Teacher at Chickamauga, Ga. Teach- 
er at Ashburn, Ga. 

Birdie Johnson Wilkinson, Athens, Clarke Co. English-Latin- 
German-French-Dom. Science Diploma — Psychology and Ped- 
agogy, English, Literature, Expression, History, Geography 
and Nature Study, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, 
Physiology), Elementary Agriculture, Mathematics, Common 
School Music, Physical Culture, Domestic Science, French, 
German, Latin. Now Mrs. C. L. Gowan. 

Joe Williamson, Brunswick, Glynn Co. English-Man'l Arts-Dom. 
Science Diploma — Psychology and Pedagogy, English Litera- 
ture, Expression, History, Geography and Nature Study, Ele- 
mentary Science (Physiology, Chemistry, Physics), Element- 
ary Agriculture, Mathematics, Common-School Music, Phys- 
ical Culture, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teaching in 
Brunswick. 

Annie Wilde Walker, Cedartown, Polk Co. Elective Diploma — 
Psychology and Pedagogy, Literature, Expression, Element- 
ary Science (Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), Elementary 
Agriculture, Common-School Music, Physical Culture, Do- 
mestic Science, Manual Arts (2 years). Teaching at Mariet- 
ta, Ga. 

Mamie Louise Williams, Lawrenceville, Gwinnett Co. Elective 
Diploma — Psychology and Pedagogy, Expression, Elementary 
Science (Physiology, Chemistry, Physics), Elementary Agri- 
culture, Common-School Music, Domestic Science. Teacher 
at Lawrenceville, Ga. 

Elizabeth Young, Cedartown, Polk Co. Elective Diploma — Psy- 
chology and Pedagogy, English, Expression, Elementary Sci- 
ence (Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), Elementary Agricul- 
ture, Common-School Music, Physical Culture, Domestic Sci- 
ence. Teacher at Watkinsville, Ga. Now teaching in Ele- 
mentary School, S. N. S. 

Certificates Issued May 31, 1909. 

Martha Foster, Lithonia, DeKalb Co. Certificate — Literature, 
English, Expression, History, Geography and Nature Study, 



146 



Elementary Science, Elementary Agriculture, Mathematics, 
Common-School Music. 

Eunice Newton, LaGrange, Troup Co. Certificate — English, Lit- 
erature, Expression, History, Geography and Nature Study, 
Elementary Agriculture, Physical Culture, Latin, French. 

Addie Young, Newnan, Coweta Co. Certificate — English, Litera- 
ture, Expression, History, Geography and Nature Study, Ele- 
mentary Science, Elementary Agriculture, Physical Culture, 
Manual Arts. Teacher in Nacoochee Institute. Now Mrs. 
P. P. Salter, Good Water, Ala. 

Lula Menecies Munday, Athens, Clarke Co. Certificate — Civics, 
English, Reading, Penmanship, Mathematics, Psychology and 
Pedagogy, Geography, and History. Teacher Athens City 
Schols. Now Mrs. John Henderson, Gray, Ga. 

Erna Proctor. Certificate — Instrumental Music. 

Rubye Hodge. Certificate — Instrumental Music. 

Mrs. J. P. Sharp, Baconton. Manual Arts. 

Rose Moran, Atlanta, Fulton Co. Manual Arts. 

Diplomas Granted May 30, 1910. 

Crawford E. Aiken, Newborn, Morgan Co. English, Mathematics, 
Geography and Nature Study, Elementary Agriculture, Com- 
mon-School Music, History, Expression, Literature, Science 
(Physics and Chemistry), Psychology and Pedagogy, Bible 
Study. Principal West Point Public Schools. Address, West 
Point, Ga. 

Mary Bradley, Savannah, Chatham Co. English, Expression, Lit- 
erature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Phys- 
iology, Physic), Physical Culture, History, Geography, Na- 
ture Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common- 
School Music, French, Manual Arts, Bible Study. Taught 
one year in Savannah Public Schools. Not teaching now. 
Address, 210 Duffy St. E., Savannah, Ga. 

Frances Blackwell, Shady Dale, Morgan Co. English, Expression, 
Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, 
Physics, Physiology), History, Geography and Nature Study, 
Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School Mu- 
sic, Physical Culture, Domestic Science. Teaching in country 
school, Morgan County. 



147 



B. T. Beasley, Blitch, Bulloch Co. English, Expression, Litera- 
ture, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physiol- 
ogy), History, Geography and Nature Study, Agriculture, 
Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School Music, Physical 
Culture, Bible Study. Student of Medicine in Atlanta. Pres- 
ent address: Atlanta College of Physicians and Surgeons. 
H6me address: Statesboro, Ga. 

Nell Carlton, Monroe, Morgan Co. English, Expression, Litera- 
ture, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, 
Physiology), History, Psychology and Pedagogy, Agriculture, 
Physical Culture, Common-School Music, Geography and Na- 
ture Study, Latin, Domestic Science, Manual Arts, Bible 
Study. Teaching in Perry-Rainey Institute, Auburn, Ga. 

Pearl Covington, Cartersville, Bartow Co. English, Expression, 
Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, 
Physiology, Physics), Psychology and Pedagogy, Agriculture, 
Geography and Nature Study, Physical Culture, Common- 
School Music, Manual Arts, Domestic Science, Bible Study. 
Teaching in Bartow County, county school. 

Pattie Elder, Farmington, Oconee Co. English, Expression, Liter- 
ature, History, Mathematics, Psychology and Pedagogy, Ele- 
mentary Science (Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), Agricul- 
ture, Common-School Music, Physical Culture, Geography 
and Nature Study, Latin, Bible Study. Taught one year in 
Winder, Ga. Now teaching in Marietta Public School. Pres- 
ent address, 305 Lawrence St., Marietta, Ga. 

Edgar A. Evans, Jakin, Early Co. English, Expression, Litera- 
ture, Mathematics, History, Agriculture, Psychology and Ped- 
agogy, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), 
Geography and Nature Study, Common-School Music, Physi- 
cal Culture, Manual Arts, Latin. Teacher at Chipley, Ga., 
one year. Now principal Nelson Public School, Nelson, Ga. 

Mattilu Fincher, Culloden, Monroe Co. English, Expression, Lit- 
erature, History, Mathematics, Psychology and Pedagogy, El- 
ementary Science (Chemistry, Physiology, Physics), Geogra- 
phy and Nature Study, Common-School Music, Agriculture, 
Physical Culture, Bible Study, Manual Arts. Teaching in At- 
lanta schools. Present address, 69 Luckie St., Atlanta, Ga. 

Robert Franklin Freeman, Preston, Webster Co. English, Ex- 
pression, Literature, History, Psychology and Pedagogy, Ag- 
riculture, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry,, 



148 



Physics, Physiology), Common-School Music, Physical Cul- 
ture, Geography and Nature Study. Student University of 
Georgia one year. Now principal of Weston High School. 
Will return to University of Georgia next year. Present ad- 
dress, Weston, Ga. 

Bertha Garland, Toccoa, Stephens Co. English, Expression, Lit- 
erature, History* Mathematics, Agriculture, Psychology and 
Pedagogy, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, Physiol- 
ogy), Common-School. Music, Geography and Nature Study, 
Physical Culture, Manual Arts, Domestic Science, Bible Study, 
Latin. Taught one year in Toccoa, Ga. Now married. Pres- 
ent address, Mrs. R. M. Whitmire, Vienna, Ga. 

Fannie Lou Garrard, Washington, Wilkes Co. English, Expres- 
sion, Literature, Mathematics, History, Agriculture, Element- 
ary Science (Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), Psychology 
and Pedagogy, Geography and Nature Study, Common-School 
Music, Manual Arts, Physical Culture. Teacher in Athens 
Schools. 

Margaret Clyde Hogg, LaGrange, Troup Co. English, Expression, 
Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, 
Physics, Physiology), History, Geography and Nature Study, 
Psychology and Pedagogy, Agriculture, Common-School Mu- 
sci, Physical Culture, Latin, Manual Arts, Domestic Science, 
Bible Study. Taught one year in Stephens County schools. 
Now teaching at Bellton School, Lula, Ga. Present address, 
Lula, Ga. 

Annie Houze, Roswell, Milton Co. English, Expression, Literature, 
History, Mathematics, Agriculture, Elementary Science 
(Chemistry, Physiology, Physics), Psychology and Pedagogy, 
Geography and Nature Study, Common-School Music, Physi- 
cal Culture, Manual Arts, Domestic Science, Bible Study. 
Principal of Cross Roads School in Fulton County. Present 
address, Dunwoody, Ga. 

Margaret Hogan, Atlanta, Fulton Co. English, Expression, Liter- 
ature, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), 
Mathematics, History, Geography and Nature Study, Agricul- 
ture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School Music, Phy- 
sical Culture, Latin, Domestic -Science. Teaching at Center 
Hill School, Fulton County. 

John Quitman Harvey, Jakin, Early Co. English, Expression, 
Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, 



149 



Physics, Physiology), History, Geography and Nature Study, 
Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School Mu- 
sic, Physical Culture, Latin, Bible Study. Principal of Har- 
mony High School. Address, Colquitt, Ga. 

Annie Kate Johnson, Box Springs, Chattahoochee Co. English, 
Expression, Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science 
(Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), History, Geography and 
Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Com- 
mon-School Music, Physical Culture, Domestic Science. 
Teaching at Favoraville, Ga. Present address, Box Springs, 
Ga. 

W. H. Key, Monticello, Jasper Co. English, Expression, Litera- 
ture, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, 
Physiology), History, Geography and Nature Study, Agricul- 
ture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School Music, Lat- 
in, Manual Arts, Bible Study. Later student in the Univer- 
sity of Georgia. Now in real estate business in Graham, Ga. 
Mayor of Graham. Present address: Graham, Ga. 

Linie Elizabeth Killebrew, Hartsfield, Colquitt Co. English, 
Expression, Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science 
(Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), History, Geography and 
Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Com- 
mon-School Music, Physical Culture, Latin, Domestic Science, 
Manual Arts, Bible Study. Teacher in Sparta schools one 
year. Now primary teacher in Hartsfield School. Address, 
Hartsfield, Ga. 

Minnie Louise Maughon, Monroe, Walton Co. English, Expres- 
sion, Ltierature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemis- 
try, Physics, Physiology), History, Geography and Nature 
Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common- 
School Music, Physical Culture, Latin, Domestic Science. 
Taught one year in Porsythe County schools. Now teaching 
in Bostwick High School, Bostwick, Ga. 

Etta May Matthews, Carlton, Madison Co. English, Expression, 
Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, 
Physics, Physiology), History, Geography and Nature Study, 
Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School Mu- 
sic, Physical Culture, Latin, Manual Arts. Taught one year 
atTemple, Ga. Now teaching in Benedict Memorial School, 
Cedartown, Ga. 

Frances Edith Newsome, Union Point, Greene Co, English, Ex- 
pression, Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science 

150 



(Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), History, Geography and 
Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Com- 
mon-School Music, Physical Culture, Domestic Science, Bbiie 
Study. Taught one year at Siloam, Ga. Now teaching in Un- 
ion Point High School. 

Daisy Neel, Boston, Thomas Co. English, Expression, Literature, 
Mathematics, Elementary Science ( Chemistry, Physics, Physi- 
ology), History, Geography and Nature Study, Agriculture, 
Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School Music, Physical 
Culture, French, Manual Arts, Bible Study. Teaching now 
at Maxim, Lincoln County, Ga. 

Grace Louvenia Pittman, Athens, Clarke Co. Engiish, Expres- 
sion, Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemis- 
try, Physics, Physiology), History, Geography and Nature 
Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common- 
School Music, Physical Culture, Domestic Science, Manual 
Arts. Taught in Clarke County schools. Teaching in Key 
West, Fla. 

Lucile Pope, Columbus, Muscogee Co. English, Expression, Lit- 
erature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, 
Physics, Physiology), History, Geography and Nature Study, 
Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Physical Culture, 
Common-School Music, Latin, Domestic Science, Manual Arts, 
Bible Study. Teaching at Barwick, Ga., country school. 

Walton Parker, Savannah, Chatham Co. English, Expression, Lit- 
erature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, 
Physics, Physiology), History, Agriculture, Geography and 
Nature Study, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School 
Music, Physical Culture, Latin, Greek, Domestic Science, Bi- 
ble Study. Taught one year at Montieth, Ga. Now teaching 
in Massie School, Savannah, Ga. Present address, 203 W. 
Perry St., Savannah. 

Miss Lily Reynolds, Lithia Springs, Douglas Co. Psychology and 
Pedagogy, English, Literature, Expression, History, Geogra- 
phy and Nature Study, Elementary Science (Physiology, 
Chemistry, Physics), I'.otany, Entomology and Elementary 
Agriculture, Mathematics, Common-School Music, Bible Stu- 
dy, Manual Arts, Domestic Science, Physical Culture. State 
Normal School Faculty, Extension Worker in Douglas County. 

Ludie Simpson, Norcross, Gwinnett Co. English, Expression, Lit- 
erature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Phys- 



151 



iology, Physics), History, Geography and Nature Study, Agri- 
culture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School Music, 
Physical Culture, Latin, Greek, Domestic Science, Bible Study. 
Taught one year at Logansville, Ga. Now teaching at Senoia, 
Ga. 

Hattie Ruth Sanders, Gordon, Twiggs Co. English, Expression, 
Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, 
Physics, Physiology), History, Geography and Nature Study, 
Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School Mu- 
sic, Physical Culture, Domestic Science, Manual Arts, Bible 
Study. Teaching in Warrenton High School one year. Now 
teacher at Adel, Ga. 

Annie Sale, Tignall, Wilkes Co. English, Expression, Literature, 
Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, Phys- 
iology), History, Geography and Nature Study, Agriculture, 
Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School Music, Physical 
Culture, Domestic Science, Manual Arts, Bible Study. Teach- 
ing at Goshen, Ga., country school. Present address: Lin- 
colnton, Ga., Route No. 1. 

L. V. Tyler, Ocilla, Irwin Co. English, Expression, Literature, 
Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, Phys- 
iology), History, Geography and Nature Study, Agriculture, 
Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School Music, Latin, 
Manual Arts, Bible Study. Principal of Sparta schools one 
year. Now principal of Gordon High School. 

Martha Marie Wynn, Brown's Crossing, Baldwin Co. English, Ex- 
pression, Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science 
(Chemistry, Physiology, Physics), History, Geography and 
Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Com- 
mon-School Music, Physical Culture, Bible Study, Domestic 
Science. Taught one year at Scottsboro, Ga. Now Mrs. W. 
G. Lockhart. Present address, Milledgeville, Route No. 1. 

Henry Gibbs Wiley, Eastanollee, Stephens Co. English, Expres- 
sion, Literature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemis- 
try, Physics, Physiology), History, Geography and Nature 
Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common- 
School Music, Physical Culture, Bible Study. Teaching at 
Arnoldsville, Ga. 

Emma Watkins, Talbotton, Talbot Co. English, Expression, Lit- 
erature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Phys- 
ics, Physiology), History, Geography and Nature Study, Agri- 



152 



culture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School Music, 
Physical Culture, Bible Study. Teaching at Barwick, Ga., 
country school. 

Gladys White, Grantviile, Coweta Co. English, Expression, Lit- 
erature, Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Phys- 
ics, Physiology), History, Geography and Nature Study, Agri- 
culture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School Music. 
Bible Study. Taught at Tallulah Falls and at Grantviile, Ga. 
Now Mrs. S. T. Lambert, Grantviile, Ga. 

Sara M. Webb, Athens, Clarke Co. English, Expression, Litera- 
ture , Mathematics, Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, 
Physiology), History, Geography and Nature Study, Agricul- 
ture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School Music, Latin. 
Teacher in Winterville High School one year. Now assistant 
in Psychology and Pedagogy, State Normal School, Athens, 
Ga. Present address, 595 Waddell St., Athens. 

Elective Diplomas. 

Emma Binns, College Park, Fulton Co. Elementary Science 
(Physics, Chemistry, Physiology), Nature Study, Agriculture, 
Psychology and Pedagogy, Common-School Music, Physical 
Culture, French, Manual Arts, Bible Study, Mathematics. 
Taught at Watkinsville High School one year. Now teaching 
in Atlanta schools. 

Sadie Friedlander Berg, Cordele, Crisp Co. English, Expression, 
Literature, Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Ped- 
agogy, Common-School Music, Physical Culture, French, Ger- 
man. Teacher in Rose Hill School, Columbus, Ga. 

Corinne Gerdine, Athens, Clarke Co. Elementary Science (Chem- 
istry, Physics, Physiology), Nature Study, Agriculture, Psy- 
chology and Pedagogy, French, Domestic Science, Manual 
Arts. Taught in Marietta, Ga., schools one year. Teaching 
now in Matteawan Schools, New York. 

Mary Buchanan Harper, Elberton, Elbert Co. Expression, Litera- 
ture, Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, 
Physical Culture, Domestic Science, Manual Arts. Taught in 
Muscogee Elementary School, State Normal School, one year. 
Now teaching in Americus, Ga.* 

Evelyn John Lane, Monticello, Jasper Co. English, Expression, 
Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), Nature 



153 



Study, Manual Arts, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, 
Common-School Music, Physical Culture, Domestic Science, 
Bible Study. Teaching in the Monticello schools. 

Leda Estelle Slaton, Hamilton, Harris Co. English, Expression, 
Elementary Science (Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), Nature 
Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy, Common- 
School Music, Physical Culture, Domestic Science, Manual 
Arts, Bible Study. Taught at Mountville, Ga., country school, 
one year. Now teaching at Lavonia, Ga. 

Elma Tribble, Forsyth, Monroe Co. Brief-Course Professional 
Diploma. English, Expression, Mathematics, Elementary 
Science (Chemistry, Physics, Physiology), Agriculture, Geo- 
graphy and Nature Study, Common-School Music, Physical 
Culture, Latin, French, Domestic Science, Bible Study. 
Teaching at Soperton, Ga., country school. 

Diplomas Granted May 29, 1911. 

Sarah Amason, Rayle, Wilkes Co. English-Manual Arts-Domestic 
Science Diploma. English, History, Mathematics, Literature, 
Elementary Science, Geography and Nature Study, Agricul 
ture, Psychology and Pedagogy and Practical Teaching, Ex- 
pression, Manual Arts, Domestic Science, Common-School 
Music, Bible Study, Physical Culture. Teacher in country 
school near Americus, Ga. 

Mary Armstrong, Chipley, Harris Co. English-Latin-Domestic Sci- 
ence Dilpoma — English, Mathematics, History, Literature, El- 
ementary Science, Physical Culture, Geography and Nature 
Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy and Practice 
Teaching, Domestic Science, Latin, Common-School Music, 
Bible Study. Teacher at Cataula, Ga. 

Hettie Paulette Allen, Monticello, Jasper Co. English-Domestic 
Science Diploma — English, Mathematics, History, Literature, 
Elementary Science, Geography and Nature Study, Agricul- 
ture, Psychology and Pedagogy and Practical Teaching, Ex- 
pression, Domestic Science, Bible Study, Physical Culture. 
Teacher in Union Schools, Rockdale County. 

Bertha Allen, Jersey, Walton Co. English-Latin-Domestic Science 
Diploma — English, Mathematics, History, Literature, Ele- 
mentary Science, Geography and Nature Study, Agriculture, 



154 



Psychology and Pedagogy and Practical Teaching, Expression, 
Domestic Science, Latin, Common-School Music, Bible Study, 
Physical Culture. Teacher at Bethlehem, Ga. 

Leola Eliza Allen, Monticello, Jasper Co. English-Domestic Sci- 
ence Diploma — English, Mathematics, History, Literature, 
Elementary Science, Geography and Nature Study, Agricul- 
ture, Psychology and Pedagogy and Practical Teaching, Ex- 
pression, Domestic Science, Common-School Music, Bible Stu- 
dy, Physical Culture. Teacher in Academy for the Deaf, 
Cave Spring, Ga. 

Mary Elizabeth Aiken, Newborn, Morgan Co. English-Manual 
Arts-Domestic Science-German Diploma — English, Mathemat- 
ics, History, Literature, Elementary Science, Geography and 
Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy and 
Practice Teaching, Expression, Manual Arts, Domestic Sci- 
ence, Common-School Music, German, Physical Culture. 
Teacher in Morgan County schools. 

Annie Sue Arnold, Winterville, Clark Co. English-Latin-German- 
Manual Arts-Domestic Science Diploma — English, Mathemat- 
ics, History, Literature, Elementary Science, Bible Study, 
Physical Culture, Geography and Nature Study, Agriculture, 
Psychology and Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Expression, 
Manual Arts, Domestic Science, Latin, German, Common- 
School Music. Teacher in Benedict School, Cedartown, Ga. 

Lizzie Buchan, Hawkinsville, Pulaski Co. English-German-Manual 
Arts-Domestic Science Diploma — English, Mathematics, His- 
tory, Literature, Elementary Science, Geography and Nature 
Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy and Practice 
Teaching, Expression, Manual Arts, Domestic Science, Com- 
mon-School Music, German, Bible Study, Physical Culture. 

Lila Ragan Callaway, Rayle, Wilkes Co. English-Latin-Domestic 
Science Diploma — English, Mathematics, History, Literature, 
Elementary Science, Geography and Nature Study, Agricul- 
ture, Psychology and Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Ex- 
pression, Domestic Science, Latin, Common-School Music, Bi- 
ble Study, Physical Culture. Teacher in Americus, Ga., pub- 
lic schools. 

Margaret H. Callaway, Americus, Sumter Co. English-Latin Di- 
ploma — English, Mathematics, History, Literature, Element- 
ary Science, Geography and Nature Study, Agriculture, Psy- 
chology and Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Expression, 



155 



Common-School Music, Bible Study, Physical Culture. Teach- 
er in Bethsaida School, Laurens Co. Address, Dublin, R. F. D. 

Lehman Chapman, Lithonia, DeKalb Co. English-Latin-Domestic 
Science Diploma — English, Mathematics, History, Literature, 
Elementary Science, Physical Culture, Geography and Nature 
Study, Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy and Practice 
Teaching, Expression, Domestic Science, Latin, Common- 
School Music, Bible Study. Teacher at Draketown, Ga. 

Louise Alice Dorough, Atlanta, Pulton Co. English-Domestic Sci- 
ence Diploma — English, Mathematics, Literature, History, 
Elementary Science, Geography and Nature Study, Agricul- 
ture, Psychology and Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Ex- 
pression, Domestic Science, Common-School Music, Physical 
Culture. Teacher in Fulton County schools. Address 111 N. 
Jackson St., Atlanta. 

Martha Louise Downer, Athens, Clarke Co. English-Domestic Sci- 
ence Diploma — English, Mathematics, History, Literature, El- 
ementary Science, Geography and Nature Study, Agriculture, 
Psychology and Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Expression, 
Domestic Science, Common-School Music, and Physical Cul- 
ture. Teaching, Hull, Ga. 

Virginia Dillard, Arnoldsville, Oglethorpe Co. English-Manual 
Arts Diploma — English, Mathematics, History, Literature, 
Elementary Science, Geography and Nature Study, Agricul- 
ture, Psychology and Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Ex- 
pression, Manual Arts, Bible Study, Physical Culture. Teach- 
er one-half year at Carlton, Ga. 

Kate Floyd, LaGrange, Troup Co. English-Latin-Domestic Science 
Diploma — English, Mathematics, History, Literature, Ele- 
mentary Science, Geography and Nature Study, Agriculture, 
Psychology and Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Expression, 
Domestic Science, Latin, Common-School Music, Bible Study, 
Physical Culture. Teacher in the Vashti School, Thomasville, 
Ga. 

Ada Fay Guill, Sparta, Hancock Co. English-Domestic Science- 
Manual Arts Diploma — English, Mathematics, History, Litera- 
ture, Elementary Sicence, Nature Study and Geography, Agri- 
culture, Psychology, Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Expres- 
sion, Domestic Science, Manual Arts, Common-School Music, 
Bible Study, Physical Culture. Teacher at Sandy Cross, Ga. 



156 



Sadie Merle Greer, Mansfield, Newton Co. English-French-Ger- 
man-Domestic Science Diploma — English, French, German, 
Mathematics, History, Literature, Elementary Science, Geog- 
raphy and Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology, Pedagogy 
and Practice Teaching, Expression, Domestic Science, Com- 
mon-School Music, Bible Study, Physical Culture. Teacher at 
Mansfield, Ga. 

Bertha May Hancock, Winterville, Clarke Co. English-Manual 
Arts Diploma — English, Mathematics, History, Literature, El- 
ementary Science, Geography and Nature Study, Agriculture, 
Psychology and Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Expression, 
Manual Arts, Bible Study, Physical Culture. Teacher in 
Clarke County schools. 

Mamie Viola Ivey, Lincolnton, Lincoln Co. English Diploma — 
English, Mathematics, History, Literature, Elementary Sci- 
ence, Geography and Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology 
and Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Expression, Bible Stu- 
dy, Physical Culture. Teacher at Meriwether, Ga. 

Annie Lou Jackson, Winder, Jackson Co. English-Domestic Sci- 
ence Diploma — English, Mathematics, History, Literature, 
Elementary Science, Geography and Nature Study. Agricul- 
ture, Psychology and Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Ex- 
pression, Domestic Science, Common-School Music, Physical 
Culture. Teacher at Winder, Ga. 

Maul L. King, Porterdale, Newton Co. English-German-Latin-Do- 
mestic Science Diploma — English, Mathematics, History, Lit- 
erature, Elementary Science, Geography and Nature Study, 
Agriculture, Psychology and Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, 
Expression, Domestic Science, Common-School Music, Ger- 
man, Bible Study, Latin. Teacher in Monticello, Ga. 

Ruth McKoy, Nevvnan, Coweta Co. English-Latin-Manual Arts Di- 
ploma — English, Mathematics, History, Literature, Element- 
ary Science, Geography and Nature Study, Psychology and 
Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Agriculture, Expression, 
Manual Arts, Latin, Common-School Music, Bible Study. 
Teacher in Toccoa, Ga. 

Seaborn S. McGarity, Temple, Paulding Co. English Diploma — 
English, .Mathematics, History, Literature, Elementary Sci- 
ence, Geography and Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology 
and Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Expression, Common- 
School Music. Principal Of school at Amity, Lincoln Co., Ga. 



157 



Joseph A. McGarity, Temple, Paulding Co. English Diploma- 
English, Mathematics, History, Literature, Elementary 
Science, Geography and Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychol- 
ogy and Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Expression, Com- 
mon-School Music, Bible Study. Principal Gilgal School, 
Ogeechee, Ga. 

Eldona Oliver, Bogart, Oconee Co. English-Manual Arts-Domestic 
Science Diploma — English, Mathematics, History, Literature, 
Elementary Science, Geography and Nature Study, Agricul- 
ture, Psychology, Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Expres- 
sion, Manual Arts, Domestic Science, Bible Study. Teacher at 
Toccoa, Ga. 

Frances Kathleen Powell, Athens, Clarke Co. English-Domestic 
Science Diploma — English, Mathematics, History, Literature, 
Elementary Science, Geography and Nature Study, Psycholo- 
gy, Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Expression, Domestic 
Science, Common-School Music, Agriculture. Teacher at 
Statham, Ga. 

Emma Yokum Pollard, Savannah, Chatham Co. English-Domestic 
Science Diploma — English, Mathematics, History, Literature, 
Elementary Science, Geography and Nature Study, Agricul- 
ture, Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Psychology, Expres- 
sion, Domestic Science, Common-School Music, Bible Study. 
Student assistant State Normal School Library. 

Nelle Phillips, Springdale, Quitman Co. English-Domestic Science 
Diploma — English, Mathematics, History, Literature, Ele- 
mentary Science, Geography and Nature Study, Agriculture, 
Psychology, Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Expression, Do- 
mestic Science, Bible Study. 

Louette Rabun, Savannah, Chatham Co. English-Domestic Science- 
Manual Arts Diploma — English, Mathematics, History, Liter- 
ature, Elementary Science, Geography and Nature Study, Ag- 
riculture, Psychology, Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Ex- 
pression, Manual Arts, Domestic Science, Common-School 
Music, Bible Study. Teacher in Savannah Public Schools- 
Address, 503 W. 3 7th St., Savannah. 

Sarah Bertha Swann, Washington, Wilkes Co. English-Domestic 
Science Diploma — English, Mathematics, History, Literature, 
Elementary Science, Geography and Nature Study, Agricul- 
ture, Psychology, Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Expres- 
sion, Domestic Science, Common-School Music, Bible Study 
Teacher in Wilkes County schools. 



158 



Frances Leith Shannon, College Park, Fulton Co. English-Manual 
Arts-Domestic Science Diploma — English, Mathematics, His- 
tory, Literature, Elementary Science, Geography and Nature 
Study, Agriculture, Psychology, Pedagogy and Practice Teach- 
ing, Expression, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teacher at 
EastPoint, Ga. 

Mollie Snelling, Pinehurst, Dooly Co. English Diploma — English, 
Mathematics, History, Elementary Science, Geography and 
Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology, Pedagogy and Prac- 
tice Teaching, Expression, Common-School Music, Literature, 
Bible Study. Teacher at Pinehurst, Ga. 

John L. Taylor, Juniper, Marion Co. English Diploma — English, 
Mathematics, History, Literature, Elementary Science, Geog- 
raphy and Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology, Pedagogy 
and Practice Teaching, Expression, Common-School Music, 
Bible Study. Principal School at Durand, Ga. 

May Estes Tarver, Lincolnton, Lincoln Co. English-Domestic Sci- 
ence Diploma — English, Mathematics, History, Literature, El- 
ementary Science, Geography and Nature Study, Agriculture, 
Psychology, Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Expression, Do- 
mestic Science, Common-School Music, Bible Study. Teacher 
at McDonough, Ga. 

Eva Estelle Trimble, Oxford, Newton Co. English-Domestic Sci- 
ence Diploma — English, Mathematics, History, Literature, 
Elementary Science, Geography and Nature Study, Agricul- 
ture, Psychology, Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Expres- 
sion, Domestic Science, Common-School Music, Bible Study 
Teacher at Ben Hill, Ga. 

Curtis Daniel Vinson, Wellston, Houston Co. English-Latin-Man- 
ual Arts Diploma — English, Mathematics, History, Literature, 
Elementary Science, Geography and Nature Study, Agricul- 
ture, Psychology, Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Expres- 
sion, Manual Arts, Latin, Common-School Music, Bible Study, 
Book-keeping. Principal of Hiram High School, Hiram, Ga. 

Cornelia Williamson, Athens, Clarke Co. English-Domestic Sci- 
ence-Manual Arts Diploma — English, Mathematics, History, 
Literature, Elementary Science, Geography and Nature Stu- 
dy, Agriculture, Psychology, Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, 
Expression, Manual Arts, Domestic Science. Teacher at Lo- 
ganville, Ga. 



Moselle Wiggins, Columbus, Muscogee Co. English-Domestic Sci- 
ence-Manual Arts Diploma — English, Mathematics, History, 
Literature, Elementary Science, Geography and Nature Study,. 
Agriculture, Psychology, Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, 
Expression, Manual Arts, Domestic Science, Common-School 
Music, Bible Study. Teacher at Statham, Ga. 

Ruth Mary Wynne, Madison, Morgan Co. English-Latin-German- 
Domestic Science-Manual Arts Diploma — English, Mathemat- 
tics, History, Literature, Elementary Science, Geography and 
Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology, Pedagogy and Prac- 
tice Teaching, Expression, Manual Arts, Domestic Science,. 
Latin, German. Teacher in Griffin, Ga., schools. 

Electice Diplomas. 

Lucy Ayers, Lavonia, Franklin Co. Elective Diploma — Literature, 
Elementary Science, Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology, 
Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Expression, Domestic Sci- 
ence, Common-School Music, Physical Culture. Teacher at 
Danielsville, Ga. 

Clyde Britt, Lawrenceville, Gwinnett Co. Elective Diploma — Ele- 
mentary Science, Nature Study, Agriculture, Expression, Psy- 
chology, Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Domestic Science, 
Common-School Music, Bible Study, Physical Culture. Teach- 
er at Loganville, Ga. 

Lucy Bydia Broyles, Atlanta, Fulton Co. Elective Diploma — Ele- 
mentary Science, Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology, Ped- 
agogy and Practice Teaching, Expression, Domestic Science, 
Common-School Music, German, Bible Study, Physical Culture. 
Supernumerary in Atlanta City Schools. 

Essa Buchan, Hawkinsville, Pulaski Co. Elective Diploma — Ele- 
mentary Science, Nature Study, Agriculture, Bible Study, 
Physical Culture, Psychology, Pedagogy and Practice Teach- 
ing, Expression, Manual Arts, Domestic Science, Common- 
School Music, German. 

Margaret Melissa Barkaloo, Brunswick, Glynn Co. Elective Di- 
ploma — Literature, Elementary Science, Geography and Na- 
ture Study, Psychology, Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, 
Expression, Domestic Science, Common-School Music, Physi- 
cal Culture. Teacher at Chamblee, Ga. Now Mrs. Wilt' 
White, Atlanta, Ga. 



160 



Emily Bembry, Hawkinsville, Pulaski Co. Elective Diploma — El- 
ementary Science, Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology, 
Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Expression, Manual Arts ; 
Domestic Science, Common-School Music, Bible Study, Phy- 
sical Culture. 

Elsie Alma Cubbege, Sylvania, Screven Co. Elective Diploma — 
Literature, Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology, Pedagogy 
and Practice Teaching, Expression, Domestic Science, Com- 
mon-School Music, Bible Study, Physical Culture. Teacher 
in Saylvania Public Schools. 

Iris Callaway, Lexington, Oglethorpe Co. Elective Diploma — Lit- 
erature, Elementary Science, Nature Study, Agriculture, Psy- 
chology, Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Expression, Man- 
ual Arts, Common-School Music, Bible Study, Physical Cul- 
ture. Teacher in S. N. S. Eelementary School. 

Caroline Clements, Greenville, Meriwether Co. Elective Diploma 
— Elementary Science, Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychol- 
ogy, Pedagogy, Practice Teaching, Expression, Manual Arts, 
Mommon-School Music, Bible Study, Physical Culture. Teach- 
er in country school near Americus, Ga. 

Marjorie Buff Ford, Demorest, Habersham Co. Elective Diploma 
— English, Mathematics, History, Literature, Geography and 
Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology, Pedagogy and Prac- 
tice Teaching, Expression, Manual Arts, Domestic Science, 
Bible Study, Physical Culture. Teacher in S. N. S. Element- 
ary School. 

Bessie Louise Dunn, Cairo, Grady Co. Elective Diploma — Ele- 
mentary Science, Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology, 
Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Expression, Domestic Sci- 
ence, Common-School Music, Physical Culture, Bible Study. 
Assistant principal of Metcalfe High School, Metcalfe, Ga. 

Mittie May Harris, Chipley, Harris Co. Elective Diploma — Ele- 
mentary Science, Nature Study, Agriculture. Expression, Psy- 
chology, Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Domestic Science, 
Bible Study, Physical Culture. Teacher at Odessadale, Ga. 

Lillian .Mitchell, Columbus, Muscogee Co. Elective Diploma — 
Elementary Science, Nature Study, Agriculture. Psychology, 
Pedagogy and Practice Teaching, Expression, Manual Arts, 
Domestic Sicence, French, Bible Study. Teacher in Colum- 
bus City Schools. 



161 



Roberta Isabell Moorhead, Buckhead, Morgan Co. Elective Di- 
ploma—Literature, Elementary Science, Nature Study, Agri- 
culture, Psychology, Pedagogy, Practice Teaching, Expres- 
sion, Manual Arts, Common-School Music, Bible Study. 
Teacher at Mitchem's Academy, Morgan County. 

Mary Rutherford Mathis, Americus, Sumter Co. Elective Diplo- 
ma — Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology, Pedagogy, Prac- 
tice Teaching, Domestic Science, Common-School Music, 
German, Expression, Bible Study. Teacher in Americus, Ga. 

Mae Prickett, Grantville, Meriwether Co. Elective Diploma — Lit- 
erature, Elementary Science, Nature Study, Agriculture, Psy- 
chology, Pedagogy, Practice Teaching, Expression, Manual 
Arts, Common-School Music, Bible Study. Teacher at Ho- 
gansville, Ga. 

Sara Lucile Pittard, Winterville, Clarke Co. Elective Diploma — 
Elementary Science, Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology, 
Pedagogy, Practice Teaching, Expression, Manual Arts, Do- 
mestic Science, Latin, Common-School Music, Bible Study. 
Teacher at Toccoa, Ga. 

Hortense Reid, Zebulon, Pike Co. Elective Diploma — Literature, 
Elementary Science, Nature Study, Psychology, Pedagogy 
and Practice Teaching, Expression, Manual Arts, Domestic 
Science, Common-School Music. Now Mrs. Robert Bankston, 
Barnesville, Ga. 

Olivia Bell Reid, Madison, Morgan Co. Elective Diploma — Eng- 
lish, Literature, Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology, Ped- 
agogy, Practice Teaching, Domestic Science, Common-School 
Music, Expression. Teacher in Morgan County schools. 

Anna Mae Reynolds, Greensboro, Green Co. Elective Diploma — 
Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology, Pedagogy, Practice 
Teaching, Expression, Common-School Music. Teaching 
country school near McDonough. Address, McDonough, Ga., 
R. F. D. 

Helen Scarlett, Brunswick, Glynn Co. Elective Diploma — Eng- 
lish, Literature, Geography and Nature Study, Agriculture, 
Psychology, Pedagogy, Practice Teaching, Expression, Man- 
ual Arts, Domestic Science, Common-School Music, Bible 
Study. Teacher at Fancy Muff, near Brunswick, Ga. 

Lillian Gladys Scott, Moultrie, Colquitt Co. Elective Diploma — 
Elementary Science, Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology, 



162 



Pedagogy, Practice Teaching, Expression, Manual Arts, Do- 
mestic Science, Common-School Music, German, Bible Study. 
Not teaching. Address, Moultrie, Ga. 

Isabelle Ward Simpkins, Albany, Dougherty Co. Elective Diplo- 
ma — Mathematics, Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology, 
Pedagogy, Practice Teaching, Expression, Domestic Science, 
French. 

Mary Eunice Williams, Columbus, Muscogee Co. Elective Diplo- 
ma — Elementary Science, Nature Study, Agriculture, Psy- 
chology, Pedagogy, Practice Teaching, Expression, Domestic 
Science, French, Bible Study. Teacher at Newnan, Ga. 

Lena C. Walton, Washington, Wilkes Co. Elective Diploma — Ele- 
mentary Science, Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology, 
Pedagogy, Practice Teaching, Expression, Domestic Science, 
Common-School Music, Bible Study. Teaching near Buena 
Vista, Ga. 

Hennie Lucile Winter, Winterville, Clark Co. Elective Diploma — 
Elementary Science, Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology, 
Pedagogy, Practice Teaching, Expression, Domestic Science, 
Bible Study. Not teaching. 

Louise Hemingway, Perry, Houston Co. Elective Diploma — Eng- 
lish, Mathematics, History, Elementary Science, Geography 
and Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology, Pedagogy, Prac- 
tice Teaching, Expression, Latin, Common-School Music, Bi- 
ble Study, Physical Culture. Teacher Elementary School, 
S. N. S. 

Elizabeth Winburn, Atlanta, Fulton Co. English-Domestic Sci- 
ence Diploma — English, Mathematics, History, Elementary 
Science, Geography and Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychol- 
ogy, Pedagogy, Practice Teaching, Expression, Domestic Sci- 
ence, Common-School Music, Bible Study. Teacher at Bax- 
ley, Ga. 

Brief Course Pedagogy. 

Juanita Iiinson, Lumber City, Telfair Co. Brief Course Pedagogy 
Diploma — Elementary Science, Nature Study, Agriculture, 
Psychology, Pedagogy, .Manual "Arts, Domestic Science, Com- 
mon-School Music, Lible Study, Physical Culture. 

Hallie Maud Humphries, Sylvania, Screven Co. Brief Course Ped- 
agogy Diploma — English. Mathematics, History, Literature, 



163 



Elementary Science, Nature Study, Agriculture, Psychology, 
'Pedagogy, Manual Arts, Expression, Physical Culture. Teach- 
er at Stellaville, Ga. 

Mell Andrews, Grantville, Coweta Co. Brief Course Pedagogy Di- 
ploma — Literature, Elementary Science, Nature Study, Psy- 
chology, Pedagogy, Practice Teaching, Agriculture, Common- 
School Music, Expression. Teaching country school near Co- 
lumbus. 

Zora Carlton, Auburn, Gwinnett Co. Brief Course Pedagogy Diplo- 
ma — Elementary Science, Geography and Nature Study, Ag- 
riculture, Manual Arts, Psychology, Pedagogy, Common- 
School Music, Physical Culture. 

Estelle Poland, Griswoldville, Jones Co. Brief Course Pedagogy 
Diploma — Elementary Science, Nature Study, Agriculture, 
Psychology, Pedagogy, Expression, Common-School Music, 
German, Bible Study, Domestic Science. Student assistant 
Physical Culture, S. N. S. 

Annie Young Riley, Athens, Clarke Co. Brief Course Pedagogy 
Diploma — English, Mathematics, History, Literature, Ele- 
mentary Science, Geography and Nature Study, Agriculture, 
Psychology and Pedagogy, Expression, Domestic Science, 
Common-School Music. Not teaching. 

Minor Diploma. 

Cleophas Hicks, Riverdale, Clayton Co. Minor Diploma — English, 
Literature, Elementary Science, Nature Study, Agriculture, 
Expression, Common-School Music, Manual Arts, Bible Stu- 
dy, Physical Culture. 



164 



STATE NORMAL SGHOOL 

ATHENS, GEORGIA 



APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 



191 

Name in full Age._. 

Postoffice address , County 

Name of parent or guardian 

Address of parent or guardian 

Have you carefully read the entrance requirements? 

Have you been successfully vaccinated recently? 

What school have you recently attended? 

Do you hold a high school diploma ? 

Of what school? 

Have you a license to teach? What grade? 

How far advanced are you in the following studies? 

English Mathematics. .. 

Geography .- — History 

How long do you expect to remain at the Normal School? 

For what class do you think you are prepared ? 

Will you cheerfully abide by the rules and regulations of the school ?. 

On what day do you expect to reach Athens ? What hour ? . 

Over which railroad will you come? 



You cannot be admitted to the school unless you bring a letter from 
your physician stating that you have not been exposed to any conta- 
gious disease for the last 30 days. See Health Certificate Blank 
(next to the last page of the Catalogue). 

You must be successfully vaccinated. This can be done upon your 
arrival at the school. 

If you are a graduate or a student of any accredited high school, 
bring statement of your standing upon blank furnished by all accred- 
ited high school principals. If you have been a member of a high 
school not accredited, bring a written detailed statement of your schol- 
astic attainments, signed by the principal of such school. 

Read the Catalogue of this school and the above blank carefully; if 
you intend to become a student of tbis institution, fill out the blank 
fully and mail as early as possible to 

K. C. BRANSON, PRESIDENT 

Static Normai, School, 

Athens, Ga. 



A CANDID WORD WITH PARENTS 



Students get restless and homesick before the Christmas holidays 
begin, and again before the session ends. They write begging letters 
to their parents, asking permission to come home. The school in conse- 
quence suffers confusion and its work is seriously crippled thereby. A 
week or so of valuble time is practically lost out of the session every 
year for reasons like these. 

It has therefore become necessary to establish the following regu- 
lations : 

Students must not leave the school before the holidays begin, De- 
cember 20, or before the session ends, May 26, and fall term students 
must not re-enter tardily when the session is resumed upon January 2, 
without permission of the Dean, Mr. Alexander Rhodes. The student 
violating this rule will not be allowed to re-enter the school. 

The Dean will allow no variations or exceptions except for provi- 
dential reasons. When these reasons arise in the home, parents or 
guardians must communicate directly with the Dean by letter, tele- 
gram, or telephone. 

Please refer to the Dean all letters from students asking for varia- 
tions from these proper regulations. 

Except for providential reasons, you ought not to ask the Dean to 
set them aside. 



CALENDAR, 1913-14 



Sept. 9, Tuesday - 
Sept. 9, Tuesday - 
Sept. 10, Wednesday- 
Sept. 11, Thursday - 
Dec. 18, Thursday - 



Jan. 5, Monday 

Jan. 26 Feb. 2 

Apr. 17, Friday 

Jun. 5, Friday 

Jun. 5, Friday 

Jun. 6, Saturday 

Jun. 6, Saturday 

Jun. 7, Sunday 

Jun. 8, Monday 



1913. 

-School Dormitories open. 
-Classification of Students. 
■Classification of Students. 
-Fall Term begins at 9 A. M. 
-Christmas Holidays begin. 

1914. 
-Re-opening of School. 
-Mid-session examinations. 
-Founder's Day. 
-Annual Meeting of Board of Trustees at 

3:30 P. M. 
-Annual Concert at 8:30 P. M. 
-Alumni-ae Reunion at 12 Noon. 
-Faculty Reception to Alumni-ae at 6 P. M. 
-Commencement Sermon at 11 A. M. 
-Graduating Exercises at 8 P. M. 



New students may enter at any time during the year, but it is 
best for them to enter September 9, or January 5. 

Prospective students will need to apply well in advance of their 
coming in order to be sure of places in the dormitories. The School 
can accommodate only 400 boarding students at present. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



T. J. SHACKELFORD, Athens, Ga President. 

S. B. BROWN, Albany, Ga Vice-President. 

G. A. MELL, Athens, Ga Secretary and Treasurer. 

Members ex-officio. 

Governor Jos. M. Brown, Atlanta, Ga. 

State Superintendent of Schools, M. L. Brittain, Atlanta, Ga. 

Chancellor, University of Georgia, David C. Barrow,. .Athens, Ga. 

Members-at-large. 

Col. W. J. Morton, Athens, Ga. 

J. R. Hogan, Agnes, Ga. 

Members City of Athens. 

T. J. Shackelford, Athens, Ga. 

E. J. Bondurant, Athens, Ga. 

Members Representing Trustees of University of Georgia. 

Augustus 0. Bacon, Macon, Ga. 

Hamilton McWhorter, Athens, Ga. 

Byron B. Bower, Jr., Bainbridge, Ga. 

Members Representing Congressional Districts. 

First District, Joseph W. Smith, Manassas, Ga. 

Second District, S. B. Brown, Albany, Ga. 

Third District, J. M. Collum, Americus, Ga. 

Fourth District, A. A. Carson, Columbus, Ga. 

Fifth District, J. R. Smith, Atlanta, Ga. 

Sixth District, Dr. J. C. Beauchamp, Williamson, Ga. 

Seventh District, E. S. Griffeth, Buchanan, Ga. 

Eighth District, E. A. Copelan, Greensboro, Ga. 

Ninth District, L. M. Brand, Lawrenceville, Ga. 

Tenth District, Lawton B. Evans, Augusta, Ga. 

Eleventh District, Charles Lane, Helena, Ga. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 



Prudential — Brittain, Morton, Barrow, McWhorter, Bondurant. 

Salaries — Carson, Beauchamp, Brand, Hogan, Evans, Brown. 

Teachers and Course of Study — Collum, Barrow, Lane, Brittain, 
Bacon, Evans. 

Finance — Brand, Brown, Carson, Copelan, Bower, J. R. Smith. 

Grounds and Buildings — Bondurant, Barrow, Morton, J. W. Smith, 
Griffeth. 

The President of the Board of Trustees is a member of all Stand- 
ing Committees, and the President of the School is a consulting 
member of the same. 



FACULTY AND OFFICERS, 



DAVID C. BARROW, LL.D., Chancellor Ex-officio. 

Chancellor of the University of Georgia. 

JERE M. POUND, A. B., President. 

ALEXANDER RHODES, Dean. 

MISS FANNIE H. SCOTT, Registrar. 

MISS PANSY B. NEWTON, Stenographer. 

J. C. WARDLAW, A. M. 

Psychology and Pedagogy. 

Director of Elementary Training School. 

PETER F. BROWN, A. M. 
English. 

MRS. GERTRUDE A. ALEXANDER, A. M. 
Expression. Assistant in English. 

T. E. HOLLINGSWORTH, A. B. 
Mathematics. 

DAVID L. EARNEST, A. M., 
Elementary Science. 

EUGENE C. BRANSON, A. M., 
Rural Economics. 

MISS ROBERTA HODGSON, A. M., 
History. 

FREDERICK A. MERRILL, B. Sc, 
Geography and Nature Study. 

E. SCOTT SELL, B. S. A., 
Agriculture. 

MISS IDA A. YOUNG, L. I., 

Latin. 

MISS HELEN L. SPROUT, 

German and Greek. 

Director of Correspondence Department. 

JOSEPH LUSTRAT, Bach, es Lett., 
French and Spanish. 

6 



MISS EDNA M. RANDALL, 
Domestic Arts and Science. 

MISS ANNIE LINTON, 
Manual Arts. 

MISS LURA B. STRONG, 
Physical Education. 

MISS GERTRUDE ELIZABETH WOOD, 
Music. 

MISS SARA M. WEBB, 

Assistant in Department of Psychology and Pedagogy. 

MISS CHLOE LOYD, 
Assistant in Department of English. 

MISS ANNIE MATHEWS, 
Assistant in Department of Mathematics. 

MISS CHLOE E. ALLEN, 
Assistant in Department of Elementary Science. 

MISS JESSIE L. REDD, 
Assistant in Departments of History and Geography. 

ALEXANDER RHODES, 
Assistant in Department of Agriculture. 

MISS PARNA B. HILL, 

Assistant in Department of Domestic Arts and Science. 

MISS REBECCA STEWART, 

Assistant in Department of Domestic Arts and Science. 

MISS MAUDE C. TOWNSEND, A. B., 
Assistant in Department of Manual Arts. 

MISS TEXAS HENDERSON, 
Student-assistant in Department of Physical Culture. 

MISS BESSIE M. HARDY, 
Assistant in Department of Music. 

MRS. AGNES EBERHART, 
Assistant in Department of Music. 

MRS. BRUCE CARRIER, 
Assistant in Department of Music. 

MISS JULIA McARTHUR, 
Assistant in Department of Music. 

MRS. MARY LEE DAVIS. 
Assistant in Department of Music. 

7 



MISS KATE E. HICKS, 
Principal Elementary Training School. 

MISS MARJORIE FORD, 
Critic Teacher Seventh and Eighth Grades. 

MISS IRIS CALLAWAY, 
Critic Teacher Fifth and Sixth Grades. 

MISS ELIZABETH YOUNG, 
Critic Teacher Third and Fourth Grades. 

MISS MARY WOODS, 
Critic Teacher Second Grade. 

MISS IV AH MOYER, 
Critic Teacher First Grade. 

MISS LAURA ELDER, 
Teacher of Rural School. 

MISS AGNES GOSS, 
Librarian. 

MISS MARGARET M. GIBBS, 
Assistant Librarian. 

MISS NELLIE COLBERT, 
Matron Winnie Davis Hall. 

MISS KATE HICKS, 
Matron Senior Hall. 

MISS CHLOE ALLEN, 
Matron Bradwell Hall. 

MISS BESSIE M. HARDY, 
Matron Gilmer Hall. 

MISS EMMIE JONES, 
Bookkeeper. 

MISS WILLIE FAGAN, 
Y. W. C. A. Secretary. 

MRS. B. H. KINNEBREW, 
Housekeeper. 



FACULTY COMMITTEES, 1912-13. 



Library: Branson, Goss, Hicks, Merrill, Sprout, Brown, Hodgson. 

Calendar and Entertainments: Linton, Wood, Fagan, Alexander, 
Rhodes. 

Schedule: Alexander, Loyd, Wardlaw, Hollingsworth, Sell. 

Faculty Meetings: Earnest, Hollingsworth, Merrill, Hodgson, Lin- 
ton. 

Promotion and Publicity: Merrill, Alexander, Sell, Rhodes, Bran- 
son. 

Curriculum: Brown, Wardlaw, Hollingsworth, Young, Alexander. 

Publication: Merrill, Brown, Earnest, Sell, Branson. 

University Representative: Alexander, Brown, Loyd, Hicks, Ear- 
nest, Hodgson. 

School Organization: Wardlaw, Loyd, Wood, Sell, Earnest, Young, 

Fagan. 
Classification: Hollingsworth, Brown, Merrill, Wardlaw, Sell. 

Alumni-ae: Loyd, Hicks, Allen, Redd, Elizabeth Young, Mathews, 
Hill, Webb, Callaway, Ford. 

Welfare: Rhodes, Broadus, Fagan, Strong, Randall, Young, and 
Matrons. 

Grounds and Buildings: Rhodes, Sell, Linton. 

Employment: Earnest, Hicks, Wardlaw, Alexander, Scott. 



DIRECTIONS FOR REACHING ATHENS. 



Have all baggage plainly marked with your name and STATE 
NORMAL SCHOOL, ATHENS, GA. 

Arrange to reach Athens in the day time. If this is impossible, 
notify the Dean of the school of the exact time you will arrive and 
of the railroad over which you will come, that some one may meet 
you at night. 

The school is on the street car line, as are also the Seaboard, 
the Gainesville Midland and the Southern stations. It is a five 
minute walk from the Central or Georgia stations to the car line. 
The conductors on the street cars will gladly tell you how to reach 
the school. 

Do not give your baggage checks to anyone at the depot but a 
representative of the school, and never give them to a negro dray- 
man. A representative of the Normal will meet each train. 



10 



GENERAL CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION. 



The purpose of this school is to "educate and train teachers 
for the common schools of Georgia." The terms of admission are 
as follows: 

First: The applicant must be sufficiently mature and sufficient- 
ly well prepared to undertake the work of the school successfully. 
All students, when admitted, are considered upon probation for 
a reasonable length of time; and, when unwilling or unable to do 
the work required, they will be privately counseled to withdraw. 

Second: Good Moral Character. Every student will be re- 
quired to hand to the President a letter of recommendation from 
some responsible party in the home neighborhood. 

Third: Good Health. This school is delightfully situated in 
the Piedmont hills. The conditions of health here cannot be sur- 
passed. There are no neater, tidier school buildings or premises 
anywhere in the world; but the school is not a health resort, and 
the applicant who lacks the physical stamina necessary to pursue 
the course of study satisfactorily must not seek to enter. 

Fourth: No applicant will be admitted into the school who 
does not bring a letter from the home physician certifying that 
the applicant has not been exposed to any contagious diseases 
within the previous thirty days. See blank for this purpose, next 
to last page. This letter must be presented upon arrival. 

Fifth: Successful vaccination is also another absolutely nec- 
essary condition of entrance. All students upon arrival will have 
their arms examined by a physician; and, if they do not have a 
satisfactory scar, they must be vaccinated at once before they can 
be admitted into the school, (at a cost of fifty cents each). In all 
cases it is better for applicants to be vaccinated before coming 
here, provided it can be done with fresh, pure, vaccine points. 

These last two conditions are so imperative, and will be ad- 
hered to so rigidly, that the applicant who neglects them will be 
necessarily subjected to great trouble in entering the school. 
Plainly and emphatically, these things must not be neglected by 
any applicant. 

REGISTERING. 

Upon reaching the school, the student should go at once to the 
Registrar's office and fill out a registration blank properly. This 
blank is then taken to the Dormitory Manager's office, where a 

11 



Dormitory Room Ticket will be obtained. All moneys and fees 
should at once be paid at this office and receipts secured for same. 

The student should write her name upon her dormitory ticket 
and repair to the Matron of the dormitory to which assignment 
has been made for selection of room, room-mate, etc. The rooms 
in the Winnie Davis Memorial Hall are filled by appointees of 
the Chapters of the U. D. C. If a student is to occupy a room in 
the Winnie Davis, a letter of appointment must be in the hands 
of the President by August 15. 

When the student is settled in her room she should consult the 
classification committee of the class which she wishes to enter, 
for her class card. These classification committees will meet 
students in various class rooms for all assignments. The direct- 
ory of where these committees may be found is posted in con- 
spicious places in the corridors of the academic buildings. In 
order to be properly classified at once the student should bring 
letter of introduction, health certificate, and all reports from form- 
er schools and teachers. 

When the student has received her class assignment and has 
been given a class card, any of the former students of the school 
will assist in making out the schedule of daily recitations. Books 
used as texts in the different classes may be obtained from the 
Dormitory Manager at reduced prices. Class cards must be shown 
to teachers of the various classes upon reporting to classes so that 
class rolls may be made. Report to all classes promptly. 

Students are required to register promptly with all their teach- 
ers according to their class assignments and to settle down to 
work at once. Only the Classification Committees may change 
the class cards after once issued, and students must not vary 
therefrom without the permission of this committee. 



BOARDING DEPARTMENT. 

The school now has four dormitories: Gilmer Hall, Bradwell 
Hall, Winnie Davis Memorial Hall, and Senior Hall (the upper 
floor of the Dining Room Building). There is accommodation for 
four hundred students. All dormitories are steam-heated, with 
toilet rooms and baths on every floor abundantly supplied with 
hot and cold water. They are comfortable, pleasant, and healthful 
homes for the students. Students in each dormitory are under 
the care of a resident matron, who looks after their needs and 
comforts. The dining hall is one of the best in the state. 

Board in the dormitories includes room, table fare, heat, lights, 

12 



and attendants for the rougher work. The students wait upon 
themselves for the most part. 

Each student will pay for and look after her own laundering 
with the assistance of the matron in charge. 

Each student must bring a pillow, pillow-cases, bed clothes 
(including at least one white spread), towels, hair brush and 
comb, and other personal toilet articles; also a bath-robe, bed- 
room slippers, overshoes, wrap and umbrella, all of which are 
necessary for personal safety and well-being. 

The male students do not room in the dormitories. Rooms 
are rented for them near the campus and paid for by the school. 
Such students pay the same rate for board as outlined in the 
catalogue, furnishing bedding, etc., just as the girls do. 



WINNIE DAVIS MEMORIAL HALL. 

Students who wish to occupy rooms in the Winnie Davis Me- 
morial Hall must have letters assigning them these rooms by 
August 15. If these assignments are not made by this date, 
the school authorities will reserve the right to fill these rooms 
with other students. These letters of appointment can only be 
secured through the U. D. C. chapters that furnished the rooms. 
They must be properly signed by the President of the chapter, 
and mailed to the President of the School by August 15. 



THE INFIRMARY. 

Miss Ila Broadus, trained nurse, in charge. 

This is a small building of four rooms. It has bathrooms, 
lavatories, toilets, electric lights, hot and cold water, and a gas 
range. The furnishings are entirely comfortable. It is a cosy, 
quiet retreat for students who from time to time may need such 
quiet. The Infirmary is in charge of a trained nurse, most of 
whose time is spent, not in looking after students who are sick, 
but in caring for them to see that they do not get sick. With 
the matrons, she takes general oversight and care of the entire 
student body. The nurse will also give lectures on home nursing, 
hygiene, and sanitation to certain classes during the year. The 
health of the student body has always been superb. 



NEW CARNEGIE LIBRARY. 

This beautiful $25,000 building, the generous gift of Mr. An- 

13 



drew Carnegie, was planned by Messrs. Peabody and Ludlow, 
and built by Moise deLeon. The handsome library furniture is 
substantial as well as beautiful, and is in perfect harmony with 
the elegance of the building. 

Although occupied but three years, the library has awakened 
new interest and has shown a marvelous growth, the circulation 
each year almost doubling that of the previous year. The library 
consists of 8,045 volumes, more than a thousand new books having 
been added during each of the past three years. 

One of the great purposes of the library is to create in the stu- 
dents an interest in good literature, and to encourage a desire for 
reading. Nearly all the studies in a Normal School require ref- 
erence work, and much supplementary material is needed in pre- 
paring lesson plans in history, geography, and other studies. New 
books selected by the departments are added each year to meet 
these needs. Periodical literature is also of great value in refer- 
ence work, and the library subscribes to a number of judiciously 
selected magazines, which are bound as the volumes are complet- 
ed, and with their indexes are of invaluable aid in supplying ma- 
terials for debates and other reference work. 

The library is in charge of a trained librarian and cataloguer, 
and the books are catalogued according to the most approved 
library system. 



EXPENSES. 

Terms for Board. 

(Payable in advance as indicated). 

September 11, 1913— First Payment $ 25.00 

November 13, 1913— Second Payment 25.00 

February 2, 1914— Third Payment 25.00 

April 6, 1914— Fourth Payment 25.00 

$100.00 

Matriculation Fee (to be paid on entrance) $ 10.00 

Board for students who do not make the full quarterly pay- 
ments, as indicated above, will be at the rate of $3.00 per week, 
or 50 cents per day. 

Students who cannot enter at the regular dates will be re- 
ceived at any time during the session just as their opportunities 
may permit, board being charged only from the time of entering 
school. 

All students entering before September 15 will be charged from 
date of opening (Sept. 11.) Those entering on and after September 
15 will be charged from the date they enter school. 

14 



All non-resident students must room and board in the school 
dormitories. No exception will be made to this except by the con- 
sent and approval of the school authorities. 

There is no tuition paid by Georgia students. Students from 
outside the state are required to pay $40.00 per year, $20.00 
upon entrance, and $20.00 at the beginning of the second semester. 

Money deposited on dormitory account will not be refunded. 
Money deposited on personal account may be withdrawn at any 
time. 

Parents and friends visiting students cannot be accommodated 
in the dormitories, as there is no room for them. They can se- 
cure board in the city. 



COLLEGE BOOK STORE. 

The school authorities buy, at the regular dealers' discount, all 
books, stationery, etc., needed by the students. These are sold 
to the student at less than the regular retail rates, and thus a 
considerable sum of money may be saved in the purchase of text- 
books. 



UNIFORMS. 



To promote economy, simplicity, and good taste in dress, every 
young woman in the school, unless specially excused by the Presi- 
dent, is required to purchase and wear the uniform adopted by the 
school. Requests to be excused from wearing the uniform will not 
be considered except for very exceptional and unusual reasons. 

The winter uniform consists of a blue serge suit, blue felt hat, 
white waist of wash material with high collar and long sleeves, 
tan gloves, and black shoes. The suit, hat, and gloves must be 
bought in Athens, and the order for them must be placed before 
the end of the first week after arrival at the school. The cost of 
these three articles will not exceed $16.00. All other necessities 
should be provided before leaving home. 

The summer uniform consists of white waists (as described for 
winter uniform) two white wash skirts, tan straw hat, and black 
shoes. The skirts and hat must be bought in Athens, costing 
about $6.00. 

The above requirements will be rigidly enforced. There must 
be no attempt at evasion or partial violation of these regulations. 
No other articles, however similar, can be substituted for those 
specified. 

15 



The uniform must be worn at such times as the President and 
Uniform Committee may designate. 

Students need not bring to the school evening dresses or clothes 
other than for class room wear. 

Uniforms must be kept in good condition. Special pressing 
and cleaning rates have been secured for students of the State 
Normal School. Students whose coats are in good condition, but 
who desire new skirts may purchase them separately. 

No student may wear a skirt which measures more than six 
inches from the floor. Lengths between three and six inches are 
allowed upon consultation with the matron in charge. 

Students should wear the uniform skirt, hat, and white waist 
when returning to the school in September. All students must 
wear the uniform as a travelling dress at all other times. 

It is very desirable that uniforms be ordered before leaving 
home. A detailed description and order blank will be furnished 
upon request made to the Registrar. 



THE COURSE OF STUDY. 

The subjects bracketed in each class are electives, one of which 
the student must choose. After the minimum number of periods 
required has thus been made up, the student is at liberty to choose 
as options, up to the maximum number of periods allowed, others 
of these elective studies, subjects of the same class in the parallel 
course, or subjects in lower classes in either course, where the 
schedule will permit, it being understood that the maximum shall 
include all regular work, conditions, deficiencies, etc., except in- 
strumental music. 

While due attention is given in all instruction to the acquisition 
by the student of accurate knowledge of subject-matter, all work 
will be presented as by teachers to teachers, on the assumption that 
the student will ultimately teach the subject. 

Students desiring courses providing reviews in common school 
branches in preparation for the state teachers' examination will 
find their needs fully met in the Review Class and in the elective 
and optional subjects offered in the several classes of both courses. 

Students whose time is limited and whose scholarship is irreg- 
ular may choose one of the departmental certificate courses offered, 
with the advice of the head of the department concerned and the 
approval of the President. 



16 



Winter Uniform 




School UNIFORMS Summer Uniform 



COURSE OF STUDY. 



REVIEW. 

These courses are substitutes for the old Half-Year Review and 
One Year Review Courses. 

Applicants for them must have license to teach, present written 
evidence in the form of certificates from their last instructors, or 
show in examination that they have satisfactorily completed at 
least the equivalent of eight scholastic years of study. These 
courses are intended to prepare applicants for the state teachers' 
examination or for advanced work in this school. Applicants should 
choose one of the two courses under the advice of instructors 
here. 



Academic. 

English 4 

History 4 

Algebra 5 

Arithmetic or 

Latin 4 

Physiology or 

Nature Study or 

Economic Geography 3 

Physical Culture 2 



Industrial. 

English 4 

History 4 

Agriculture 2 

Arithmetic 4 

Physiology or 

Nature Study or 

Common School Geography 3 

Physical Culture 2 

Options 3 



22 22 

Maximum 28 Maximum 28 

Optional: Common School Music (1). After the minimum of 
work required in the class has been arranged, optional studies, up 
to the maximum allowed, may be selected from the other Review 
Course. 

FRESHMAN. 

Applicants for this class must present written evidence in the 
form of certificates of the satisfactory completion of at least the 
equivalent of nine grades in the common schools and accredited 
high schools or stand an examination on one of the courses re- 
quired in the Review Class. 



Academic. 



English . . hiYX.%. . C 4 

History ±M-!\XjU / X / . 3 

Plane Geometry 5 

Physiography 2 

Ph B y K r or "I <» L * b -> 

Latin : 4 

Physical Culture 2 




Maximum 



20 
26 



Industrial. 

English 4 

History or 

Mathematics 3 

Elem. Drawing (2 Lab.).... 4 

Handicrafts (1 Lab.) 2 

Physics or \ . 

Biology (1 Lab.). J 4 

Model and Plain Sewing, 

* (1 Lab.) 4 

Agricul. Botany 2 

Physical Culture 2 

24 
Maximum 30 



17 



■ 



Optional: Common School Music (1). After the minimum of 
work required in the class has been arranged, optional studies, 
up to the maximum allowed, may be selected from the Freshman 
course not chosen or from either of the Review classes. 



SOPHOMORE. 

Applicants for this class must present written evidence in the 
form of certificates of the satisfactory completion of at least the 
equivalent of ten grades in the common schools and accredited high 
schools or stand an examination on one of the courses required in 
the Freshman class. 



Academic. Industrial. 

English 



Mathematics 2 

fElem. Arts and Crafts "1 
< Drawing and Color J 

English 4 I (4 Lab.) 8 

Algebra and Geometry 5 f Cooking 

History VUSI&J.\ 2 < Theory of Foods 

Chemistry or \ /1 T oK ^ I (2 Lab.) 6 

Biology or J u ^^ Field Crops and Soils (1 Lab.) 4 

Latin 4 Chemistry 4 

Psychology 3 Psychology 3 

Physical Culture 2 Physical Culture 2 

20 26 

Maximum 26 Maximum 30 

Optional: Common School Music (1). After the minimum of 
work required in the class has been arranged, optional studies, up 
to the maximum allowed, may be selected from the Sophomore 
course not chosen or from any lower class. 



JUNIOR. 

Applicants for this class must present written evidence in the 
form of certificates of the satisfactory completion of at least the 
equivalent of eleven grades in the common schools and accredited 
high schools or stand an examination on one of the courses re- 
quired in the Sophomore class. 

18 






Academic. Industrial. 

English 3 

Economics 2 

f History of Education and 1 

<j Principles of Education J Mech. Drawing, \ ,, A , - 

I 4 Woodwork, Design/ Man - Arts 5 

^Methods 2 Adv. Drawing { A/ , . . ,. 

History or and Colors.. ______ \ Man ' Arts 5 

Mathematics or Dressmaking Dom. Sci. 4 

Latin or Textile and \tw„ tw«,« i 

French or ^Hou'hold Man. / Dom - Science 3 

--German or Millinery and \-n^ w !$_:_,— /i 

Spanish or Art Needlework j Dom - Science 4 

Greek 2 Horticulture "I . . 2 

v-Expression .,. # Animal Husbandry J ^ * 3 

Common School Music 2 Methods "] f2 

- Child Study 2 Hist, and Princ. of Ed. > Required < 4 

^Physical Culture 2 Physical Culture J 12 

23 24 

Maximum 29 Maximum 30 

Optional: After the minimum of work required in the class has 
been arranged, optional studies, up to the maximum allowed, may 
be selected from the Junior course not chosen or from any lower 
class. 

SENIOR. 
Applicants for this class must present written evidence in the 
form of certificates of the satisfactory completion of at least the 
equivalent of twelve grades in the common schools and accredited 
high schools or one year in some reputable college or stand an 
examination in one of the courses required in the Junior class. 
Academic. Industrial. 

Mech. Drawing "\ -. . , , 
and Woodwork... ) Man - Arts 6 

an d d V Co D lor ng .....}Man.Arts4 

English 2 SSSZi!^}^ ^ 4 

Expression 4 Adv. Cooking \ _„, c . _ . 

Mathematics or and Serving __ J Dom ' Science 4 

History or Household Chem. \ n „, c • a 

Latin or and Bacteriology... J uom ' toC1 ' *' 

French or Organization and "j 

German or Management and >Dom. Sci. 3 

Spanish or Dietetics J 

Greek 2 Home Nursing Dom. Sci. 2 

Sociology 2 Farm Management ] 2 

Methods r>rd School Manage- Agricultural Educa, VAgricult. 2 

ment 3 piant Breeding s J 2 

Practice Teaching 4 Sociology ( 2 

Conference l Practice Teaching I P . nilir-H J 4 

Common School Music 2 Conference [ He( » uire M 1 

Physical Culture - 2 Physical Culture J ^2 

22 24 

Maximum 28 Maximum 30 

19 



Optional: After the minimum of work required in the class has 
been arranged, optional studies, up to the maximum allowed, may- 
be selected from the Senior course not chosen or from any lower 
class. 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY AND 
PEDAGOGY, 



J. C. WARDLAW. 
MISS SARA WEBB. 



Sophomore Class. 

Psychology. A course in Psychology from the standpoint of ed- 
ucational theory and practice. The work includes a brief presenta- 
tion of physiological psychology, a study of the nature and func- 
tion of mental processes, with special emphasis on perception, ap- 
perception, memory, association, imagination, thought, induction, 
deduction, feeling, emotion, instinct, interest, attention, will, habit, 
character. 

Text-book: Read's Introductory Psychology. 
References: Thorndike, James, Dewey, Titchener, Angell, Pills- 
bury, Munsterberg, Miller. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the year. 
Junior Class. 

History of Education. A study of the educational ideals, prac- 
tices and tendencies of the past, the great educational reformers, 
and the principles derived from them, the origin and development 
of modern educational theory and practice. The course embraces 
a study of oriental, classical, medieval and renaissance education, 
the educational theories of Comenius, Locke, Rousseau, Pestalozzi, 
Froebel, Herbart, Spencer, present tendencies in education, modern 
school systems, and the American public school. 

Text-book: Parker's History of Modern Elementary Education. 

References: Monroe's Brief Course in History of Education, 
Hoyt's Studies in the History of Modern Education, Graves's Great 
Educators of Three Centuries. 

Four periods a week throughout either 
the first or the second semester. 

20 



Principles of Education. The meaning of education, of the 
school, of the curriculum; the place of instinct, interest and atten- 
tion in the teaching process; principles of teaching based on the 
laws of association, dissociation, apperception, memory, thought, 
action. 

Text-book: Thorndike's Principles of Teaching. 

References: Henderson's Principles of Education, Bolton's Prin- 
ciples of Education, Jones's Principles of Education, Bagley's Edu- 
cational Values. 

Four periods a week throughout either 
the first or the second semester. 

Child Study. Attention is given to the foundations of child study 
in other sciences, and to the more general, permanent, and prac- 
tical truths thus far revealed by students of children, particularly 
regarding their physical nature, growth, development; instincts, 
heredity, individuality; abnormalities and 'defects, with methods 
of remedy; tests and measurements; meaning of infancy, periods 
of childhood; suggestion, habit, moral development, influences 
affecting personality. 

Text-book: Pyle's Educational Psychology. 

References: Kirkpatrick's Fundamentals of Child Study, Rowe's 
Physical Nature of the Child, King's Psychology of Childhood, 
Sully's Studies of Childhood, Hall's Adolescence, Grigg's Moral 
Education, Tyler's Growth and Education. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

The Lesson, Observation, Teaching. Study of the nature, 
structure, function and place of the lesson; the working of the 
child's mind in the progress of the lesson; the development and 
formulation of principles underlying the recitation, the work of the 
teacher in stimulating and guiding the child's activity; making 
lesson plans and teaching lesson wholes under sympathetic and 
constructive criticism; methods of presenting subject matter; ob- 
servation of a variety of type lessons with reports and discussions. 

Four periods a week should be kept free for observation in the 
Training School. 

Text-book: Strayer's Brief Course in the Teaching Process. 

Two ' periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Senior Class. 

General and Special Methods. The aim of education, province 
of method, general principles underlying method; the recitation; 

21 



the organization of subject matter and special methods of teaching 
Reading, Spelling, Language, Grammar, Arithmetic, History, Civ- 
ics, Geography, Nature Study, Drawing, Physiology, Physical 
Training and the correlation of subjects in the course of study. 

This course continues observation and discussion of type les- 
sons taught in the Training School and in the rural school. 

Two periods in the morning and one in the afternoon should be 
reserved for observation and practice. 

Text-book: (To be selected). 

References: Roark's Method in Education, McMurry's series of 
works on method. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the first semester. 

School Management and Supervision. The aims, the teacher, 
qualifications and preparation; course of study, daily program, 
classification, promotion; incentives, coercives; records and grad- 
ing; character building; special emphasis upon the rural school in 
relation to the general rural problem. 

Text-book: Colgrove's The Teacher and the School. 

References: Dutton's School Management, Foght's The Amer- 
ican Rural School, Bagley's Class-room Management, Arnold's 
School and Class Management. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the second semester. 

Observation and Practice Teaching. Connected with the State 
Normal School is a well organized, thoroughly equipped Training 
School of eight grades, which serves both as a school of observa- 
tion and as a school of practice for student-teachers. Two periods 
in the morning and one in the afternoon should be reserved 
throughout the year for observation and practice teaching. Obser- 
vation is begun in the Junior year and continued throughout the 
Senior year. 

As a means of helping to raise the standard of the rural schools 
of the state to meet the social and economic needs of modern rural 
life a rural school has been established in connection with the 
Training School, in which student-teachers are given an oppor- 
tunity to study rural school problems, thereby better fitting them- 
selves for efficient service in country schools. 

The members of the Senior class are required to do practice 
teaching throughout the year in the various grades of the Train- 
ing School and to co-operate in the work of the rural school under 
the supervision and guidance of the head of the department of 
Pedagogy and the Principal of the Training School, with the sym- 

22 



pathetic and constructive criticism of skilled critic teachers. Be- 
fore teaching, detailed lesson plans are prepared and submitted 
for criticism. 

Reading Courses and Current Educational Literature. In addi- 
tion to the regular course of study in this department, courses of 
reading are offered, based upon professional material at hand in 
the pedagogical department of the Carnegie Library of the State 
Normal School. A score or more of current educational periodicals 
coming to the Library form the basis of bi-weekly class confer- 
ences throughout the Junior and Senior years. 

Conferences and Theses. In addition to the bi-weekly class con- 
ferences, the officers and teachers of the department of Pedagogy, 
the officers and teachers of the Training School, and all the mem- 
bers of the Senior class meet once a week for conference and dis- 
cussion of the work of the Training School and vital educational 
problems in general. 

Original investigation of some important phase of education, 
with a written report thereon, is required of members of the 
Senior class. 

School Law. A course of lectures on the salient provisions of the 
laws relating to the common school system of the state. 

CERTIFICATE COURSE IN PEDAGOGY. 

A two-year course is offered by this department for the benefit 
of students whose time may be limited, or whose scholarship may 
be irregular or advanced. A certificate will be awarded upon the 
satisfactory completion of all the work of the department, together 
with such other subjects as may be prescribed by the head of the 
department. 

For admission into this special course, applicants must present 
evidences of scholarship equivalent to that required for admission 
into the Junior class. 



23 



THE TRAINING SCHOOL. 



JERE M. POUND President 

J. C. WARDLAW Director 

MISS KATE E. HICKS Principal 

MISS MARJORIE FORD Critic Teacher 7th and 8th Grades 

MISS IRIS CALL AW AY.... Critic Teacher 5th and 6th Grades 
MISS ELIZABETH YOUNG. . . .Critic Teacher 3rd and 4th Grades 

MISS MARY M. WOODS Critic Teacher 2nd Grade 

MISS IVAH MOYER Critic Teacher 1st Grade 

MISS REBECCA STEWART Teacher of Domestic Science 

MISS LAURA ELDER Teacher of Rural School 



The purpose of the Training School is to give the Juniors arid 
Seniors of the State Normal School an opportunity to observe and 
apply the best theories and methods in education, with the idea 
of putting these into practice in the schools of Georgia. 

The Training School is amply equipped with a shop, a gym- 
nasium, a kitchen, and a dining room, and the different class-rooms 
are well equipped with modern appliances. 

The school is a well organized one of eight grades, and the course 
of study is planned to meet present needs in the life of the child 
and to suit the interests of the various periods of child develop- 
ment. The work, so far as is practicable, is based upon present- 
day industries, and especially the industries which are taught in 
the school: Cooking, Gardening, Sewing, and Manual Training. 
In addition to the industries named, the course of study includes 
Reading, Writing, Spelling, Drawing, Painting, Language and 
Grammar, Literature, Elementary Science, Geography, Arithmetic, 
Algebra, History, Music, and Physical Training. 

Before any student is permitted to do practice teaching in the 
Training School, the equivalent of academic and professional work 
as given in the Junior class of the State Normal School must be 
satisfactorily completed. 

The Senior class is divided into two sections; one section teaches 
while the other section observes and makes plans for teaching. 
Practice teaching is done four days a week — sixteen lessons 
forty-five minutes in length, constituting a month's teaching. 
Regular Seniors are required to teach three and one-half months. 

24 



Before teaching in the Training School each student-teacher is 
assigned a grade and a subject for one month, and is required to 
make, for her teaching, detailed plans which must be submitted to 
the critic teacher for correction. After the teaching assignment 
is made, four plans each week must be submitted to the critic 
teacher in charge, and eight plans must be accepted before any 
student-teacher will be permitted to teach. 

Before taking charge of any grade, the student-teacher must 
observe at least eight lessons in the grade in which she is to teach, 
and preferably eight lessons in the subject which she is to teach. 
She must learn each child of the grade by name, and must learn 
the regular critic teacher's method of managing the grade. 

The practice teaching is done under the supervision of the critic 
teacher, the Director and the Principal of the school exercising 
general supervision. 

In rating the student-teacher's ability, the critic teacher con- 
siders the following points, or similar ones: 

1. General intelligence, knowledge of the subject matter, ability 
to select vital points in a lesson and to concentrate teaching about 
these points. 

2. Earnestness, persistence, promptness, responsiveness to sug- 
gestions, attitude toward criticism, helpful school spirit. 

3. English expression, culture, courtesy, neatness, voice, car- 
riage, poise and confidence. 

4. Ability to manage children, getting and holding attention, 
handling disturbing elements, keeping all children profitably em- 
ployed. 

5. Initiative in planning, securing and using adequate materials, 
care of materials, care of the room. 

6. Modes of conducting recitations, economizing time, definite 
purpose and end in view, corrections of the children's English. 

The Rural School Problem. 

Modern educational thought has centered about the city school; 
social and economic forces have developed the city more rapidly 
than the country, which has resulted in a drift of population from 
the country to the city thereby retarding the growth of the country 
school and country life in general. 

It is our purpose with a model building and modern equipment 
to help in adjusting the rural school to the agricultural and do- 
mestic life of the country; to demonstrate ways in which a rural 
school may be the social center of community life; to adjust the 
course of study to rural conditions and interest; to study the prob- 
lem of the consolidation of schools, and to show what may be done 
by one teacher in carrying out a practical course of study. 

25 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH. 



P. F. BROWN. 
MISS CHLOE LOYD. 
MRS. G. A. ALEXANDER. 



The study of English covers the special branches, Composition, 
Grammar, Rhetoric, and Literature. The study of Composition 
has for its purpose the acquisition of correct habits of expression 
in written English; of Grammar, a thorough knowledge of the 
principles that guide the student to correct forms; of Rhetoric, the 
study and practice of a clear, forceful and elegant style of written 
expression; and of Literature, an acquaintance with and appre- 
ciation of the peculiar charms in the style of every great American 
and English author. This last can be obtained only through a 
study of the works of these authors in connection with their his- 
torical setting. The courses in Literature in the lower classes are 
historical courses in American and English literature. Those in 
the upper classes deal with the development of all the special 
forms of literature. 

Review Class. 

Composition: Hanson's English. 
Composition: Occasional Themes. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Literature: A history of American Literature, and study of the 
following classics: 

For study in class: Bryant's Thanatopsis, Irving's Sketch-book, 
Webster's First Bunker Hill Oration, Emerson's Essays, Lowell's 
The Vision of Sir Launfal, Whittier's Snow-Bound. 

For reading and reports: Franklin's Autobiography, Poe's Tales 
and Poems, Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans, Longfellow's 
Narrative Poems, Hawthorne's The House of the Seven Gables, 
Hale's A Man Without a Country, Grady's Addresses, The Southern 
Poets. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

26 



Freshman Class. 

Rhetoric: Genung's Working Principles of Rhetoric. Themes. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Literature: English Literature of the Eighteenth and Nine- 
teenth Centuries. A brief history of the periods covered, accom- 
panied by a study of the latter part of Newcomer and Andrews' 
Twelve Centuries of English Poetry and Prose. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Sophomore Class. 

Review of Composition and Grammar: 

Academic: Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 
Industrial: One period a week throughout 
the year. 

Literature: Early English literature through the seventeenth 
century. A brief history of this portion of English literature will 
be used and accompanied by studies in Newcomer-Andrews' 
Twelve Centuries of Poetry and Prose. For both academic and in- 
dustrial students. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Junior Class. 

Literature and the Writing of Themes. 

l.^Elements and Kinds of Literature. ; A course of lectures and 
discussions in the class and readings outside. Occasional themes. 
Special attention will be paid to the history of the essay and the 
novel. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the first semester. 

2. The Study of the Drama. This course consists of two parts: 
I. History; II. Technique. The aim is threefold: 1. To give 
students a cursory view of the development of the drama from the 
fifteenth century to the present time. 2. To give the students 
enough knowledge of the technique of the dramatic art to enable 
them to discriminate correctly in their choice and judgment of 

27 



plays read and seen. 3. To make students enjoy what is good and 
shun what is poor. 

Texts: Woodbdridge's The Drama; Its Laws and Technique; 
Manly's Specimens of Elizabethan Drama. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the second semester. 

Senior Class. 

Literature and Themes. 

1. Studies in Tennyson and Browning. 

Two plays and the chief poems of these authors will be critically 
studied. Browning's work in the dramatic monologue will be par- 
ticularly stressed, and Tennyson's compass and finish of style. 
These studies will be followed by a brief critical study in com- 
parison of both men and their works. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the first semester. 

2. Literature for the Grades. A course in story-telling, pre- 
paratory to teaching literature in the public schools. The stories 

Vy., are derived from books of fables, folk-lore, myths, and history and 

) * literature. Much drill in the telling of these is given. 

> S» Two periods a week throughout 

the second semester. 

Special Course of Study for a Certificate in English. 

All the English offered in Freshman, Sophomore, Junior and 
Senior years, or its equivalent, 17; Expression — Junior and Senior, 
8; Psychology — Sophomore, 4; Latin — two years, 4; One Modern 
Language — two years, 4; the following additional courses in lit- 
erature: History of the Novel (Jun.), History of the Essay (Jun.), 
4; Principles of literary criticism (Sen.), 3; two years 44 periods. 



28 



DEPARTMENT OF EXPRESSION. 



MRS. G. A. ALEXANDER. 



The object of this department is to produce effective readers 
and speakers, and competent teachers of the subject of reading; 
to substitute simple, natural methods of expression for the faulty 
delivery which commonly prevails. The aim is to supply to those 
who use the voice a course as scientific and thorough as can be 
found in any phase of education; to supply a course which is 
conducive to health; and to add a personal accomplishment. The 
scope of the work is indicated by the following outline of courses: 

Junior Class. 

Lessons in Articulation — freedom of organs of speech; place- 
ment; accurate moulding of the elements of speech; pronuncia- 
tion. 

Vocal Technique — breath control; development of resonance; 
placing of tones; purity; tone projection; flexibility; compass; 
smoothness; power, and brilliancy of tones; freedom. 

Texts used: Phillip's Natural Drill in Expression, and Evolution 
of Expression — the sixteen progressive and graded steps through 
which the pupil may be brought to a realization of the criteria 
of the teacher. Study of selections from the great orators, essay- 
ists, dramatists, and poets, illustrative of these sixteen steps; the 
meaning of the steps, and their relation and interdependence; drill 
work and application to the individual need of the pupil. The 
methods of instruction in this course are based upon the funda- 
mental laws according to which the mind unfolds. The work is 
fundamental, because it develops something in the pupil's mind 
power at every step; and practical, inasmuch as his practice is 
constantly tested by his ability to move his audience. 

Literary Analysis — fundamental principles of expression; intel- 
lectual conception; development of power to read ideas; training 
of the eye; cultivation of simple emotions; series of studies for de- 
velopment of directness; practical exercises for cultivation of an- 
imation in reading and speaking, and in naturalness and simplicity; 
relation of reader to audience; commanding attention; intensity 

29 



of expression; development of momentum; studies in light and 
shade; subtlety; studies in fulfillment of author's purpose; studies 
in atmosphere. 

Dramatic interpretation, and presentation of scenes from the 
best dramatists. Richard II, Richard III, Julius Caesar, As You 
Like It. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Senior Class. 

To some extent, time during this year must be given to methods, 
in order to prepare the students for teaching. This part of the 
work will consist in methods for Primary and Grammar grades, 
and will include lectures, discussions, and practical illustrative ex- 
ercises. Some of the phases of reading studied are: the relation 
of reading to other studies in the curriculum; methods of getting 
good reading; enunciation and pronunciation; phonics; pitch, in- 
flection, modulation, model work; the development lesson; conduct 
of the reading lesson; emphasis of the importance of good oral 
reading on the part of the teacher. 

The Senior work will also include Prose Forms, and Poetic Inter- 
pretation — expressive study of Description and Narrative; Epic, 
Lyric, and Dramatic poetry, with special reference to the needs 
of the interpreter. Drill on steps of advanced criteria of expres- 
sion. 

Dramatic study and interpretation, plot, character study, and 
presentation of scenes from Shakespeare, and from modern 
dramatists, as Ibsen, Rostand, Hauptmann, Maeterlinck, Yeats. 
Thorough study of Browning and the Dramatic Monologue. 

Required reading: Hamlet, Othello, Lear, and Macbeth. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Certificate Course in Expression. 

A certificate will be awarded in Expression to those students 
who complete the entire required work offered in the subject, 
and who also complete courses in the required work offered in 
Literature, Junior and Senior; Psychology; History of Education; 
Child Study; Principles of Education; Methods; Physiology; Rhet- 
oric; Common School Music; one Modern Language; Physical 
Culture. 

No certificate will be awarded for less than two years' work. 

30 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS. 



T. E. HOLLINGSWORTH. 
MISS ANNIE MATHEWS. 



ACADEMIC COURSE. 
Review Class. 

1. Algebra. An elementary course; a thorough treatment of 
the essential topics; including work closely correlated with arith- 
metic, domestic science, manual arts, and the natural sciences. 

Five periods a week throughout 
the year. 

2. Arithmetic. In this course emphasis is placed upon the fun- 
damental principles and processes and a thorough drill upon the 
most practical topics. Many problems and exercises are made 
from data concerning various industries. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Freshman Class. 

1. Plane Geometry. In this course exercises requiring the use 
of instruments in constructions are given from the first. Demon- 
strations are immediately followed by applications in original and 
practical exercises. 

Five periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Sophomore Class. 

1. Advanced Algebra. This course will include (1) a brief re- 
view of the fundamental operations, factoring, etc., of the first 
course, and (2) graphs of both linear and quadratic equations, 
determinants of the second and third orders, the binomial theorem, 
and other topics not adequately treated in the first course. 

Five periods a week throughout 
the first semester. 

31 



2. Geometry. The work of this course centers about mensura- 
tion and is very practical, special attention being given to actual 
measurements and constructions in the mensuration of surfaces 
and solids. The course furnishes abundant applications of arith- 
metic, algebra, and geometry. 

Five periods a week throughout 
the second semester. 

Junior Class. 

1. Trigonometry. This course emphasizes the practical side of 
the subject, including drawing to scale in platting areas, calculat- 
ing heights and distances, field practice in the use of simple instru- 
ments, etc. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

2. Advanced Arithmetic. This is a course designed (1) for those 
students who may apply for a certificate in mathematics and (2) 
for students from high schools not requiring a review of arithmetic. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Senior Class. 

1. Analytic Geometry. An elementary course. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

2. Brief Reviews in Elementary Mathematics. This optional 
course is especially designed for students who may desire reviews 
in one or more of the subjects given in the lower classes in order 
to secure a certificate in mathematics or to prepare for teaching. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

INDUSTRIAL COURSE. 
Review Class. 

1. Arithmetic. A practical course, largely industrial. Outlined 
in the academic course. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the year. 

2. Algebra. An elementary course. Outlined in the academic 
course. 

Five periods a week throughout 
the year. 

32 




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Freshman Class. 

1. Practical problems related to science and manual arts. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the year. 

2. Plane Geometry. This course is outlined in the academic 
course. 

Five periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Sophomore Class. 

1. Book-keeping. In this course emphasis is placed upon the 
keeping of home and farm accounts. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

2. Advanced Algebra and Geometry. This course is explained 
in the academic course. 

Five periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Junior Class. 

The courses outlined in the Junior class of the academic course 
are optional in the industrial course. 

Senior Class. 

The courses in the Senior class of the academic course are 
optional for students in the Industrial course. 

CERTIFICATE COURSE. 

This course will be required of students who may apply for a 
course leading to a certificate in mathematics, subjects other than 
those named below being elected by the student in consultation 
with the head of the department of mathematics, to complete the 
minimum number of periods per week required in each class of 
the Academic course. 

Review Class. 

Algebra •• 5 

Arithmetic 4 

English 4 

History * 4 

Minimum 22 

33 



Freshman Class. 

Geometry 5 

English 4 

Physics 4 

History 3 

Minimum 20 

(Equivalent work done in university accredited high schools (or 
higher institutions) will be accepted in this course through the 
Freshman class of this school, but in the higher classes examina- 
tions will be required in the mathematics of the course.) 

Sophomore Class. 
Algebra and 

Geometry 5 

English 4 

Chemistry 4 

Psychology 4 

Minimum 20 

Junior Class. 

Trigonometry 2 

Arithmetic 3 

Also the professional work required in the Department of Ped- 
agogy. 

Minimum 23 

Senior Class. 

Analytic Geometry 2 

Elementary Mathematics (unless given special passes in these 

subjects by the head of the department of mathematics) 2 

Also the professional work required in the Department of Ped- 
agogy. 

Minimum 22 



34 



DEPARTMENT OF ELEMENTARY SCIENCE, 



D. L. EARNEST. 
MISS CHLOE ALLEN. 



Review Class. 
Physiology. The course offered in physiology in both the Indus- 
trial and Academic classes will undertake the study of the body, 
its structure, functions and uses. Special attention will be given 
to the subjects of health, hygiene and sanitation. The department 
is well equipped with microscopes, lantern slides and specimens, 
and as much individua 1 laboratory work will be done as time will 
permit. 

The text used will be Conn and Budington's Advanced Physiol- 
ogy and Hygiene. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the year. 
Freshman Class. 
Physics. The work offered in this class is the same for both 
courses. The general laws of nature and their application to 
everyday conditions, the relationship of matter and force, the sub- 
jects of energy, momentum, etc., will be studied from the stand- 
point of the student and teacher. Effort will be made (1) to ac- 
quire training in dexterity, order and efficiency; (2) to secure 
accuracy of observation; (3) to develop the power of understanding 
and reasoning. 

The text used will be selected later. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the year. 
Sophomore Class. 
Chemistry. The work in chemistry in both Industrial and Aca- 
demic courses will extend the student's acquaintance with the 
structure and property of matter. The course is designed to offer 
a practical knowledge of this subject suited to the home, the farm 
and the shop. Much of the work required will be performed in the 
department laboratory which is thoroughly equipped for all pur- 
poses. A fee of one dollar is charged for each semester. 
The text used will be Brownlee and others. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the year. 

35 




DEPARTMENT OF RURAL ECONOMICS. 



E. C. BRANSON. 
MISS P. B. NEWTON. 



Purposes: (1) to give a simple, safe background to thinking 
about our home state, our home counties, and communities, and 
their problems; (2) to arouse our students to an intelligent study 
of home-life conditions, causes, and consequences; (3) to quicken 
in them a sturdy civic and social conscience and concern; and (4) 
to bring all our thinking to bear at last upon education as a cura- 
tive and reparative agency in social progress. 

The authorities of the school believe that we ought thoroughly 
to know the state that the school was created to serve; and that 
students while learning about Greece and Rome ought also to be- 
come lovingly familiar with their mother state and their home 
counties. 

To this end, student groups from the various counties use their 
spare moments, sometimes for months, in studying their home 
counties, comparing each county with itself during the census 
period and ranking it with all the other counties of the state. 
Their report makes a sort of business man's balance sheet, showing 
in detail how the county has moved forward or dropped to the rear- 
ward during the ten years. 

Fifty-nine such county studies have been completed and pub- 
lished in the county papers; in some instances in booklet form for 
thorough study by the farmers and business people, the teachers 
and school authorities, the physicians and ministers. 

Junior Class. 

Burch and Nearing's Elements of Economics, first semester; and 
Fiske's "Challenge of the Country," second semester. 

References: Carver's Principles of Rural Economics, and Tay- 
lor's Agricultural Economics. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

36 



Senior Class. 

Ell wood's Sociology and Modern Social Problems, first semester; 
and Gillette's Constructive Rural Sociology, second semester. 

References: Country Life (American Academy of Political and 
Social Science), Bailey's Country Life Movement, Foght's Ameri- 
can Country School. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Georgia Club. 

Once a week, for volunteers from the faculty and all classes of 
the student body; consultations in the department offices all day 
every day, between recitations, with students working upon county 
reports. 

The club numbers 216 members, and represents 94 counties, and 
five states. 

Reference Library. 

Collateral reading is indicated for students making a special 
study of Country Life Problems and taking special courses in 
Rural Economics and Sociology. The department library is full of 
the choicest books published on these subjects. 



37 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY. 



ROBERTA HODGSON. 
JESSIE L. REDD. 



The Department of History aims to give such knowledge of the 
past as is essential to the understanding of life today, to train 
students in accuracy of study, in the use of library references and 
in the expression of trustworthy opinions on facts, to furnish train- 
ing and experience in methods of historical teaching to the future 
teachers of Georgia. 

No course in General History may be offered as an equivalent 
for any entrance requirement, nor will it be accepted as credit for 
any work done in the History Department of the State Normal 
School. 

Review Class. 

An elementary course in Ancient History. 
Pre-requisite. One year of United States History and Civics. 
Aim. This course will lay the foundation for the proper under- 
standing of history and civics with emphasis on the origins of 
law, government and culture. 

Text-book: A History of the Ancient World (G. W. Botsford). 

Four periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Freshman Class. 

An elementary course in English History. 

Pre-requisite. One year U. S. History; one year Ancient History. 
Aim. A sound and thorough knowledge of the facts of English 
governmental growth as a basis for our own history. 
Text-book: Cheney's Short History of England. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Sophomore Class. 

An elementary course in Mediaeval History. 
Pe-requisite. One year of U. S. History; one year of Ancient 
History; one year of English History. 

38 



The aim of this course is a thorough understanding of the origin 
of great institutions. 

Text-book: To be selected. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Junior Class. 

An elementary course in Modern History. 

Pre-requisite. One year of U. S. History; one year of Ancient 
History; one year of Mediaeval History. 

The aim of this course in an understanding of the formation of 
nations with special emphasis on the growth of democracy. 
Text-book: SchwilFs Political History of Modern Europe. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Senior Class. 

A course in U. S. History. 

Pre-requisite. One year in Elementary U. S. History; one year 
in Ancient History; one year in Mediaeval History; one year in 
Modern History. 

The aim of this course is to understand the origins of our own 
nation, and to gain some familiarity with the sources of history. 
The course will consist largely of the use of library references 
which will be tested by written abstracts. 

Text-book: Muzzey's American History. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the year. 

For a certificate with History as a major, additional History 
courses will be offered with work in Geography, Economics, Civics, 
English and Psychology as may be recommended by the head of 
the department. Special courses however cannot be offered to 
classes of less than ten. 



39 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY AND 
NATURE STUDY. 



F. A. MERRILL. 
MISS JESSIE REDD. 



GEOGRAPHY. 



Geography is now recognized as a collegiate study in the best 
schools of this and foreign countries. All of the important train- 
ing schools of college rank in Germany and France offer advanced 
work along this line. The demand for a thorough and more ex- 
tensive knowledge of earth formations and earth conditions that 
have controlled man's civilization is strongly felt in the educational 
life of today. The Normal School offers a regular course in geog- 
raphy to prepare the teacher for the usual requirements of the 
state common schools and a certificate course that gives greater 
opportunities to increase individual knowledge and culture along 
lines of geographic thought. 

Review Class. 

Academic Course. A thorough study of the economic features 
of geography will be undertaken in the Review Class. Plant and 
animal distribution, natural resources and food supply, constructive 
material areas and manufacturing possiblities will be treated as 
fully as time will permit. 

The text-book used will be Dryer's High School Geography, 
(Three parts.) 

Three periods a week throughout 
the year* 

Industrial Course. The aim sought in this geography course is 
to give a general review of primary geography, emphasizing the 
great world movements in their relations to man's development. 
A thorough familiarity of geographic fact and data is necessary 
to a right teaching of the subject. 

The text-book used will be Maury's New Complete Geography, 
Georgia Edition. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the year. 

40 




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Freshman Class. 

Advanced physiography in its more detailed application to the 
United States will be given in this class. The natural forces that 
have made and modified the conditions under which we live will 
be studied. Special attention will be given to the subject of Geor- 
gia geography. 

The text-book used will be Salisbury, Barrows and Tower's Ele- 
ments of Geography and Merrill's Field and Laboratory Manual in 
Physical Geography. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Certificate Course in Geography. 

Candidates for the Certificate Course in Geography must have 
completed the work required in the first two years of this school 
or offer its equivalent from work done in other accredited high 
schools. Upon the completion of the work outlined, certificates in 
Geography will be granted by this department. 



Sophomore. 

Mineralogy 2 

Regional geography 2 

English 4 

History .• 2 

Mathematics 5 

Psychology 3 

Biology 4 

Physical culture 2 



24 



Senior. 

Conservation 4 

Geography methods 3 

English 2 

History 2 

Mathematics 2 

Sociology 2 

Practice teaching 4 

Conference 1 

Physical culture 2 



22 



Junior. 

Meteorology 3 

Commercial geography 3 

English 3 

History 2 

Mathematics 2 

Child study 2 

Agriculture 5 

Economics 2 

Physical culture 2 



24 



41 



NATURE STUDY. 

Review Class. 

The work in Nature Study will cover a common knowledge of 
those natural things about us as a preparation to a fuller under- 
standing of nature's laws. As much outdoor work as is practi- 
cable will be undertaken. 

The text-book used will be Merrill's What to Teach in Nature 
Study. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Freshman Class. 

Biology: A primary course in the first principles of biology is 
offered in this class. A simple study of plant and animal life will 
be made and as much laboratory work undertaken as time will 
permit. 

The text used will be selected later. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Sophomore Class. 

Biology: A more advanced course than that in the Freshman 
class will be offered. A systematic study of plants, their histology 
and economic uses, of animals and their values to man and of in- 
sects in relation to agriculture will be undertaken. As much of the 
work as possible will be field and laboratory exercises. 
The text used will be selected later. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the year. 



42 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 



E. S. SELL. 
ALEXANDER RHODES. 



Review Class. 



Agriculture, The improvement of plants and animals, propaga- 
tion of plants, the soil, maintaining soil fertility, forests, orchards, 
feeding animals and farm management will be studied in this 
course. The text will be supplemented by the instructor and the 
students will be taken into the fields for practical observations. 
Text: Elements of Agriculture, Warren. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Freshman A. 

Agricultural Botany. Seed germination, growth, roots, stem, 
flowers and fruit. Cryptogams. Emphasis will be placed on the 
practical and experimental phase of botany — showing the relation 
of the structure of the plant to the cultivation and fertilization, 
etc. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 
Text: Practical Course in Botany, Andrews. 



Sophomore Class. 

Field Crops. A detailed study will be made of corn, cotton and 
oats. The structure of the seed, the composition, the different 
varieties, how to improve them, the soil best adapted to the growth 
of the crops, the cultivation, the harvesting and their enemies. 

Text: Southern Field Crops, Duggar. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the first semester. 
..Soils. Soil builders, the nature of soils, the benefits of tillage, 
drainage, irrigation, the maintaining of soil fertility, farm ma- 
nure and commercial fertilizers. Laboratory work with different 

43 



types of soils and school gardening will be included in this course. 
Text: Soils, Fletcher. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the second semester. 

Junior Class. 

Fruit Growing. The location of an orchard, planting, tillage and 
orchard management. Practical work will be done in pruning, 
grafting and budding. 

Text: Principles of Fruit Growing, Bailey. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the first semester. 

Vegetable Gardening. The selection of a garden site as to soil, 
convenience, drainage and general effect. The planning of a garden, 
the fertilizers to be used and the vegetables best adapted to the 
locality. 

Text: Manual of Gardening, Bailey. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the second semester. 

Animal Husbandry. The relation of farm animals to agriculture, 
the relation of soil fertility to diversified farming. Cattle, horses, 
sheep, etc., with a careful study of the dairy cow and the care that 
is necessary for the best results. Amount and composition of milk, 
Babcock test, the cream separator and the profits from different 
methods of dairying. 

Text: Profitable Stock Feeding, Smith. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the first semester. 

Poultry. Importance of poultry raising, size and location of 
poultry house and characteristics of the different breeds. Practical 
work will be given in the feeding and care of poultry as well as 
the operating of incubators and brooders. 
Text: Farm Poultry, Watson. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the second semester. 

Senior Class. 

Farm Management. Farm plans, including size and location of 
fields, buildings, fences, roads, different types of farming, labor, 
ownership and rental, market problems, co-operation, records and 
accounts. 

Text: Farm Management, Card. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

44 



Plant Breeding. The causes of variation, the improvement of 
plants under cultivation, effects of crossing, how domestic varieties 
originate and some recent opinions on the evolution of plants. 
Text: Plant Breeding, Bailey. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Agricultural Education. The importance of school children en- 
tering into various contests, such as corn clubs, tomato clubs, etc., 
and how to organize such contests. The general trend of agricul- 
tural education. 

Text: Education for Efficiency, Davenport, and current agri- 
cultural bulletins. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the first semester. 

Rural School Grounds and Buildings. The necessity of pleasant 
surroundings and how to obtain them, the planting of trees, shrubs, 
vines and decorative gardens. Inside decorations and conveniences. 
Text: Bulletins from Department of Agriculture. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the second semester. 



45 



DEPARTMENT OF LATIN. 



MISS IDA A. YOUNG. 



The aim of this course is not only to obtain mastery of forms 
by insistent drills in paradigms and vocabularies with a view to 
translation, but also to secure mental discipline, improvement in 
English, and the benefits to be derived from a study of the con- 
tents on the literary, historical, ethical and aesthetic sides. 

Review Class. 

The work in this class is planned for beginners, and for those 
who wish to review the subject. 
Text: Latin for Beginners, D'ooge. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the year. 
Freshman Class. 
Work for first half year will be readings from Viri Romae. 
Second half year, Caesar, Book IV, First Invasion of Britain, 
Chaps. 20-35; Book V, Second Invasion of Britain, Chaps. 1-23; 
Book IV, First Invasion of Germany, Chaps. 1-19. These chapters 
are chosen because the indirect discourse passages are less difficult 
than in Book I, and also because they give accounts of campaigns 
against early British ancestors. 

Text: Lindsay's Lives of Nepos, Caesar. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the year. 
I, II, III Orations Against Cataline; I, Orations for Achias. 
Composition work based upon Cicero, by D'Ooge. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the year. 
Junior Class. 
Work in Virgil; I, II, IV, VI Books of Aeneid. The aim sought 
in the study of Virgil is to make the students realize that they 
are studying a great literature, one to which literature in general 
is indebted. 

Sophomore Class. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 
Senior Class. 
First half year, select Odes from Horace. Second half year, 
Livy. Grammar Reviews. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

46 



DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN AND GREEK. 



MISS HELEN L. SPROUT. 



GERMAN. 
Junior Class. 



German I. The course consists of careful drill upon pronuncia- 
tion, the inflection of the articles, of such nouns as belong to the 
language of every-day life, of pronouns, adjectives, weak verbs, 
and the more usual strong verbs, also upon the use of the modal 
auxilaries, and word order. Translation from English into Ger- 
man and the reading of 75-100 pages of easy prose. 
The text-book used will be Kellar's First Year German. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Senior Class. 

German II. The reading of from 200-300 pages of good litera- 
ture in prose and poetry, and reference reading upon the lives and 
works of the great writers. Continued drill upon the rudiments of 
grammar; sight translation and conversation. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

GREEK. 

Junior Class. 

Greek I. This course gives special attention to elementary 
syntax with the principal parts of about one hundred common 
irregular verbs. There is also practice in reading at sight. 
The text-book used will be White's First Greek Book. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Senior Class. 

Greek II. The reading of Books I and II Xenophon's Anabasis, 
with grammatical review. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

47 



DEPARTMENT OF FRENCH AND SPANISH, 



JOSEPH LUSTRAT. 



I. FRENCH. 



A two-year elective course offered to Juniors and Seniors and 
optional with some other studies as shown in curriculum. 

First Year French — Junior Class. 

Thorough study of grammar and syntax. 

In the last part of the year, reading of French text, translation 
and the writing of lessons in French. 
Practice in conversational French. 

Two periods per week throughout 
the year. 
Second Year French — Senior Class. 
Continuation of first year in grammar and syntax. 
Translation from English into French; dictation; French com- 
position; reading of about six hundred pages of standard authors, 
classical and modern; parallel reading and conversational French. 

Two periods per week throughout 
the year. 
II. SPANISH. 
A two-year elective course offered to Juniors and Seniors and 
optional with some other studies as shown in curriculum. 
First Year Spanish — Junior Class. 
Introductory Spanish course based upon natural method and the 
most essential rudiments of grammar. Inflections, forms, verbs 
and syntax are carefully taught from the beginning. 

Translation — Reading of easy Spanish text — practice in con- 
versational Spanish. 

Two periods per week throughout 
the year. 

Second Year Spanish — Senior Class. 

Continuation of first year in grammar and syntax. 
Translations from English into Spanish; dictation; Spanish com- 
position; reading of about six hundred pages of standard authors; 
parallel reading and conversational Spanish. 

Two periods per week throughout 
the year. 

48 







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DEPARTMENT OF DOMESTIC ARTS AND 

SCIENCE, 



MISS EDNA M. RANDALL. 
MISS PARNA B. HILL. 
MISS REBECCA STEWART. 



That housekeeping should be regarded as a profession, and 
that every young woman needs as definite a training for her fu- 
ture work in the home as a young man does for his in the business 
world, are facts which dc not require demonstration. The Depart- 
ment of Domestic Arts and Science offers the opportunity for this 
much-needed and many-sided training to every young woman in 
the State Normal School. 

Freshman Class. 
Model Sewing. Includes the making of a series of models 
illustrating practical and ornamental stitches. Examples, hem- 
ming, darning, patching, gathering, plackets seams, button-holes, 
application of lace, insertion and embroidery, hemstitching, feath- 
er-stitching. The work, mounted in permanent form, must be 
submitted with a note-book to the instructor. The purpose of 
the course is to develop accuracy, neatness and skill, and to be 
suggestive of simple sewing lessons which can be given pupils in 
rural and graded schools. Fee, $2.00 per year. 

Four periods a week throughout 

the first semester. 

Plain Sewing follows Model Sewing. Simple pattern drafting 

to measurement under supervision of the instructor. A series of 

simple garments are made — a cooking apron and three or four 

pieces of underwear. Materials furnished by students. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the second semester. 

Sophomore Class. 
Elementary Cookery. Fundamental principles of cookery with 
emphasis upon right habits of work.. The theory of and practice 
in the preparation of cereals, breads, pastries, meats, fish, salads, 
sandwiches, cakes, frozen desserts, etc. Fee, $4 per year. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the year. 

49 



Theory of Foods. Closely correlated with Elementary Cookery. 
A lecture and recitation course including a study of the physiol- 
ogy of digestion and absorption followed by a detailed study of 
typical foods: e. g., cereals, legumes, sugars, starches, meats, 
milk, cheese, eggs, green vegetables, fruits. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Junior Class. 

Dressmaking. Prerequisite: Model and Plain Sewing. Con- 
tinued study of patterns and pattern drafting. During the year 
students will draft patterns for and make to their own measure- 
ment a tailored shirtwaist and skirt, wool skirt and two dresses 
of wash material. The Snow System of Pattern Drafting is used. 
Cost of System, with instruction books, $3. Fee for course, 50 
cents in addition to above, each semester. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Textiles. The history of clothing and its production. A study 
of the four important textile fibres — cotton, flax, silk and wool, 
methods of manufacture, a comparison of the wearing qualities 
and cost of fabrics made from them. An effort is made to develop 
good taste and judgment in purchasing materials for school and 
home use. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the first semester. 

Household Management. A detailed study of the problems con- 
nected with the heating, lighting, and ventilation of the house, dis- 
posal of wastes, division of income and keeping of household ac- 
counts; a consideration of the functions of the home in maintaining 
the health and efficiency of the family. 

Three periods a week throughout 
the second semester. 

Millinery. The course begins with fundamental work-stitches, 
making of bandeau, frames, bows, folds, plaitings; renovating and 
tinting. This preliminary work is followed by making a winter 
hat on a buckran frame, a spring hat of braid and a summer lin- 
gerie hat. Fee, $1 for practice materials. Students furnish own 
material for hats. 

Art Needlework. This course includes simple embroidery adapted 
to school work, knitting and crocheting. Application of these 
stitches on simple articles. All materials furnished by student. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the year. 

50 



Senior Class. 

Advanced Cooking and Serving. Prerequisite: Elementary 
Cookery. The study of and practice in canning and preserving 
of fruits and vegetables, the preparation of the more difficult 
forms of breads, pastry, meats, salads, desserts, etc. 

Study of the making of menus, with practice in the serving of 
meals. The class is divided into groups of four, one of which 
plans a menu, prepares and serves a complete meal each week. 
The cost must come within a definite sum. Fee, $4 a year. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Household Chemistry. A laboratory course including a study of 
the chemistry of water, air, fuels, soap; of the food principles and 
analysis of typical foods; experiments in artificial digestion, food 
adulteration. Fee, $1. Prerequisite: General chemistry. 

Bacteriology. A laboratory course including a study of the cell, 
molds, yeast, forms of bacteria, their distribution and relation to 
disease and the industries, disinfection, sterilization, incubation, 
immunity; making of culture media, staining solutions, and slides; 
use of compound miscroscope. Fee, $1. Prerequisite: General 
chemistry and physiology. 

Four periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Dietetics. Prerequisite: Elementary Cookery and Food Study. 
A lecture and laboratory course. Study of energy, protein, and 
mineral requirement, effect of age, sex, and occupation on food 
requirement, infant and child feeding, diet in disease, the planning 
of menus with reference to bodily needs and cost. 

Three periods a week throughout 
24 weeks. 

Organization and Management of Home Economic Classes. The 

history of Domestic Science in the United States, Courses of Study, 
Equipment, and Cost of Maintenance. Lecture and recitation. 

Three periods a week throughout 
12 weeks. 

Home Nursing. Home care of the sick. What to do in emergen- 
cies, hygiene, care of children; preventment and treatment of dis- 
ease. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 



51 



DEPARTMENT OF MANUAL ARTS, 



MISS ANNIE LINTON. 
MISS MAUDE TOWNSEND. 



The course of manual arts has for its ultimate aim the welfare 
of the school child, his increased usefulness and happiness in his 
home and school life. 

The work of the department is planned to give practical train- 
ing in the graphic, plastic and mechanical arts. 

It is hoped that the graduates of this department will know how 
to plan inexpensive, convenient, artistic home and school buildings 
and how to inaugurate courses of study which will train the child 
physically, mentally and aesthetically, through his interest in the 
making of articles of use and beauty for the home and school. 

Students selecting manual arts will have work as outlined below 
and upon the satisfactory completion of the course with certain 
other required work will receive an industrial diploma. 

Students taking the academic course may select work from the 
Manual Arts Department to fill out their maximum number of 
periods. A conference with the head of the department being nec- 
essary in order to decide on the special phase of work. 

A fee of $2 a term will be charged for the purchase of materials. 

Freshman Class. 

1. Elementary Drawing. Theory and practice of drawing. Rep- 
resentation from nature and still life, etc., in silhouette, outline and 
mass. From plant life careful study will be made of facts of 
growth, jointing and color. From object drawing comes study of 
form and proportion. Study of color scale and color harmonies in- 
troduced. Mediums for this work: Pencil, colored crayon, char- 
coal, ink and brush, water color. 

2. Handicrafts. Practical work and discussion of problems and 
processes in paper and cardboard construction, clay modeling, weav- 
ing, raffia work and basketry. 

Sophomore Class. 

1. (a). Pictorial Drawing. Composition, grouping of fruits and 
vegetables. Objects. Still life. 

(b). Design. 

2. Elementary Arts and Crafts. Mechanical drawing, leading 

52 



to practical work in cardboard and thin wood construction. Pot- 
tery. Basketry. Design, constructive and decorative in connection 
with every problem. 

Junior Class. 

1. Advanced Drawing in all mediums. Design, abstract and 
concrete. Blackboard illustration. Pose drawing. 

2. Elementary Woodwork. In connection with which working 
drawings and designs will be carefully considered for each article 
to be constructed. 

Design applied to the making of articles of household decoration. 
The making of block prints, stencils, etc., to be used for table scarf, 
curtain, bureau covers, etc. 

3. Art History. 

Senior Class. 

1. Advanced Course in Color. Design, abstract and applied. 

2. Architectural Drawing applied to the making of house plans. 
Blue prints. Color scheme for interiors. Woodwork. The con- 
struction of articles for home or school use. Working drawings to 
precede tool processes. 

3. History of Manual Arts. Discussion of school problems. 
Reading and study of current articles in magazines and books re- 
lating to the subject of manual arts. 

4. Practice Teaching under supervision. 



53 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 



MISS LURA B. STRONG. 
MISS TEXAS HENDERSON. 



Requirements. 



All students are required to take the work in Physical Education, 
which is two periods per week. No student is exempt from this 
work unless she brings an excuse from a reputable physician. 

Gymnasium Suits. 

Within two weeks after entrance each student must provide her- 
self a gymnasium suit, consisting of bloomers (black preferred), 
white blouse, and black tennis shoes. After this time no student 
will be allowed in the gymnasium unless this suit is worn. Price 
of suit will be about $3.00. 

Physical Examination. 

Twice a year, each student is given a careful physical examina- 
tion, with a view to correcting defects of the body, and to note the 
general health of the student, together with her physical develop- 
ment. The reports of these examinations are kept on file in the 
Physical Director's office and may be referred to at any time. 

Gymnasium Work. 

The work of this department consists of graded exercises in^ 
formal and general gymnastics, games, athletics, and other forms' 
of wholesome, harmless exercise, arranged for the physical wel- 
fare and development of the young women in the school. 

In the Senior class, normal work in regular class-room exercises 
is given. 

Certificate Course in Physical Education. 

A certificate in Physical Education will be granted those students 
who fulfill requirements for entrance to Junior year and complete 
required courses in Swedish, German and General Gymnastics; 
Psychology, History of Education, Child Study, Principles of Edu- 

54 



cation, Methods, Physiology, Hygiene, Practice Teaching, Expres- 
sion and Common School Music. 

Exact subjects required for a certificate to be determined by 
conference with the Director. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC. 



MISS GERTRUDE ELIZABETH WOOD. 
MISS BESSIE MARY HARDY. 
MRS. WM. BRUCE CARRIER. 
MRS. AGNES EBERHART. 
MISS JULIA McARTHUR. 
MRS. MARY LEE DAVIS. 



The Department of Music offers a course in Piano, Voice, Har- 
mony, Violin and Common School Music. The aim in this depart- 
ment is to prepare special teachers of music as well as to give the 
common school teacher a thorough knowledge of how to present 
the subject of music in the school-room. 

Review Class. 

Elements of Harmony. Syllables, musical terms, signatures, 
clefs, notation, rhythm, ear-training, sight-training, vocalization, 
chorus work. Major scales. 

Text: Primer. Modern Music Series. 

One period a week throughout 
the year. 

Freshman Class. 

Review technical work, chromatic syllables, chromatic scales, 
musical form, notation, musical dictation, sight-singing in two 
parts, ear-training, vocalization continued. Song work. 
Text: Book One, Modern Music Series. 

One period a week throughout 
the year. 

55 



Sophomore Class. 

Minor scales, orchestration, sight-singing in three parts, ad- 
vanced ear-training, musical history, musical dictation, vocaliza- 
tion, chorus work. 

Text: Book Two, Modern Music Series. 

One period a week throughout 
the year. 

Junior Class. 

Euharmonic scales, intervals, primary triads, methods for all 
grades, monotones, sight-singing in four parts, study of the opera, 
musical appreciation, chorus directing. Rote songs. 

Text: Gilchrist's Sight-singing, Book One, and Matthews' 
Musical History. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Senior Class. 

Intervals, augmented and diminished, secondary triads, practice 
teaching, harmonizing of a bass and of a melody, advanced sight- 
singing. Chorus work. 

Text: Gilchrist's Sight-singing, Book One. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Certificate Course in Common School Music. 

The aim of this certificate course is to specially prepare teachers 
for the supervision of music in the public schools of the state. 

Requirements for entrance: The student must complete the 
Freshman and Sophomore years or present credits for their equiv- 
alent and must have completed work in the piano department to 
the fifth grade. 

First Year. 

First Semester. . . Second Semester. 

Piano 2 Piano 2 

Voice 2 Voice 2 

English 3 English 3 

Common School Music 3 Common School Music 3 

Expression 4 Expression 4 

German or French 2 German or French 2 

Methods 2 Methods 2 

Physical Culture 2 Physical Culture 2 

Applied Harmony 2 Applied Harmony 2 

22 22 

56 



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Second Year. 

First Semester. . . Second Semester. 

Piano 2 Piano 2 

Voice 2 Voice 2 

French or German 2 French or German 2 

Common School Music 2 Common School Music 2 

Practice Teaching 4 Practice Teaching 4 

Conference 1 Conference 1 

Physical Culture 2 Physical Culture 2 

Expression 4 Expression 4 

Applied Harmony 1 Applied Harmony 1 

22 22 

Tuition for piano, voice, and harmony in the certificate course 
will be the same as for pupils of private voice and piano. 

The Department of Music offers a course of private instruction 
in Piano, Voice, Violin and Harmony. The year is divided into 
four terms, nine weeks each. Tuition payable in advance at time 
dormitory fee is due. Piano practice included. Tuition when once 
paid will not be refunded. 

Piano, two periods each week $10.75 per term. 

Voice, two periods each week 10.75 per term. 

Violin, two periods each week 9.00 per term. 

Harmony, two periods each week 9.00 per term. 

Voice. 

The course in Voice Culture includes proper placing of the voice, 
breath control, relaxation, phrasing, song interpretation, study of 
the best songs from old masters and modern composers, arias 
from oratorios and operas. 

Vocalizes: Marchesi, Sieber, Concone, Panofka, Randegger. 

COURSE OF STUDY FOR PIANO. 
Grade I and II. 

Matthews' Graded Course, grades 1 and 2; Kohler Op. 300, 
249, 151, 157; Gurlitt, Op. 228, 82 and 83; Bellair, Elements of 
Piano Technique on a Rhythmic Basis; Duvenow, Op. 176 and 
120; LeCouppey, Op. 17; Burgmuller, Op. 100; Kuhner, School of 
Etudes; Low, Teacher and Pupil; Williams, Op. 43; Schmitt, Pre- 
paratory Exercises; Kunz 200, Two Part Canons; Loeschhorn, 
Op. 52 and 65. 

Grade III and IV. 

Mason, Touch and Technic; Herz, Technical Exercises; Loesch- 
horn, Op. 66, 67 and 136; LeCouppey, Op. 20; Plaidy, Technical 

57 



Studies; Hasert, Op. 50; Czerny, Op. 849, 299 and 553; Kuhner, 
School of Etudes; Bertini, 50 Selected Studies; Concone, Op. 30; 
Heller, 50 Selected Studies; Doring, Op. 24; Bach, Short Preludes 
and Fugues, Two Part Inventions; Sonatinas by Bach, Beethoven, 
Clementi, Kuhlau, Haydn, Mozart, Mendelssohn, and others. 

Grade V and VI. 

Xwintscher, Technical Exercises; Czerny, Op. 740; Cramer, 
Moscheles, and Chopin, Etudes; Kullak, Octave Studies; Clementi, 
Gradus and Parnassum; Bach, Three Part Inventions; Sonatas by 
Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. 

Scales, arpeggio, and duet work will be given throughout the 
course, and pieces by the best composers will be used at the dis- 
cretion of the teacher. 

CERTIFICATE. 

A certificate will be granted in Piano, Voice, Violin and Harmony 
upon a satisfactory completion of the course as outlined. Students 
of Voice or Piano will be granted a certificate if they have com- 
pleted the Freshman and Sophomore years in the Normal depart- 
ment and have studied in this school two years, have had three 
years of common school music, one year of advanced harmony, 
one year of musical history and two years of German or French. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Course in Harmony. 

Elements of harmony, cadences, harmonizing melodies and bass, 
figured bass chords of seventh and resolutions, applied harmony, 
counterpoint, chord analysis, modulation, transposing. 

Text: Chadwick's Harmony; White's Harmony and Ear-train- 
ing. 

Two periods a week throughout 
the year. 

Course in Violin. 

Exercises for flexibility, violin technics and scale studies. Stu- 
dents will also receive instruction in ear-training and rudimentary 
theory. Pieces selected from the classic and modern violin liter- 
ature. 

Glee Clubs are organized for the students. All students are ex- 
pected to attend the monthly recitals of the department. 



58 



DEPARTMENT OF CORRESPONDENCE. 



MISS HELEN L. SPROUT, teacher in charge. 



Teaching by mail is becoming more popular every day, and the 
facilities have now been so perfected that there is no method of 
study which equals that of the correspondence plan for giving 
depth of scholarship and accurate knowledge of the subject studied. 
The State Normal School has so arranged its courses of study that 
all correspondence students will secure full credit for the work 
which they do at home should they decide eventually to attend the 
Normal School at Athens. 

These courses are prepared by the heads of departments who 
are specialists in these branches. Directions as to text-books and 
lessons, and lists of review questions, will be sent the student. 
When the student writes out the answers to these questions and 
sends in her papers, these will be corrected and graded and again 
returned to the student. Credit will be entered upon the records 
of the State Normal School for the work done, and this credit will 
help the student, who can come to the school later and take resi- 
dent work, to obtain the diploma offered by this institution. 

The charges for the courses are as follows: 

Common School Review Course. General Culture Courses. 

Arithmetic $5.00 Algebra $6.00 

Grammar 5.00 Geometry 6.00 

History 5.00 Latin 6.00 

Physiology 5.00 Rhetoric 6.00 

Geography 5.00 Literature 6.00 

Agriculture 5.00 Englsh History 6.00 

Reading 5.00 Ancient History 6.00 

Spelling 5.00 Civil Government 6.00 

General Pedagogical Courses. 

Dutton's "School Management," and Georgia School Law.... $5. 00 
A General Course on Primary Methods 5.00 

Other courses in way of preparation. 

For full particulars in regard to any of these Courses of Study, 
address JERE M. POUND, President, State Normal School, Athens, 
Georgia. 



59 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS. 



THE YOUNG .WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 



Advisory Board. 

Pres. E. C. Branson, Chairman. 
A. Rhodes, Treasurer. Miss Ida Young. 

F. A. Merrill. Miss Bessie Hardy. 

P. F. Brown. Miss Edna Randall. 

Miss Willie Fagan, General Secretary. 

Student Officers. 

President, Elizabeth Bounds. Secretary, C. B. Kelly. 

Vice-President, Mary Lamb. Treasurer, Louise Waller. 

Chairmen of Committees. 

Bible Study — Corinne Scott. 
Mission Study — Pearl Rainwater. 
Devotional — Annie Durham. 
Social — Frances Beach. 
Intercollegiate — Jannette Wallace. 



The Y. W. C. A., through its social life, Bible study, Mission 
study and intercollegiate relationships, seeks to promote a spirit 
of right living among students and to train them for Christian 
work. The social work consists of introducing new students to 
the school and of assisting them in adapting themselves to their 
new friends and surroundings. The Bible study course is arranged 
to cover four years, but if as much as two years is satisfactorily 
completed credit is given on the diploma issued by the school. 
This year 95 per cent, of the student body is enrolled. The course 
in Mission study is carefully planned and the text-books used are 
the newest and best, treating both home and foreign mission prob- 
lems. Intercollegiate relationships have been established by dele- 
gations to the Georgia State Missionary League, and the Southern 
Conference of the Young Women's Christian Association, by visits 
of traveling student secretaries and by the interchange of reports 
and methods with all the leading schools of the South. 

60 



WOMAN'S CHRISTIAN TEMPERANCE UNION. 

Officership. 

Advisor, Miss Ida Young. Secretary, Addie Frazer. 

President, Mary Ostermann. Treasurer, Jennie Kicklighter. 

Vice-President, Rosa Mercer. Cor. Secretary, Ruth Hodges. 



In conjunction with the other religious work of the school, there 
is an organized W. C. T. U. which holds regular meetings once a 
month. This organization has done much to further the study of 
temperance and temperance questions that are pertinent to school 
life. 



THE ALTIORIA LITERARY SOCIETY. 

Officership. 

President, Frances Beach. Secretary, Margaret Kendrick. 

Vice-President, Elizabeth Bounds. Critic, Sarah Young. 
Treasurer, C. B. Kelly. Censor, Lucile Gresham. 



For the seven years of its existence the Altioria Society, by fol- 
lowing its motto has, through its high standards in literary and 
social culture, through beautifying its room and through establish- 
ing a library, reached the state of being a permanent and neces- 
sary organization in the school. 

The course of study for 1912-13: Works of Charles Dickens, 
Parliamentary Law. 

Motto: Excelsior. 



THE MILDRED RUTHERFORD SOCIETY. 

Colors: .Blue and Gold Flower: .Forget-me-not. 

Motto: "To be rather than to seem." 



Officership. 



President, Annie Reid McGarity. Censor, Joyce Winn. 
Vice-President, Chester Daniell. Critic, Miriam Waters. 
Secretary, Clebe Kemph. Chaplain, Emmie Knott. 

Treasurer, Mary Lamb. 

President of Glee Club, Ethel Landrum. 

61 



The Mildred Rutherford Society is a literary society, the aims 
of which are the cultivation of the literary sense, the betterment 
of the social life of the school and the cementing of friendships 
into strong usefulness in the future. 



THE ALEXANDER ETIQUETTE CLUB. 



Officership. 



President, Anne Harris. Vice-President, Wren King. 

Secretary, Rosa Mercer. 



The Alexander Etiquette Club was organized for the purpose 
of pleasant social intercourse, for the study of pertinent questions 
of etiquette, and for the inculcation of a love of, and a striving 
for, the highest forms of courtesy, under all circumstances, and in 
all conditions of life. 



THE ROUND TABLE. 



The Round Table is a gathering of all the students who desire 
to attend at a regular meeting every Saturday night just when 
supper is over. The organization is eight years old and its aim 
is to furnish wholesome recreation and to develop a love for and 
a power to tell the best stories to be found in our literature. 
Current topics are discussed, songs rendered and some pleasing 
story told and commented on. This organization started with but 
six members at its inception, and now has increased in size until 
there is no room on the school campus that will hold the attendance 
without crowding. 



THE CICERONIAN DEBATING SOCIETY. 



Officership. 



C. J. Barnett, President. F. J. Ostermann, Chaplain. 

G. C. Watkins, Vice-President. G. C. Goble, Critic. 

C. V. Brown, Secretary. C. A. Rose, Sergeant-at-Arms. 

62 



The Ciceronian Debating Society is an organization of the young 
men for the specific purpose of training them in debate and public 
speaking. Regular meetings are held once a week when current 
topics of vital interest are debated and declamations rendered. In 
addition to the benefits derived from public speaking, the young 
men are given considerable insight into parliamentary usage by 
occasional lectures. All of which prepares the members for duties 
in after life. 



THE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION. 



Officership. 



President, Mildred Wood. 
Secretary, Le Verne Nelson. 
Treasurer, Eunice Galphin. 



This is an association of the students of the school for the pur- 
pose of athletic training and is under the direct supervision of the 
Department of Physical Culture. The Association has an athletic 
field well equipped with six tennis courts, two basket-ball courts 
and room for track and relay races. An annual Field Day and 
championship tennis contests are held; the winners of the young 
men's tournament are sent to the Inter-collegiate tournament in 
Atlanta. 



THE GEORGIA CLUB. 



E. C. BRANSON, Leader. 






Three years ago the Georgia Club began its work. At that 
time it was a new and unique organization in the State Normal 
School; but also it was new and unique in the schools, colleges and 
universities of the whole country. 

Since the opening of the school last September, nearly forty 
other schools, Colleges, Agricultural Colleges, Normal Schools, and 
Universities have organized Know-Your-Home-State Clubs. These 
clubs are scattered from Vermont to California. The letter files 
of the club contain inquiries for directions and instructions from 
almost every state in the union. 

C3 



The club numbers 216 students and faculty members, represents 
94 counties and five states. It meets regularly on Mondays at 
nine o'clock for an hour's informal, comfortable discussion of rural 
life. 

Meanwhile students or county groups of students are drawing 
ten-year balance sheets for their home counties. Each county is 
compared with itself during the census decade so as to show how 
it has moved forward or dropped to the rearward. Each county 
is also ranked with every other county in the state. 

These county studies sometimes occupy a student or a student 
group for months. The work not only involves the searching of 
accumulated records in the club headquarters, but also large cor- 
respondence with well-informed people in the home counties. 

Each county passes under review in the following particulars: 
(1) location, surface, soils and resources; (2) population and occu- 
pations; (3) farms: ownership and tenancy; (4) farm indebted- 
ness; (5) industries and wealth; (6) negro property ownership; 
(7) farm animals; (8) crops; (9) home-raised feed and food stuffs; 
(10) schools; 11) roads and bridges; (12) health and sanitation; 
(13) church life. 

So far fifty-nine county surveys have been completed and pub- 
lished in the county newspapers. In some instances the county 
authorities have published the county reports in booklet form for 
general distribution. In this way the reports become a sort of 
text-book of information about the county, for thorough study by 
the farmers and business people, the teachers and school authori- 
ties, the doctors and ministers of the county. These county reports 
are fact-searching, heart-searching documents. They attempt to 
show and they do show the necessity for sympathetic federation of 
rural life forces in every county. The club is not compiling his- 
torical records; it is generating social steam. 

A common result is organized effort for better schools, more and 
better Sunday schools, more influential country churches, improved 
public highways, and attention to home, school, and public sanita- 
tion. 

There are 197 non-resident affiliated members of the club; judges, 
lawyers, club women, teachers, county school commissioners, farm- 
ers, preachers — a great variety of people who are genuinely and 
generously interested in the well-being and progress of their coun- 
ties. They look after the publication of these reports in the home 
newspapers, the publication of them as county bulletins, and the 
reading and discussion of them everywhere throughout the counties. 

It is a little strange that it should have been left for the State 
Normal School to discover that the home is a proper curriculum 
study; that students in a state institution ought to come into 

64 




Scenes Ar.< >ut Athenj 



Scene ox Campus 




A Japanese Opbrett \ 



familiar, loving acquaintance with their mother state and home 
counties while learning about far-away Greece and Rome; that it 
ought to be the business of every state institution to know thor- 
oughly the state it was created to serve; that it ought to be the 
business of some teacher or some department to assemble from 
every direction accurate information about the state and the 
counties of it, and to become a clearing-house of exact information 
about the state. 

It was left for the State Normal School to build a department 
upon the idea of Know-Your-Home-State. However, the idea seems 
self-propagative. Dean Edward K. Graham of the University of 
North Carolina, at Chapel Hill, speaks of it as "the finest move- 
ment that has been set on foot in any college in this country." 
Other schools and colleges are organizing clubs and establishing 
departments based upon a study of the home state as a worthy 
and valuable source of information and preparation for usefulness. 



NORMAL GLEE CLUB. 



Colors: Blue and White. Flower: Fern. 

Motto. 

"The man that hath no music in himself is fit for treasons, strat- 
agems, and spoils." 



Officers. 



Director — Miss Gertrude E. Wood. 
Accompanist — Miss Bessie M. Hardy. 
President — LeVerne Nelson. 
Secretary — Mamie Lou Oxford. 
Librarian — Texas Henderson. 



Allen, Chloe. Crew, Maude. 

Andrews, Mrs. Edith. Dolan, Ada Jane. 

Bowden, Brooksie. Ellington, Vohammie. 

Barrett, Edna. . Elliot, Fairie. 

Brackett, Mittie. Frankum, Caroline. 

Braswell, Ruby. Fraser, Addie. 

Callaway, Ellie. Guill, Alma. 

Collier, Lona. Grubbs, lone. 

65 



Henderson, Texas. 
Highsmith, Dollie. 
Johnson, Callie. 
Kinnebrew, Nanaline. 
Kitchen, Mrs. Lily. 
Kilgore, Mattie. 
Knott, Emmie. 
Knox, Kathleen. 
Linder, Narcissa. 
Morris, Sarah. 



McKenzie, Edla. 
McDaniel, Lily. 
Nelson, LeVerne. 
Ostermann, Byrdie. 
Oxford, Mamie Lou. 
Philbrick, Mary. 
Philbrick, Hazel. 
Porter, Ruby. 
Pittard, Roberta. 
Smith, Susie. 



ALTIORIA GLEE CLUB. 



Officers. 

President — Addie Fraser. 
Secretary — Rosa Mercer. 
Director — Miss Gertrude E. Wood. 



Barnett, Bonnie Kate. 
Beach, Frances. 
Barrett, Edna. 
Bowden, Brooksie. 
Bowles, Velma. 
Cubbege, Grace. 
Cubbege, Marion. 
Dickert, Mamie. 
Dolan, Ada Jane. 
Ellington, VoHammie. 
Fraser, Addie. 
Galphin, Eunice. 
Gresham, Lucile. 
Hensler, Claudia. 
Hicks, Irma. 
Hughes, Estelle. 
Hussey, Annie. 
Hussey, Clara Mae. 
Kelley, C. B. 
King, Wren. 
Kicklighter, Jennie. 
Knox, Kathelen. 
Linder, Narcissa. 



Mann, Winnie. 
Mercer, Rosa. 
Morris, Sarah. 
McKenzie, Edla. 
Nelson, LeVerne. 
Nelson, Mabel. 
Newman, Dora. 
Ostermann, Byrdie. 
Patton, Iverson. 
Roberts, May. 
Rudisill, Willie. 
Scott, Corinne. 
Sloan, Timoxena. 
Stanley, Alma. 
Tribble, Lula. 
Ward, Elizabeth. 
Wells, Dollie. 
Wash, Esther. 
Whittenberg, Willouise. 
Wright, Sarah. 
Young, Sarah. 
Young, Augusta. 



66 



YOUNG MEN'S GLEE CLUB. 



Officers. 



President — J. G. Morris. 
Vice-President — C. J. Barnett. 
Secretary— W. E. Taylor. 
Treasurer — F. J. Ostermann. 



Allgood, R. E. Hardman, W. W. 

Braswell, R. A. Goble, G. C. 

Brown, C. V. Watkins, G. C. 

Cole, J. W. Rose, A. 

Dellinger, S. E. Crowley, E. Z. 



67 



\ 



1 







GRADUATE STUDENTS. 

The following schools are this year represented by graduates in 
the student body of the State Normal School: Banks-Stephens 
Institute, Butler Male and Female College, Florida Normal College, 
Gordon Institute, Glynn Academy, Georgia Normal College & Bus- 
iness Institute, John Means Institute, Knoxville Summer School, 
Lucy Cobb Institute, Luthersville Institute, Muscogee Elementary 
School, Martin Institute, Miss Hanna's School, McPhail Institute, 
Perry Rainey Institute, Presbyterial Institute, Reinhardt College, 
Samuel Benedict Memorial School, Seventh District Agricultural 
School, South Atlantic Institute, St. Vincent's Academy, States- 
boro Institute, Third District Agricultural School, Tugalo Institute, 
Tenth District Agricultural School, Eleventh District Agricultural 
School; and the High Schools of Adrian, Acworth, Albany, Ameri- 
cus, Ararat, Arlington, Armuchee, Athens, Bronwood, Buford, 
Cataula, Chattahochee, Climax, Cochran, Comer, Conyers, Colum- 
bus, Crawford, Dublin, Eatonton, Fayetteville, Fitzgerald, Fort 
Gaines, Gainesville, Girard, Greensboro, Gresham, Griffin, Hephzi- 
bah, Hoschton, Hartwell, Jesup, LaGrange, Lawrenceville, Livings- 
ton, Loganville, Lumber City, Madison, Marshallville, Maysville, 
McDonough, Monroe, Monticello, Oconee, Perry, Pinehurst, Quit- 
man, Reynolds, Rome, Rutledge, Sandersville, Salem, Savannah, 
Sparta, Statham, Sylvania, Thomasville, Thornwell, Tifton, Una- 
dilla, Villa Rica, Waycross, Washington, Wesley Chapel, Whigham, 
Winder, Winterville, Woodbury, Wynnton, Estherville (Iowa), 
Sumter (S. C.) 



STATISTICS FOR 1912-1913. 

Students registered to date (March 25, 1913) 559; pupils in 
Muscogee Elementary School and Country School, 181; total, 740; 
applicants turned away for lack of room, 125; teachers and offi- 
cers, 48; counties represented by students, 111; students holding 
diplomas from other schools, 181; students holding first-grade 
license, 61; second-grade license, 83; third-grade license, 38; stu- 
dents having experience in teaching, 143; students who earned 
the money they spend here, 123. Nearly fifty per cent of all our 
students are the sons and daughters of farmers. Calls on us for 
teachers, 1912-1913, 138. Total registration since the founding of 
the school, 10,557, more than ninety per cent of whom have since 
taught in our common schools. Total graduates to June, 1912, 679. 
Graduating class this year numbers 78. 

BUILDINGS: Academic buildings, 3; Dormitory buildings, 3; 
Dining Hall and Senior Hall buildings, 1; Carnegie Library, 1; 
Infirmary, 1; dairy barn, 1. Total 10. 

68 



ROLL OF STUDENTS, SESSION 1912-13. 



Senior Class. 



Allen, Frances, Rockdale 

Balkcom, Inez Quitman 

Bannester, Lucile, Richmond 

Barnett, Bornie Kate, Murray 

• Beach, Frances, Glynn 
Bowden, Brooksie, Meriwether 

Brackett, Mittie, Jackson 

Brady, Ella, Sumter 

Branch, Elizabeth, Oconee 

Brantley, Jillie, Screven 

Brey, Mrs. Mell F., Clarke 

Brown, Emily, Hancock 

Bryant, Lucy Logan, Fulton 

Burruss, Leah, Franklin 

Carter, Helen, Cobb 

Clark, Annie Maude, Dodge 

Collier, Lurline, Jackson 

Crew, Maude, Morgan 

Crovatt, Eva E., Thomas 

Daughtry, Jennie, Bibb 

Davant, Hortense, Taylor ' 

L_ Dolan, Ada Jane, Muscogee 

Durham, Annie M., Greene 

Findley, Nebraska, Milton 

Fraser, Addie, Liberty 

Fulwood, Bertha, Taylor 

Garland, Annie, Stephens 

Gillen, Ruby, Clarke . 

Gresham, Lucile, Wilkes 

Guill, Alma, Hancock 

Guill, Edith, Hancock 

Harris, Annie Laura, Hart 

Harrison, Lona May, Jackson 

Harrison, Thurza, Twiggs 

Holbrook, Ruby, Franklin 

Holliday, Mary, Jackson 

Home, Laura, Baldwin 

Hubbard, Cora, Dawson 



Hughes, Estelle, Floyd 

Jackson, Ella, Crisp 

Johnson, Estelle, Oglethorpe 

Kennedy, Ruby, Clarke 

Kidd, Alia, Webster 

Kilgore, Allene, Jackson 

King, Wren, Rabun 

Knox, Kathleen, Telfair 

McEvoy, Louise, Clarke 

■^McGarity, Annie Reid, Jackson 

Malcom, Eula, Oconee 

Martin, Beulah, Clarke 

Mason, Emily E., Clarke 

-Meadow, Ruth, Oglethorpe 

Mercer, Rosa, Jones 

Moore, Lillian R., Jackson 

Morris, Sarah, Fulton 

Nelson, LeVerne, Bibb 

Osterman, Mary, Charlton 

•^Osterman, F. J., Charlton 

Oxford, Mamie L., Morgan 

Prater, Rosa Lee, Clarke 

Rainwater, Pearl, Wilcox 

Reid, Tassie, Haralson 

Rudisill, Willie, Dougherty 

Salmon, Ruth, Floyd 

Scott, Corinne, Cobb 

^Snellings, Irene, Elbert 

Spears, Grace, Madison 

Speights, Alice, Baldwin 

Stansell, Lucile, Rockdale 

Stone, Margaret, Clarke 

Talton, Laura, Houston 

Thomas, Ruth, Morgan 

Usher, Floy, Screven 

Usher, Jennie, Screven 

Vickery, May, Lincoln 

Wade, Maggie, Brooks 



69 



Wallis, Pearl, Forsyth / v Woolvin, Tilly, 

Whittenberg, Willouise, DeKalb 



Wilcox 



' Adams, Eleanor, 
Mott, Foy, 
Neisler, Mary E., 



One Year Elective Class. 

Putnam Newman, Mrs. Huldah McG., 
Sumter Chatham 

Taylor 



Junior Class. 



/- 



Akin, Eunice, Franklin 

Bankston, Evelyn R., Pike 

Bass, Annie, Floyd 

Baugh, Ellie M., Putnam 

Berry, Addie, Oglethorpe 

Blackstock, Myrtle, Floyd 

Bowles, Velma, Meriwether 

Branan, Mattilu, Putnam 

^B^swell, -Rubyj — Walton 

Brooks, Carrie Bell, Muscogee 
Brown, C. V., Douglas 

Brown, Effie, Lincoln 

-Campbell, Myrtle, Gwinnett 

Cadwell, Beryl, Wilcox 

Cape, Cora, Pickens 

Carney, Maudeen E., Floyd 

- Castellow, Freddie May, Early 
Cawthon, Ida W., Greene 

Clarke, Mattie Lee, Clarke 

Coats, Helen A., Chatham 

Coile, Nezzie, Oglethorpe 

Colley, Katherine T., Wilkes 



^Galphin, Eunice, 
Goble, G. C, 



Richmond 
Gilmer 
Jackson 
Oglethorpe 
Gwinnett 
Decatur 
Lincoln 
Polk 
Tatnall 
Effingham 
Troup 



Collier, Lona, 


Floyd 


Conaway, Prentiss, 


Clarke 


Copeland, Bessie H., 


Chatham 


Cox, Etta, 


Cherokee 


i Crju-mp, Orsenie", 


Franklin 


/ Cubbedge, Grace C, 


Screven. 


Daniel, Chester Ruth 


, Cobb 


Daniel, Julia, 


Jackson 


Davis, May Belle, 


Taliaferro 


Dixon, Ora Lee, 


Burke 


- Drinkard, Ruby, 


Lincoln 


Floyd, Olivia, 


Troup 



J. Hamilton, Lena, 

Hargrove, Ellen, 
^ Hawthorne, Dollie, 

Herring, Bettie L., 

Hester, Nell, 

Hicks, Irma, 
*- Highsmith, Dollie, 
I Hodges, Ruth, 
; Hogg, Jessie, 
, Hollingsworth, Mary Lucy, 

Newton 
^Ivey, Sudie Belle, 

Jennings, Lizzie M., 
'-Johnson, Bertha, 

Jones, Nannie, 

Jones, Nora, 
<- Kendrick, Margaret, Chattooga 
< ! Kicklighter, Jennie, Tattnall 
- Kilgore, Mattie, 
-' Knott, Emmie, 
* Lamb, Mary, 
. Landrum, Ethel, 

McGee, Ella Marie, 

Martin, Gertrude, 

Moore, Jessie, 

Moore, Minnie, 

Moore, Willie, 

Murphey, Bessie, 

Murphey, Marie E., 

Nelson, Mabel, 

Newton, Hattie R., 



Newton 

Walton 

McDuffie 

Grady 

Colquitt 



Carroll 

Morgan 

Pulaski 

Franklin 

Crawford 

Clarke 

Clarke 

Jackson 

Grady 

Floyd 

Richmond 

Bibb 

Screven 



■iNicholson, Emma Sue, Oconee 



70 



Norris, Lee, 


Morgan 


Sullivan, Bernice, 


Franklin 


Odom, Alma, 


Burke 


Sullivan, Ovis, 


Franklin 


> Paine, Rebecca, 


Clarke 


Tanner, Susie, 


Gwinnett 


Penland, Anna May, 


Clarke 


Taylor, W. E., 


Milton 


>Peterman, Ida May, 


Mitchell 


7 Terrell, Mary, 


Grady 


Peterson, Lillie, 


Jackson 


Thurmand, Winnie, 


Lincoln 


> Porter, Ruby May, 


Jackson 


Tribble, Lula, 


Monroe 


J? Pound, Cora, 


Jasper 


'' Vance, Carolyn, 


Gwinnett 


-> Pound, Emmie E., 


Jasper 


"Walker, Veazey, 


Greene 


> Pounds, Winona, 


Crisp 


Wallace, Jeanette, 


Taylor 


-' Powell, Lizzie, 


Lincoln 


Waller, Louise, 


Hancock 


> Quarterman, Louise, 


Oconee 


Wash, Esther, 


Clay 


> Reeves, Velma, 


Meriwether 


/Watkins, G. C, 


Talbot 


^ Sands, Ethelene, 


Harris 


j Wells, Dollie, Montgomery 


Saye, Mattie, 


Morgan 


West, Clara, 


Taylor 


? Simpson, Marie, 


Greene 


Wingfield, Edith, 


Clarke 


S Smith, Bertha, 


Talbot 


A Young, Sarah, 


Polk 




Two Year Elective Class. 




Baker, Lucile, 


Spalding 


Linder, Narcissa, 


Twiggs 


Bales, Mary E., 


Laurens 


> McDaniel, Lillie, 


Laurens 


y Bethea, Susie E., 


Greene 


McKenzie, Edla, 


Macon 


Bounds, Elizabeth, 


Wilkes 


■ Mason, Regina, 


Clarke 


' Brunner, Mary, 


Bibb 


Moore, Odessa, 


Jackson 


Callaway, Ellie, 


Clarke 


^ Newnan, Dora, 


Dougherty 


Cofer, Stella, 


DeKalb 


- Olmstead, Mary, 


Liberty 


Davis, Essie, 


Clarke 


Pittard, Roberta, 


Clarke 


Davis, Mattie Lou, 


Jackson 


J Rumph, Lois, 


Glynn 


Ellington, Vo Hammie, Wilkes 


Sisk, Evie A., 


Clarke 


Fuss, Margaret M., 


Bibb 


9 Sloan, Timoxena, Macon (N. C.) 


Glenn, Gladys, 


Clarke 


Smith, Marie, 


Greene 


Griffith, Clara, 


Clarke 


Smith, Nellie, 


Hall 


Haddock, Nancy E., 


Clarke 


Stoffregen, Lula, 


Floyd 


7 Heath, Thelma, 


Warren 


Tharpe, Janie, 


Thomas 


Hensler, Claudia, 


Walton 


Wallace, Myrtle, 


Jackson 


■r Jones, Linda, 


Ben Hill 


. Ward, Adelaide, 


Pierce 


Kelly, Emily, 


Clarke 


Wilkins, Annie, 


Ware 


Kemph, Clebe Mers, 


Sumter 


Wood, Mildred, 


Jones 




Sophomore Class. 




Allgood, Roy E., 


Paulding 


Bonner, Minnie C, 


Lincoln 


Anderson, Ethel, 


Jackson 


Brewster, Laura Bell 


e, Polk 


Barnett, C. T., 


Oconee 


Brooks, Mattie Lucy, 


Carroll 


Bickerstaff, Mary, 


Lee (Ala.) 


Brown, Ruth, 


Murray 



71 



Callaway, Jennie Mae, Clarke 


McCorkle, Anna, 


Clarke 


Callaway, Rebecca, 


Wilkes 


Mann, Winnie A., 


Meriwether 


Chafin, Lovejoy, 


Oglethorpe 


Michael, Kathleen, 


Morgan 


Clark, Mary Etta, 


Oglethorpe 


Moody, Mabel, 


Greene 


Cole, J. W., 


Paulding 


Moore, Lillian C, 


Wilkes 


Cowley, Daisy, 


Fulton 


Osterman, Birdie, 


Charlton 


Cronic, Mayrelle, 


Jackson 


Parker, Ella Louisej 


Screven 


Crowley, Ernest, 


Paulding 


Parrish, Mary, 


Bulloch 


Cubbege, Frances M. 


, Effingham 


Patton, Minnie I., 


Fulton 


Dailey, S. R., 


Paulding 


Peavey, Delia Mae, 


Dooly 


Davis, Frances, 


Clarke 


Perry, Dollbabe, 


Laurens 


Davis, Lucile, 


Newton 


Perry, Ruth, 


Gilmer 


Davis, Ruth, 


Clarke 


Philbrick, Mary H., 


Habersham 


Dellinger, S. E., 


Gordon 


Pickett, lone M., Surry (S. C.) 


Doughterty, Annie, 


Wilcox 


Rainwater, Cleo, 


Wilcox 


Downer, Henry Etta 


, Clarke 


Rivers, Lee Ethel, 


Clarke 


Dudley, Effie Lee, 


Clarke 


Rose, Alva, 


Paulding 


Durham, Rebecca, 


Greene 


Sinyard, Gordon, 


Paulding 


Frankum, Caroline, 


Franklin 


Smith, Elizabeth, 


Meriwether 


Groves, Myrtle, 


Lincoln 


Smith, Susie Ellen, 


Pike 


Hannon, Edward, 


Sumter 


Snelson, Annette, 


Monroe 


Hardman, Wallace, 


Oglethorpe 


Story, Evelyn, 


Houston 


Hewell, Ruby, 


Oglethorpe 


Summer, Mattie Vie ; 


, Coweta 


Hicks, Ruth, 


Polk 


Trammell, Nellie, 


Coweta 


Holliman, Ruby E., 


Clarke 


Tyson, Lucile, 


Chatham 


Hughes, Kittie, 


Clarke 


Weaver, Jeffie, 


Walton 


Hunter, Frances M., 


Clarke 


Winn, Joyce E., 


Oconee 


Hutchins, Husie Ellen, Gwinnett 


Wood, Lillie Mae, 


Walton 


Jackson, Martha, 


Clarke 


Wright, Bernice, 


Lincoln 


Johnson, Annie Lee, 


Sumter 


Wright, Sarah Anne 


5, Elbert 


Jones, Agnes, 


Chattooga 


Young, Augusta, 


Polk 


Kelly, Miss C. B., 


Jasper 


Young, Elon, 


Coweta 


Lambert, Julia, 


Clarke 


Zeiglar, Tempie, 


Screven 


Livingston, Leila, 


Newton 








Freshman Class. 




Alexander, Lucile A 


., DeKalb 


Burk, Nina, 


Floyd 


Asbury, Mary Lou 


Greene 


Burson, Susan Marie Clarke 


Andrews, Ruth, 


Clarke 


Barrett, Ruth, 


Clarke 


Brackett, Bertha, 


Jackson 


Carlton, Belle 


Walton 


Braswell, Reuben A 


., Gwinnett 


Colquitt, Susie, 


Oglethorpe 


Bray, Dott, 


Oglethorpe 


Crowley, Ada Belle 


Fulton 


Brunner, Hattie, 


Bibb 


Crawford, Lottie Alberta, 


Burk, Bertha, 


Floyd 




Clarke 



72 




v. 

- 



Cronic, Irene, 


Jackson 


Mann, Pattie T., 


Meriwether 


Dickert, Nannie Eliz., Bibb 


Meadow, Stella, 


Oglethorpe 


DuBose, Susie, 


Habersham 


Miller, Bessie, 


Newton 


Eidson, Sara Rebecca, 


Milton, Annette, 


Pierce 




Oglethorpe 


Norris, Lee, 


Morgan 


Franks, Eula Lee, 


Floyd 


Pendland, Ruby, 


Clarke 


Fuller, Dessie, 


Gordon 


Petty, Jewell, 


Gwinnett 


Gillen, Lois, 


Clarke 


Reed, Edna, 


Early 


Graham, Claude, 


Oglethorpe 


Roberts, Mary, 


Jones 


Hill, Freddie Viola, 


Baldwin 


Roberts, Odessa, 


Jones 


Holley, Viola, 


Richmond 


Speight, Lila, 


Baldwin 


Iverson, Elberta, 


Clarke 


Stiles, Caroline Etta, Baldwin 


Jackson, Daisy, 


Coweta 


Stynchcomb, Pauline 


, Clarke 


Jackson, Maude, 


Crisp 


Thomas, Annie Maud, 


Kendrick, Clara, 


Fulton 




Oglethorpe 


Kinard, Wyoleen, 


Jasper 


Towler, Sallie Bush 


, Walton 


Logan, Maude, 


Jackson 


Waiter, Blanche, 


Cobb 


Lunceford, Floy, 


Wilkes 


Whatley, Victoria, 


Taylor 


McClain, Cassie, 


Morgan 


Whitehead, Jessie, 


Clarke 


McKoy, Nannie, 


Coweta 


Witcher, Lucy, 


Coweta 


Mann, Eddie Ruth, 


Greene 


Wyndham, Belva, 


Chatham 




Review Class. 




Brown, Gladys, 


Madison 


Martin, Lura, 


Clay 


Dickey, Irene, 


Pickens 


O'Conner, Katherine, 


i Glynn 


Elliott, Fairy, 


Clarke 


Ritchie, Virginia, 


Habersham 


Evans, Annie M., 


Dodge 


Smith, Nannie, 


Emanuel 


Hardman, Pearl, 


Madison 


Stevens, Lucy, 


Clarke 


Hussey, Clara Mae, 


Oconee 


Waggoner, Hattie Sue, Madison 


McAfee, Rubie 0., 


Crisp 


Wynne, Marion, 


Ware 


Martin, Etherbel, 


Clay 








Half Year Review Class. 




Anderson, Judson, 


Toombs 


Brewton, Anna, 


Tattnall 


Anderson, Ollie, 


Toombs 


Brinson, Annie E., 


Tattnall 


Arnold, Viola, 


Jackson 


Brown, Golden, 


Madison 


Bankston, Julia A., 


Fulton 


Brown, Wylene, 


Putnam 


Barnett, Lollie, 


Jackson 


Burson, Viola, 


Jackson 


Bearden, Kate, 


Jasper 


Bowden, Nora P., 


Newton 


Bell, Alieen, 


Madison 


Clegg, Minnie, 


Walton 


Bexley, Idelia, 


Coweta 


Collier, Jessie E., 


Pike 


Bland, Marie, 


Bulloch 


Cowart, Eva, 


Terrell 


Bond, Lexye, 


Elbert 


Crawford, Marceline, 


Clarke 



73 



Clark, H. L., DeKalb 

Collins, Vera, Early 

Dickerson, Abbie, Bulloch 

Eavenson, Mearle, Elbert 

Forehand, Estelle, Screven 

Gaines, Clara, Hart 

Garland, Lillian, Hancock 

Gill, Eugenia, Pike 

Greer, Stella, Newton 

Hall, Willie, Gwinnett 

Hall, Kate, Wayne 
Hankinson, Florence, Screven 

Harris, Ella Cleo, Warren 

Hollaway, Pearl, Bulloch 
Howard,. J H., Meriwether 
Hutchings, Sallie Lou, Hancock 
Harrison, Rilla, Washington 

Heath, Louise, Bibb 
Holliman, Olive Lee, Wilkinson 

Jones, Ella, Muscogee 

Jacobs, Rubye A., Gwinnett 

Kerlin, Ruth, Clarke 

Kimbrough, Sarah Houston 

Kitchen, Cynthia, Emanuel 

Knight, Walter, Gwinnett 

Landrum, Kate, Fayette 

LaPrade, Emma, Wilkes 

Lariscy, Atys A., Screven 

Lowe, Sallie, Jackson 
Lutes, Kathleen Daisy, Screven 

Lyle, Morvin, Elbert 

Locke, Arah, Taylor 

McBride, Vennie, Muscogee 

McKee, Thomas T., DeKalb 

McRee, Annie M., Early 

Mason, Cora Ellen, Campbell 



Miller, Louise, Bibb 

Moore, Bertie, Elbert 

Moore, Lessie, Elbert 

Mize, Bessie, Clarke 

Morris, J. G., Campbell 

Nunn, Clara, Houston 

Owens, Susie, Milton 

Perry, Gertrude, Burke 

Perry, Virginia L., Fayette 

Pickens, Rebuen P., Gwinnett 

Raines, Delia Mae, Crisp 

Rehberg, Lilla, Grady 

Roberts, May, Quitman 

Sims, V. A., Walton 

Slayton, Ethel, Harris 

Smalley, Orie Belle, Lincoln 
Smith, Blanche, Oglethorpe 
Snow, Elizabeth, Meriwether 

Still, Mozelle, Walton 

Sweet, Kate A., Clarke 

Tyner, Willie, Jones 

Urquhart, Ruth, Marion 

Waters, Lucile, Bulloch 

Waters, Ella, Bulloch 

Williams, Elizabeth, Bulloch 

Williams, Kittie, Bulloch 

Wilson, Winnie Davis, Morgan 

Wicker, Laura, Macon 

Wilson, Annabel, Early 

Wilson, Verna Mae, Dooly 
Woodruff, Lucile, Meriwether 

Woodward, Linna, Gwinnett 

Wall, Maggie Mae, Randolph 

Whitworth, Guy, Clarke 

Woodrum, Emeline, Bulloch 

Yates, Myrtle, Carroll 



One Year Certificate Class. 



Barnett, C. T., Fulton 

Bell, K. S., Paulding 

Bright, Clara, Henry 

Carpenter, Juanita, Ware 

Dickinson, Annie May Troup 
Garner, Ruth B., Polk 



Grubbs, lone, Spalding 

McKee, M. W., DeKalb 

Murray, Madeline, Morgan 

Porterfield, Jewell, Madison 

Sharley, Mrs. Ruby S., Randolph 
Tabor, Eunice, Gilmer 



74 



Special Students. 



Armstrong, Mary 


Ella, Pike 


Kinnebrew, Nannie May, 


Ashe, Louise, 


Richmond 


Clarke 


Baker, Emoline S., 


Hancock 


Martin, Louise, Jackson 


Bowers, Julia, 


Muscogee 


Morgan, Margaret, Sumter 


DeLoach, Julia, 


Fulton 


O'Farrell, Aurelia C, Clarke 


Fleming, Lois, 


Clarke 


O'Farrell, Kathleen, Clarke 


Harbin, May, 


Clarke 


Philbrick, Hazel, Habersham 


Harper, Launa, 


Oconee 


Quillian, Lena, Clarke 


Hart, Dorothy, 


Clarke 


Rousseau, Emma, Tift 


Harty, Genevieve, 


Chatham 


Saunders, Emily, Chattahoochee 


Henley, Hiram C, 


Clarke 


Stanley, Alma, Washington 


Hitt, Maudlyn, 


Sumter 


Stokes, Sarah, Clarke 


Hodgson, Ruth, 


Clarke 


Turner, Mary F., Troup 


Johnson, Callie F., 


Gilmer 


Williams, Kate, Morgan 



Irregular Students. 



Andrews, Mrs. Edith, Clarke 
Arnold, Marie, Oglethorpe 



Bower, Ianthia, 


Decatur 


Brownlee, Bessie, 


Morgan 


Barrett, Edna, 


Cobb 


Cape, Madie, 


Pickens 


Crawford, Bertha, 


Franklin 


Chandler, Carl N., 


Madison 


Davis, Maude, 


Clarke 


Dudley, W. M., 


Clarke 


Dickerson, Ella, 


Grady 


Edwards, Mattie '. 


Lou, 




Oglethorpe 


Ellison, Dessa, 


Fayette 


Findley, Annie, 


Toombs 


Freeman, Lillian, 


Webster 


Gilman, Pearle, 


Baldwin 


Haynie, Mary, 


Oglethorpe^ 


Highnote, Ruby, 


Marion 


Hussie, Annie, 


Oconee 


Henderson, Texas, 


Bibb 


Hutchins, Laura Cobb, Clarke 


Hilley, Maude, 


Cobb 


Johnson, Aliene, 


Bartow 



Jackson, Mollie, Crisp 

Kinnebrew, Naneline, Clarke 

Kitchen, Mrs. Lillie, Worth 

McGibony, Florrye, Greene 

McKemie, Courtney, Troup 

McLeroy, Ruth L., Clarke 

McFarland, Eva E., Talbot 

Mathews, Lucy F., Campbell 

Paine, Catherine, Clarke 

Perry, Emma, Laurens 

Roberts, .Florine, Jones 

Roper, Myrtle, Cherokee 

Rogers, Florence, Greene 

Scudder, Mozelle, Clarke 

Smith, Mary, Pike 

Spinks, Kathryn, Greene 

Thomasson, Frank, Carroll 

Thompson, Pearl, Wayne 

Waters, Lula, Bulloch 

Waters, Miriam, Bulloch 

Whelchel, Blanche, Hall 

Wilson, Adeline, Morgan 

Ward, Elizabeth, Troup 



75 



TRAINING SCHOOL. 

ROLL OF STUDENTS, SESSION 1912-13. 



First Grade. 



Brooks, A. L. 
Bondurant, Mary 
Conway, Royce 
Cartledge, Cleveland 
Callaway, Blanche 
Callaway, Helen 
Deadwyler, Thurston 
Deadwyler, Hugh 
Davis, Clower 
Haddock, Claudia 
Jackson, G. 0. 
Johnson, Juanita 
Jennings, Margaret 



Kenney, Dorothy 
Kinnebrew, Ruth 
Moon, Fred 
Maddox, Leon 
Mygatt, Ethei 
Orr, Douglas 
Pressnell, Georgia 
Vaugn, Hal 
Whittle, Albert 
Waldrep, James 
Waldrep, Brantley 
Whitworth, Lillie 
Waters, Madeline 



X 



Second Grade. 



Born, Jack 
Booth, Harvey 
Bomar, Leland 
Chasteen, Lettie May 
Cartledge, Thomas 
Conway, Clarice 
Drake, Asa 
Earnest, Lewis 
Jennings, Pattie 
Johnson, Nina 



Kitchen, John 
Lawrence, Genevieve 
Mygatt, Rufch 
Orr, Fritz 
Parham, Alfred 
Smith, J. B. 
Talmadge, Coke 
Waff, Howard 
Wardlaw, Donald 
Whitworth, Zelma 







Third Grade. 



Callaway, Luke 
Davis, Eudoxus 
Huff, Hollis 
Hughes, Mildred 
Jackson, Lenira 
Kenney, Lawrence 
Moore, Anna 



McLeroy, Geneva 
Orr, Donald 
Presnell, Clara 
Slaughter, Fain 
Simms, Marion 
Talmadge, Charles 
Waldrep, Kathleen 



"j 



76 



Fourth Grade. 



Allen, Grace 
Burney, Robert 
Barrett, Horace 
Conway, Cora 
Cartledge, Sam 
Chasteen, Earnest 
Drake, Daisy 
Gaulding, Sam Lee 
Hampton, Earnest 



Jones, Birdie May 
Kinnebrew, Mary 
Lawrence, Lorna 
McLeroy, Homer 
Moon, Ruby 
Parham, Gertrude 
Seymour, Eunice 
Simms, Holley 
Vandiver, Edward 



Fifth Grade. 



Bondurant, Elizabeth 
Bomar, Jack 
Creekmore, Roy 
Cheeley, Bernice 
Davis, Moses 
Hughes, Opal 
Hampton, Belle 
Iverson, Frances 
Lester, Patman 
Moore, Willie Mae 



Newman, Anne 
Newman, Eva 
Newton, Charles Henry 
Prater, Susie 
Poss, James 
Pound, Ida 
Riviere, Annabel 
Sorrells, Dewey 
Vandiver, Shiela 



Sixth Grade. 



Born, Garland 
Burson, Frank 
Cox, Charles 
Callaway, Ragan 
Conway, Lillie 
Davis, Moses 
Drake, Anna Belle 
Hudson, Rosell 
Jarrell, Jessie L. 



Kenney, Beatty 
Presnell, Ida 
Paine, Mozelle 
Smith, Hattie L. 
Stephens, Paul 
Waldrep, Louise 
Whitehead, Clifton 
Wardlaw, Powell 



Seventh Grade. 



Bryant, Ray 
Ford, Carrie 
Ford, Doyle 
Fowler, Frank 
Gillespie, Clifford 
Haddock, Marguerite 
Jennings, Gladys 



Jennings, Vera 
Kenney, Garland 
Moore, Lurlie 
Newton, Charlotte 
Paine, Annie 
Robertson, Gladys 
Waldrep, William 



77 



Eighth Grade. 

Bray, Thelma Kinnebrew, Lucile 

Callaway, Edna Lambert, Annie 

Callaway, Hammond Poss, Walter 

Conway, Harlan Poss, Allen 

Drake, Kathleen Paine, Cora 

Haddock, Annie Shackelford, Moina 

Hampton, Sibyl Williamson, Ruth 




78 



BULLETIN 



OF 



The State Normal School 



ATHENS, GEORGIA 



Twenty-First Annual Session, 1914-1915 



APRIL, 1914 

Issued Quarterly by the State Normal School. 



Entered at the Post Office at Athens, Ga., as Second-Class Matter, November 8, 1913, 
under Act of Congress of July 1G, 1893. 



Vol. 1. 



No. 2. 



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CALENDAR, 1914-15. 



1914. 

Sept. 8, Tuesday, School Dormitories open. 
Sept. 8, Tuesday, Classification of Students. 
Sept. 9, Wednesday, Classification of Students. 
Sept. 10, Thursday, Fall Term begins at 9 A. M. 
Dec. 22, Tuesday, Christmas Holidays begin. 

(Kecitations end Monday P. M. Dec. 21.) 

1915. 

Jan. 5, Tuesday Re-opening of School. 

Jan. 21, Thursday, Mid-session Examinations. 

Apr. 17, Saturday, Founder's Day. 

May 30, Sunday, Commencement Sermon at 11 A. M. 

May 31, Monday, Annual Concert at 8:30 P. M. 

June 1, Tuesday, Annual Meeting of Board of Trustees at 10 A. M. 

June 1, Tuesday, Faculty Reception to Alumni-ae at 8:30 P. M. 

June 2, Wednesday, Alumni-ae Reunion at 12 Noon. 

June 2, Wednesday, Graduating Exercises at 8 P. 11 



New students may enter at any time during the year, but it i* 
best for them to enter September 10, or January 5. 

Prospective students will need to apply well in advance of their 
coming in order to be sure of places in the dormitories. The School 
•an accommodate only 400 boarding students at present. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES, 



B. S. MILLER, Columbus, Ga President. 

S. B. BROWN, Albany, Ga Vice-President. 

G. A. MELL, Athens, Ga Secretary and Treasurer. 

Members ex-officio. 

Governor J. M. Slaton Atlanta Ga. 

State Superintendent of Schools, M. L. Brittain Atlanta, Ga. 

Chancellor, University of Georgia, David C. Barrow Athens, Ga. 

Members-at-large. 

Col. W. J. Morton Athens, Ga. 

J. R. Hogan Agnes, Ga. 

Members City of Athens. 

T. J. Shackelford Athens, Ga. 

E. J. Bondurant Athens, Ga. 

Members Representing Trustees of University of Georgia. 

Augustus O. Bacon Macon, Ga. 

Hamilton McWhorter Athens, Ga. 

Byron B. Bower, Jr Bainbridge, Ga. 

Members Representing Congressional Districts. 

First District, Joseph W. Smith Manassas, Ga. 

Second District, S. B. Brown Albany, Ga. 

Third District, J. M. Collum Americus, Ga. 

Fourth District, B. S. Miller Columbus, Ga. 

Fifth District, J. R. Smith Atlanta, Ga. 

Sixth District, Dr. J. C. Beauchamp Williamson, Ga. 

Seventh District, E. S. Griff eth Buchanan, Ga. 

Eighth District, E. A. Copelan Greensboro, Ga. 

Ninth District, L. M. Brand Lawrenceville, Ga. 

Tenth District, Lawton B. Evans Augusta, Ga. 

Eleventh District, Charles Lane Helena, Ga. 



STANDING COMMITTEES, 



Prudential — Brittain, Morton, Barrow, McWhorter, Bondurant. 

Salaries — Miller, Beauchamp, Brand, Hogan, Evans, Brown. 

Teachers and Course of Study — Collum, Barrow, Lane, Brittai*, 
Bacon, Evans. 

Finance — Brand, Brown, Miller, Copelan, Bower, J. B. Smith. 

Grounds and Buildings — Bondurant, Barrow, Morton, J. W. Smitk, 
Griffeth. 

The President of the Board of Trustees is a member of all Stand- 
ing Committees, and the President of the School is a consulting 
member of the same. 



FACULTY AND OFFICERS. 



DAVID C. BAEEOW, LL.D Chancellor Ex-Officio. 

Chancellor of the University of Georgia. 

JEEE M. POUND, A. B President. 

ALEXANDEE EHODES Dean. 

MISS FANNIE H, SCOTT Eegistrar. 

MES. H. C. DOOLITTLE Stenographer. 

J. C. WAEDLAW, A. M. 

Psychology and Pedagogy. 

Director of Elementary Training School. 

PETEE F. BEOWN, A. M. 
English. 

MES. GEETEUDE A. ALEXANDEE, A. M. 
Expression. Assistant in English. 

T. E. HOLLINGSWOETH, A. B. 
Mathematics. 

DAVID L. EAENEST, A. M., 
Elementary Science. 

EUGENE C. BEANSON, A. M., 

Eural Economics. 

MISS EOBEETA HODGSON, A. M., 

History. 

FEEDEEICK A. MEEEILL, B. Sc, 
Geography and Nature Study. 

E. SCOTT SELL, B. S. A., 
Agriculture. 

MISS IDA A. YOUNG, L. I., 
Latin. 

JOSEPH LUSTEAT, Bach, es Lett., 
French and Spanish. 

MISS HELEN L. SPEOUT, 

German and Greek. 

Director of Correspondence Department. 

6 



MISS EDNA M. RANDALL, 
Household Arts. 

MISS BESSIE M. BAIED, 
Millinery and Dressmaking. 

MISS ANNIE LINTON, 
Manual Arts. 

MISS LUEA B. STRONG, 
Physical Education. 

MRS. AGNES EBERHART, 
Department of Instrumental Music. 

MISS JULIA McARTHTJR, 
Department of Voice. 

MISS AUGUSTA BLANCHARD CENTEB, 
Oratory. 

MISS SARA M. WEBB, 
Assistant in Department of Psychology and Pedagogy. 

MISS CHLOE LOYD, 
Assistant in Department of English. 

MISS IRIS CALLAWAY, 
Assistant in Department of Mathematics. 

MISS CHLOE E. ALLEN, 
Assistant in Department of Elementary Science. 

MISS MARY WOODS, 
Assistant in Departments of History and Geography. 

ALEXANDER RHODES, 
Assistant in Department of Agriculture. 

MISS PARNA B. HILL, 
Assistant in Department of Household Arts. 

MISS REBECCA STEWART, 
Assistant in Department of Household Arts. 

MISS MAUDE C. TOWNSEND, A. B., 
Assistant in Department of Manual Arts. 

MISS ADA JANE DOLAN 

MISS EDITH GUILL, 

Student-assistants in Department of Physical Culture. 

MISS BESSIE SMITH, 
Assistant in Department of Instrumental Music. 

MRS. MARY LEE DAVIS. 
Assistant in Department of Instrumental Music. 

7 



MISS KATE E. HICKS, 
Principal Elementary Training School. 

MISS ADA JANE DOLAN, 
Critic Teacher Seventh and Eighth Grades. 

MISS MAGNOLIA SCOVILLE, 
Critic Teacher Fifth and Sixth Grades. 

MISS ELIZABETH YOUNG, 
Critic Teacher Third and Fourth Grades. 

MISS NELLIE M. CLIFFORD. 
Critic Teacher Second Grade. 

MISS IV AH MOYER, 
Critic Teacher First Grade. 

MISS LAURA ELDER, 
Teacher of Rural School. 

MISS AGNES GOSS, 
Librarian. 

MISS MARGARET M. GIBBS, 
Assistant Librarian. 

MISS MOIENA MICHAEL, 
Matron Winnie Davis Hall. 

MISS NELLIE COLBERT, 

MISS BESSIE SMITH, 

Matrons Gilmer Hall. 

MISS KATE HICKS, 
Matron Senior Hall. 

MISS CHLOE ALLEN, 

MISS IRIS CALLOWAY, 

Matrons Bradwell Hall. 

MISS EMMIE JONES, 
Bookkeeper. 

MISS MOIENA MICHAEL, 
Y. W. C. A. Secretary. 

MRS. B. H. KINNEBREW, 
Housekeeper. 




_- 



FACULTY COMMITTEES, 1914-15. 



Library: Merrill, Goss, Hicks, Sprout, Brown, Hodgson. 

Calendar and Entertainments: Linton, Mc Arthur, Michael, Alexander, 
Rhodes. 

Schedule: Alexander, Loyd, Wardlow, Hollingsworth, Sell. 

Faculty Meetings: Earnest, Hollingsworth, Merrill, Hodgson, Lin- 
ton. 

Promotion and Publicity: Merrill, Alexander, Sell, Rhodes. 

Curriculum: Brown, Wardlaw, Hollingsworth, Young, Alexander, 
Randall, Sell, Linton. 

Publication: Merrill, Brown, Earnest, Sell. 

University Representative: Wardlaw, Brown, Alexander, Hollings- 
worth, Center, Earnest, Hodgson, Sell, Young, Randall, Linton, 
Strong, Webb, Loyd, Allen, Hicks. 

School Organizations: Wardlaw, Loyd, Mc Arthur, Sell, Earnest, 
Young, Michael. 

Classification: Hollingsworth, Brown, Merrill, Wardlaw, Sell. 

Alumni-ae: Loyd, Hicks, Allen, Woods, Elizabeth Young, Hill, Webb, 
Callaway, Dolan. 

Welfare: Rhodes, Broadus, Michael, Strong, Randall, Young, and 
Matrons. 

Grounds and Buildings: Rhodes, Sell, Linton. 

Employment: Earnest, Hicks, Wardlaw, Alexander, Scott. 

Records: Wardlaw, Hollingsworth, Sell, Randall, Allen. 



DIRECTIONS FOR REACHING ATHENS. 



Have all baggage plainly marked with your name and STATE 
NOEMAL SCHOOL, ATHENS, GA. 

Arrange to reach Athens in the day time. If this is impossible, 
notify the Dean of the school of the exact time you will arrive and 
of the railroad over which you will come, that some one may meet 
you at night. 

The school is on the street car line, as are also the Seaboard, 
the Gainesville Midland and the Southern stations. It is a five 
minute walk from the Central or Georgia stations to the car line. 
The conductors on the street cars will gladly tell you how to reach 
the school. 

Do not give your baggage checks to anyone at the depot but a 
representative of the school, and never give them to a negro dray- 
man. A representative of the Normal will meet each train. 



30 



GENERAL CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION. 



The purpose of this school is to "educate and train teachers for 
the common schools of Georgia. " The terms of admission are as 
follows: 

First: The applicant must be sufficiently mature and sufficiently 
well prepared to undertake the work of the school successfully. All 
students, when admitted, are considered upon probation for a reason- 
able length of time; and, when unwilling or unable to do the work 
required, they will be privately counseled to withdraw. 

Second: This institution is a vocational school, not a reformatory. 
We have no punishments. All trifling with rules and regulations or 
careless, indifferent, and improper conduct will subject the offender 
to the necessity of withdrawing. Only students with a serious purpose 
are desired. 

Third: Good Moral Character. Every student will be required to 
hand to the President a letter of recommendation from some respon- 
sible party in the home neighborhood. 

Fourth: Good Health. This school is delightfully situated in the 
Piedmont Hills. The conditions of health here cannot be surpassed. 

Fifth: Applicants for admission to the school must bring a 
letter from the home physician certifying that the applicant has not 
been exposed to any contagious diseases within the previous thirty 
days. See blank for this purpose, next to last page. This letter must 
be presented upon arrival. 

Sixth: Successful vaccination is also another absolutely necessary 
condition of entrance. All students upon arrival will have their arms 
examined by a physician; and if they do not have a satisfactory 
scar, they must be vaccinated at once before they can be admitted to 
the school, (at a cost of fifty cents each). In all cases it is better 
for applicants to be vaccinated before coming here, provided it can 
be done with fresh, pure, vaccine points. 

These last two conditions are so imperative, and will be adhered 
to so rigidly, that the applicant who neglects them will be necessarily 
subjected to great trouble in entering the school. Plainly and 
emphatically, these things must not be neglected by any applicant. 

Registering. 

Upon reaching the school, the student should go at once to the 
office of the Registrar and fill out a registration blank properly. This 
blank is then taken to the Dormitory Manager's office where a 
Dormitory Room Ticket will be obtained. All moneys and fees should 
at once be paid at this office and receipts secured for same. 

The Classification Committees will meet the students in various 

U 



class rooms for all assignments. The directory of where these com- 
mittees may be found will be posted in conspicuous places in the 
corridors of the academic building. In order to be properly classified 
at once, the student should bring letter of introduction, health certifi- 
cate, and all reports from former schools and teachers. 

Boarding Department. 

The school now has four dormitories: Gilmer Hall, Bradwell Hall, 
Winnie Davis Memorial Hall, and Senior Hall (the upper floor of the 
Dining Eoom Building). There is accommodation for four hundred 
students. All dormitories are steam-heated, with toilet rooms and 
baths on every floor abundantly supplied with hot and cold water. 
They are comfortable, pleasant, and healthful homes for the students. 
Students in each dormitory are under the care of a resident matron, 
who looks after their needs and comforts. The dining hall is one 
of the best in the state. 

Board in the dormitories includes room, table fare, heat, lights, 
and attendants for the rougher work. 

Each student will pay for, and look after her own laundering, 
with the assistance of the matron in charge. 

Each student must bring a pillow, pillow-cases, bed-clothes (includ- 
ing at least one white spread), towels, hair-brush and comb, and other 
personal toilet articles; also a bath-robe, bed-room slippers, overshoes^ 
wrap and umbrella. 

The male stiidents do not room in the dormitories. Kooms are 
rented for them near the campus and paid for by the school. Such 
students pay the same rate for board as outlined in the catalogue, 
furnishing bedding, etc., just as the girls do. 

Parents and friends visiting students cannot be accommodated 
in the dormitories, as there is no room for them. They can secure 
board in the city. 

Expenses. 

Terms for Board. 

(Payable in advance as indicated) 

September 10, 1914 — First Payment $25.00 

November 12, 1914 — Second Payment 25.00 

January 28, 1915— Third Payment 25.00 

April 1, 1915— Fourth Payment 25.00 

$100.00 
Matriculation Fee (to be paid on entrance) 10.00 

Board for students who do not make the full quarterly payments, 
as indicated above, will be at the rate of $3.00 per week, or 50 cents 
per day. 

U 



Students who cannot enter at the regular dates will be received 
at any time during the session just as their opportunities may permit, 
board being charged only from the time of entering school. 

All students entering before September 15th will be charged 
from date of opening (Sept. 10th). Those entering on and after 
September loth will be charged from the date they enter school. 

All non-resident students must room and board in the school 
dormitories. No exception will be made to this except by the con- 
sent and approval of the school authorities. 

There is no tuition paid by Georgia students. Students from 
outside the State are required to pay $40.00 per year; $20.00 upon 
entrance, and $20.00 at the beginning of the second semester. 

Money deposited on dormitory account will not be refunded. 
Money deposited on personal account may be withdrawn at any time. 

Checks for board or tuition should not be made payable to the 
President, but to the student herself. 

Students must supply their own text-books. Books will be 
furnished at publisher's prices, with cost of handling added. A 
second-hand book store is also operated for the benefit of the students, 
who wish to buy or sell second-hand books. 

Winnie Davis Memorial Hall. 

Students who wish to occupy rooms in the "Winnie Davis Memorial 
Hall must have letters assigning them these rooms by August 15th. 
If these assignments are not made by this date, the school authorities 
will reserve the right to fill these rooms with other students. These 
letters of appointment can only be secured through the U. D. C. 
Chapters that furnished the rooms. They must be properly signed by 
the President of the Chapter, and mailed to the President of the 
school by August 15th. 

The Infirmary. 

(Miss Ila Broadus, trained nurse, in charge). 
This is a small building of four rooms. It has bathrooms, lava- 
tories, toilets, electric lights, hot and cold water, and a gas range. 
The furnishings are entirely comfortable. It is a cozy, quiet retreat 
for students who from time to time may need such quiet. The 
infirmary is in charge of a trained nurse, most of whose time is spent, 
not in looking after students who are sick, but in caring for them 
to see that they do not get sick. With. the matrons, she takes general ; 
oversight and care of the entire student body. The nurse will also 
give lectures on home nursing, hygiene, and sanitation to certain 
classes during the year. The health of the student body has always 
been superb. 

13 



Carnegie Library. 

This beautiful building was the generous gift of Mr. Andrew 
Carnegie four years ago. It is equipped with handsome library 
furniture in perfect harmony with the elegance of the building. 

The library is open daily (except Sunday) from 8:45 in the morning 
until six in the evening, closing for the dinner hour. Although 
occupied less than four years, it has awakened new interest and has 
shown a marvelous growth, the circulation each year almost doubling 
that of the previous year. The library consists of 8,340 volumes, 
more than a thousand new books having been added during each of 
the past years. From one to two hundred books are taken out daily, 
and on an average the library is read through more than twice in 
every school year. 

One of the great purposes of the library is to create in the 
students an interest in good literature, and to encourage a desire for 
reading. Nearly all the studies in a Normal School require reference 
work, and much supplementary material is needed in prepairing lesson 
plans in history, geography, and other studies. New books selected 
by the departments are added each year to meet these needs. 
Periodical literature is also of great value in reference work, and 
the library subscribes to a number of judiciously selected magazines, 
which are bound as the volumes are completed, and with their indexes 
are of invaluable aid in supplying material for debates and other 
reference work. 

Uniforms. 

To promote economy, simplicity, and good taste in dress, every 
young woman in the school, unless specially excused by the President, 
is required to purchase and wear the uniform adopted by the school. 
Bequests to be excused from wearing the uniform will not be con- 
sidered except for very exceptional and unusual reasons. 

The uniform consists of the following articles: 

For church and street wear — a blue serge suit and cap, white 
waist, tan gloves and black shoes. 

For class room wear — the blue serge suit skirt, uniform waist of 
white poplin or lawn, blue Windsor tie. In winter a waist or serge 
like the skirt may be substituted for the white waist. 

For summer and evening wear — a white poplin wash skirt and 
white waist. 

The suit, cap, gloves, white skirts, tie and woolen waist (if worn) 
can be bought only in Athens and may be ordered by mail before 
the student leaves home. The order for them must be placed not 
later than the end of the first week after arrival at the school. The 
white waists for school, church, and evening wear must be made of 
the material and according to the patterns designated in the accom- 
panying leaflet giving detailed descriptions. 

14 



The above requirements will be rigidly enforced. There must be 
no attempt at evasion or partial violation of these regulations. No 
other articles, however similar can be substituted for those specified. 

Students are expected to wear the uniform at all times both on 
and off the campus. They need not bring to the school dresses of 
other kinds, for it is desired that the uniform be worn on all occasions. 

Uniforms must be kept in good condition. The enforcement of 
all regulations with regard to the uniform is within the authority of 
the matrons of the several dormitories. Students may be required 
to buy new garments whenever in the judgment of the President and 
the matrons it is deemed necessary. 

Students must not sell nor give east off uniform garments to 
persons living in the vicinity of Athens. 

The uniform skirt, cap, and white waist should be worn by former 
students when returning to the school in September. All students 
must wear the uniform as a travelling dress at all other times. 

It is very desirable that uniforms be ordered before leaving home. 
A detailed description and order blank will be furnished upon request 
made to the Kegistrar. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 



Applicants for the Common School Methods or Eeview Classes must 
have license to teach, present written evidence in the form of certifi- 
cates from their last instructors, or show in examination that they 
have satisfactorily completed at least the equivalent of eight scholastic 
years of study. These courses are intended to prepare applicants for 
the state teachers' examination or for advanced woTk in this school. 
Applicants should choose one of the two courses under the aivice of 
instructors here. 

Common School Methods. Review. 

Professional Texts 2 English Composition 2 

Methods in Language and American Literature 2 

Grammar 3 Algebra 5 

Reading 1 English History 4 

Arithmetic 3 Physical and Economic Geo- 

Physiology 2 graphy and Nature Study.. 3 

U. S. and Georgia History and Latin or Arithmetic 4 

Civics 3 Physical Culture 2 

Geography and Nature Study. 2 — 

Agriculture 2 . 22 

Drawing 1 Maximum 28 

Physical Culture 2 

Common School Music 2 



>* 



LI 



ACADEMIC AND INDUSTRIAL DIPLOMA CLASSES. 



Applicants for the Freshman class in either the Academic or Indus- 
trial course must present written evidence in the form of certifi- 
cates of the satisfactory completion of at least the equivalent of nine 
grades in common schools and accredited high schools or stand an 
entrance examination. Candidates for the more advanced classes must 
present similar evidence of having satisfactorily completed the work 
of the previous grades. 

Academic students may take special courses in Household ATts and 
Manual Arts provided for that purpose. 

Optional work may be selected by all students from equivalent or 
lower classes to the full extent of the time allowed in each class. 

Freshman Class. 



Academic. 

Practical Pedagogy 1 

English Rhetoric 2 

English Literature 2 

Plane Geometry 4 

Algebra 2 

Physics or Latin 3 

Ancient History 3 

Physiography ." 2 

Physical Culture 2 



Industrial. 

Rhetoric 2 

Literature 2 

Physics 3 

History or Mathematics 3 

Agricultural Botany 2 

Model and Plain Sewing 2 

Elementary Drawing 2 

Handicrafts 1 

Physical Culture '. . • 2 



Total required 21 

Maximum 27 



19 



Maximum 25 

Sophomore Clas,s 



Academic. 



Industrial. 



A, 



English Literature 3 ' Psychology 3 



Theme Writing 1 

Solid Geometry 4 

Chemistry or Latin 3 

Mediaeval History 2 

Biology 3 

Physical Culture 2 

Total required 21 

Maximum 27 



Theme 'Writing 1 

Mathematics 2 

Chemistry 3 

Biology 3 

Soils and Field Crops 3 

PhysicalCulture 2 

Household Arts: 

Cooking 2 

Theory of Foods 2 

Manual Arts: 

Ele. ATts and Crafts 2 

Drawing and Color 2 



Minimum 21 

Maximum 27 



16 



— 



*y-+~*-3 



rt a. 




^^ 




Junior 

Academic. 

ret. of Ed. and Prins. Teach. . 4 

Study 2 

Methods 2 

Prins. and Progress of Poetry 

and Drama 3 

Expression . . . ." 4 

Mathematics, Off ^History, or 

Latin, or French, or Spanish, 

or German, or Greek 2 

Household Management, or 

Economics 2 

Physical Culture 2 

Common School Music 2 

Total required 23 

Maximum 29 



Class. ] 

Industrial. 

Required: 

Methods 2 

Hist, and Prins. Teaching.... 4 

Child Study 2 

Physical Culture 2 

Agriculture: 
Fruit Growing and Vegetable 

Gardening 2 

Animal Husbandry and Poultry 2 

Household Arts: 

Dressmaking 2 

Textiles and Household Man- 
agement 3 

Millinery and Art Needlework 2 

Manual Arts: 

Mech. Drawing 3 

Adv. Drawing and Color 2 



Senior 

Academic. 

Mefcfar-«nd Sch. Man \^ 

Prac. Teaching T>. 4 

Conference f 

English Grammar & Lit. for 

the Grades 2 

Expression '^~ 

Mathematics, or History, or 
Latin, or French, or Spanish, 

or German, or Greek 2 

Agriculture 2 

Physical Culture 2 

Common School Music 2 

Total required 22 

Maximum 28 



Minimum 20 

Maximum 26 

Class 

Industrial. 
Required: 

Practice Teaching 4 

Conference 1 

Physical Culture 2 

Agriculture: 
Farm Management and Plant 

Breeding 2 

Household ATts: 
Adv. Cooking and Serving.... 2 
Household Chem. & Bacteri- 
ology 2 

Dietetics, Organization and 

Management 3 

Home Nursing 2 

Manual Arts: 
Mech. Drawing, Woodwork .... 2 

Handicrafts 2 

Adv. Drawing & Color 2 

Theory & History of Desipn .... 2 



Minimum 20 

V:i\ imnm 26 



17 



Common School Methods Class. 

Professional Texts. Text-book, Manual of Methods for Georgia 
Teachers. A. Manual of Methods for Georgia; (a) History and 
Principles of Education; (b) Methods of Teaching Common 
School Subjects; (c) Special Day Programs; (dj The School 
and the Community. 

B. Reading Courses, (a) The Teacher and the School, Colgrove; 
(b) Civics and Health, Allen; (c) High School Administra- 
tion, Hollister. 

Language and Grammar. Text, The Modern Course in English, Book 
II by Sanford, Brown, and Smith. (1) The principles of ele- 
mentary, oral and written composition. (2) The analysis of 
sentences and the use of the diagram. (3) A detailed study 
of the parts of speech, their classes, modifications, and con- 
structions. (4) Discussions of the best methods of teaching 
composition and grammar in elementary and intermediate 
schools. 

Beading, (a) Study of all reading books adopted by the State of 
Georgia: 1, Required. 2, Supplementary; (b) Study of 
Phonics, (c) Study of methods in teaching reading, (d) Study 
of the dramatization of literature suitable for children, (e) 
Discussion of suitable plays for school presentation, (f) Dis- 
cussion of story telling: 1. How to tell stories; 2. What to tell; 
3. Where to secure the proper stories; 4. Stories suited to 
different grades. 

Arithmetic. Text: Milne's Progressive, Georgia Edition. This course 
is designed for teachers and will consist for the most part of 
methods, including the correct use of the text. 

Physiology. Methods of study and teaching the Physiologies adopted 
for use in the Common Schools of the State, Ritchie and Hutch- 
inson; Structure and Function, Personal Hygiene, and the 
fundamental facts of Sanitation. 

United States History. Text: Evans Essential Facts in American 
History. 1, Period of settlement and three groups of civiliza- 
tion developed. 2, Period of Revolution and Independence. 3, 
Period of Development of Government. 4. Period of Sectional 
Antagonisms. 5, Period of Civil Strife. 6, Period of Progress 
and Modern Problems. 

Pupil teachers ' preparation of plans in subject and method. Use 
of Library References. Use of auxiliary material. Criticisms 
of the text, comparison with other texts. Practice teaching and 
observation. Criticism of the pupils plans, materials and 
practice. 

18 



All instruction will be based on a daily assignment of the 
texts. Instruction in methods will be based on a thorough 
knowledge of the subject matter and any pupil not familiar 
with the subject matter will be entirely unable to do the work 
of the class. 

Georgia History. Text: Brooks History of Georgia. 1, Geographical 
conditions. 2, First settlement. 3, Colonial and Revolutionary 
Periods. 4, Georgia and her Indian relations. 5, Economic, 
social and political aspects of slavery. 6, Georgia in Secession 
and Georgia in the Civil War. 7, Reconstruction. 8, Develop- 
ment since 1870. 

Civil Government. Text: Peterman's Civil Government. 1, Forms 
of Government in the United States. 2, The Constitution. 3, 
The Departments of Federal Government. 4, State, Local and 
Municipal Government. 

Geography. Text: Frye's Common School Geography. A general 
review of geographic laws and facts together with the method 
of presentation best adapted to classroom work. The relation 
of this science to other school subjects will be stressed. 

Nature Study. Text: Merrill's "What to Teach in Nature Study. 
Reading: Hodge's Nature Study and Life. A study of the plant s 
and animals most likely to be taught in the schools of our state. 
Special attention will be given to the method of presentation. 
Both recitation and laboratory work will be done. 

Agriculture. Texts: Practical Lessons in Agriculture, Merrill; and 
Hunnicutt's Agriculture, Deloach. 1, The soil; types, moisture 
and temperature. 2, Corn, cotton and other crops. 3, The 
improvement of crops. 4, Dairying, the Babcock milk test. 5, 
Commercial fertilizers. 6, Composition of feeds. 

Drawing. A course in elementary drawing. Outlines from nature 
objects; still life drawing; a study of the principles of perspec- 
tive. 

Physical Culture. 

Common School Music. This course is intended to prepare teachers 
to read easy music at sight and to lead their children in simple 
singing exercises. 

Review Class. 

English Composition. Text, Hitchcock 'a Enlarged Practice Book in 
English Composition. 1, The composition as a whole. 2, The 
construction of paragraphs. 3. The construction of sentences 

1? 



and their arrangement in paragraphs. 4, The proper choice 
and use of words. 5, The use of punctuation. 6, The four 
forms of discourse: Narration, Description, Exposition, and 
Argument. 

American Literature. Text, Howe 's, A Primer of American Literature. 

1, A brief sketch of the lives and works of American Authors. 

2, A careful and critical study of the works of Irving, Bryant, 
Webster, Emerson, Whittier, Lowell, Poe, Lanier, Hayne, and 
Russell. 3, Eeading outside of the class-room and making 
written reports upon the works of Franklin, Cooper, Long- 
fellow, Hawthorne, Hale and Whitman. 

Algebra. Text, Collins' First Course, complete. This is an elemen- 
tary course but students taking the work are supposed to have 
had one year's work in algebra and be able to complete the 
text in one year. 

Arithmetic. Text, DurelPs Book Three. A thorough treatment of 
the most practical topics, including industrial problems and 
drills in oral as well as written arithmetic. 

English History. Text, Cheney's Short History of England. 1, The 
Great Dynasties of England and the work accomplished by 
these. 2, The Development of English Institutions, Liberties 
and Laws. 3, Changes and progress in English Economic, Social 
and Political conditions. 4, The English National Ideals as a 
basis for our own history. 

Physical and Economic Geography. Text, Dryer's High School Geo- 
graphy and Merrill's Field and Laboratory Manual in Physical 
Geography. A study of the earth forces in relation to man's 
distribution and industries. The economic features of geography 
are stressed. Laboratory work is required of all students. 

Nature Study. Text, Merrill's What to Teach in Nature Study. 
Presentation of the commoner things in nature as adapted to 
classroom teaching. This course leads up to the course in 
Biology given in the SophomoTe Class. 

Latin. Text, Nuttings Latin Primer. First Semester: Drill in paradi- 
gms. Constant use of the most fundamental constructions. A 
working vocabulary of interest to pupils beginning the study. 
Second Semester: Nuttings Primer continued. First Latin 
Reader. 

Physical Culture. 

Freshman Class. 

Practical Pedagogy. Text, Strayer's Brief Course in the Teaching 
Process. Aim of education; Type lessons; Lesson plans; Physical 

20 



welfare of children; Social phases of education; The course of 
study; Supervision. 

Rhetoric. Text, Hitchcock's Rhetoric and the Study of Literature. 
1, Study and practice in the principles of literary style; unity, 
coherence, and emphasis. 2, Review of narration, description, 
exposition, and argument, with illustrations from literature. 3, 
The writing and criticism of themes on subjects from literature. 

English Literature. Text, Hitchcock's Rhetoric and the Study of 
Literature; Newcomer and Andrews' Twelve Centuries of 
English Prose and Poetry. 1, A brief sketch of the leading 
English authors and their principal works. 2, Careful and 
critical study of one work of each of the following: Shake- 
speare, Milton, Boswell, Gray, Goldsmith, Burns, Wordsworth, 
Shelly, Keats, Coleridge, Scott, DeQuincy, Carlyle, Tennyson, 
and Browning. 3, Reading and reports upon one work of: 
Shakespeare, Bunyan, Addison, Defoe, Swift, Goldsmith, Scott, 
Byron, Lamb, Dickens, Thackeray, Bulwer, and George Eliot. 

Geometry. Text, (Plane Geometry) Wentworth-Smith 's Plane & Solid 
Geometry — four books, including practically all the exercises 
and corollaries. Practical application and the use of instru- 
ments in constructions. 

Algebra. (Advanced Algebra). Text, Wells and Hart's Second Course. 
Graphs of linear and of quadratic equations, determinants, 
theory of exponents, etc., to logarithms. 

Physics. Text, Millikan and Gale's Revised Physics. Accompanied 
by work in the laboratory. The pupil will study with the 
facts and forces generally met in daily life. Training in the 
power of independent thinking, acquisition of the scientific 
spirit, understanding the world of force and action are kept in 
view. 

Ancient History. Text, Botsford's Ancient World. First Semester: 
Greek History. Greek contribution to present day ideals of 
government and culture. 

Second Semester: Roman History. Roman contributions to our 
life today, especially in law and government. 

Physiography. Text, Salisbury, Barrows, and Tower's Elements of 
Geography, and Merrill's Field and Laboratory Manual in 
Physical Geography. Advanced physiography in its more de- 
tailed application to the United States will be given in this 
class. 

Latin. Text, (First Semester) Dooge's Latin Book, Viri Romae. 
(Second Semester) Gunnison and Harley, Caesar. Book V. 

21 



Second expedition into Britain. Uprising in Northern Gaul. 
Book VI. Gallic Customs; German Customs. Gaul and Germany 
compared. Sight Eeading. 

Physical Culture. 

Sophomore Class 

Psychology. Text, Eead's Introductory Psychology. Physiological 
Psychology; Nature and Function of Mental Processes; Percep- 
tion, Apperception, Memory, Imagination, Association, Thought, 
Induction, Deduction, Feeling, Emotion, Instinct, Interest, At- 
tention, Will, Habit, Inhibition, Character. 

English Literature. Text, Newcomer and Andrews' Twelve Centuries 
of English Poetry and Prose. 1, Lectures and quizzes upon the 
elements and kinds of literature. 2, Studies of selections from 
English authors illustrating the elements of literature and the 
various forms that are treated of in the lectures. 

Themes. One theme a week upon subjects chosen from studies in 
literature. 

Geometry. Text, (Solid Geometry) WentwortlnSmith 's Plane and 
Solid Geometry. Practical measurements of plane surfaces and 
constructions and measurements of solids. 

Algebra. Text, To be selected. Advanced Algebra completed, includ- 
ing the binomial theorem, complex numbers, proportion, varia- 
tion, logarithmic computation, and supplementary topics. 

Chemistry. Text, Brownlee 's Chemistry and Laboratory Manual. The 
foundation is here laid for the course in Domestic Science. 

Mediaeval History. Text, Robinson's Western Europe. 1, Develop- 
ment of European States. 2, Development of Catholic Church. 
3, Development of Holy Eoman Empire. 4, The Study of 
Mediaeval Institutions and their breakdown. 5, The Crusades 
and their effect on European life and culture. 6, The Eise of 
Towns, Trade, and the Common People. 7, The Renaissance and 
the changes from Mediaeval to Modern times. 

Biology. Text, Bailey and Coleman's First Course in Biology. A 
study of plant and animal biology. The text used is the one 
recommended by the State Board for use in high schools. 
Laboratory work will be required. 

Latin. Text, Allen and Greenough's Grammar. Cicero. Text Gunni- 
son & Harley. Three Orations against Cataline. One Oration 
for Achias. Composition work based on Cicero by Dooge. 

Physical Culture. 



Junior Class. 

History of Education. Text, Parker's History of Modern Elementary 
Education. Oriental, Classical, Mediaeval and Eenaissanee 
Education; Educational Theories of Comenius, Locke, Eousseau, 
Pestalozzi, Frobel, HeTbart, Spencer; Present Tendencies in 
Education; Modern School Systems; The American Public 
School. 

Principles of Teaching. Text; Thorndike's Principles of Teaching. 
The Meaning of Education, of the School, of the Curriculum; 
The Place of Instinct, Interest and Attention in the Teaching 
Process; Principles of Teaching Based on the Laws of Associa- 
tion, Dissociation, Apperception, Memory, Thought, Action. 

Child Study. Text, Pyle's Outline of Educational Psychology. 
Physical Development: (a)Infancy; (b) Adolescence; (c) 
Maturity. Mental Development: (a) Heredity; (b) Instincts; 
(c) Memory; (d) Attention. Moral Development: (a) Habit; 
(b) Self-government. Fatigue. Abnormalities. 

Methods. Text, No text-book required. The lesson; types, lesson 
planning, supervised observation in the Training School with 
criticism, group teaching by students with criticism. 

English Poetry, Its Principles and Progress. Text, Gay ley and 
Young's English Poetry. English Poetry, its Progress and 
Masterpieces;' (a) Literature in general; (b) Poetry proper; (c) 
The Creative Expression; (d) The Ehythm of Verse, Foot and 
Metre; (e) Tonality in Verse; Melody; (f) Tonality in Verse; 
Harmony; Khyme; (g) The Kinds of Poetry; (h) The Judg- 
ment of Poetry; (i) The Origins of the Language; the Develop- 
ment of the Language and the beginning of the Literature; 
(j) Chaucer, Spenser, Milton, Dryden, Pope, Gray, Goldsmith, 
Burns, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats, Macaulay, 
Tennyson, Browning, Arnold. 

English Drama, Its Progress and Masterpieces, (a) History of the 
Drama: 1, The Greek Drama; 2, Latin Drama; 3, French Drama; 
4, English Drama; (b) Dramatic Construction; (c) Study of 
Masterpieces; Antigone; Everyman; Marlowe's plays; Ben 
Jonson's plays; The Rivals; The School for Scandal; She 
Stoops to Conquer; Modern Drama of the English school, the 
French School, the German School, the Irish School, the Scandi- 
navian School, the American School. 

Expression. Texts, Evolution of Expression, Vol. I and II; The Tone 
System in Public Speaking and Reading; Rhetoric and the 
Study of Literature; Shakespeare: The Merchant of Venice, As 

23 



You Like It, Julius Caesar, Borneo and Juliet, Richard II, 
Richard III, Twelfth Night, (a) Study of the principles of 
expression; (b) Literary Analysis of selections; (c) Toning 
selections for reading; (d) Drill upon vocal expression, 1, 
Vocal drills; 2, Breathing exercises; 3, Reading to an audience 
with and without a book; 4, Phonic drills, and methods of 
teaching reading; (e) Pantomime; (f) Moving Pictures, original 
scenarios; (g) Interpretation of Shakespeare; (b) Presenting 
scenes from Shakespeare and other authors. 

Plane Trigonometry. Text, Wentworth-Smith 's Plane Trigonometry. 
Tables in separate text. The course includes the solution of all 
kinds of triangles and plane surfaces: (1) Without logarithms 
and (2) By use of logarithms. Field practice in the use of 
simple and inexpensive instruments makes the course practical 
and interesting . 

Arithmetic. Text, (Problems, outlines, and methods by the head of 
the department). A course in subject matter and methods 
designed for certificate students in mathematics and for those 
who desire preparation for teaching. 

Modern European History. Text, Schwill's Political History of 
Modern Europe. The Reformation in European states: 1, Period 
of Absolutism; 2, Revolution and Democracy; 3, Unification of 
Germany and Italy; 4, The Minor States of Europe. 

Economics. No text selected. The economics of the home, the school 
tand the state. This class is open for all young men in the 
school. 

Latin. Text, Fairclough and Bunn, Books I, II, IV, VI. Virgil. 

French and Spanish. The first yeaT of a two year course is offered in 
these languages. Sight reading, translation and writing from 
simple texts. 

German. Text, Keller's First Year German. Grammar and Syntax. 
Reading of easy German text. 

Greek. Text, White's First Greek Book. First elements; verbs, 
syntax, simple translation. 

Household Management. Text, Terrill-Bevier-Elliott 's Handbook of 
Housekeeping, (a) House Construction; (b) Furnishings; (c) 
Processes of the Household; (d) Relation to Community Life; 
(e) Teaching of this subject. 

Physical Culture. 

Common School Music. 

24 



Senior Class 

General and Special Methods. Text, Roark's Method in Education. 
The Aim of Education, Province of Method, General Principles 
Underlying Method; The Recitation; Organization of Subject 
Matter; Special Methods of Teaching Reading, Spelling, Lan- 
guage, Grammar, Arithmetic, History ; Civics, Geography, Nature 
Study, Drawing, Physiology, Physical Training. Correlation 
of Subjects in the Course of Study. Observation and Discussion 
of Type Lessons taught in the Training School and the Rural 
School. 

School Management and Supervision. Text, Colgrove's Teacher and 
the School. The Aims, The Teacher, Qualifications and Pre- 
paration, Course of Study, Daily Program, Classification, Pro- 
motion, Incentives, Coercives, Records and Grading, Character 
Building, Rural School in Relation to the General Rural 
Problem. 

Observation and Practice Teaching. Observation, Lesson Planning, 
Criticism; Practice Teaching under Supervision, with Criticism. 

Conference. Discussion of the work of the Training School and of 
the Rural School and of vital educational problems. 

English Grammar. Text, Sanford and Brown's Modern Grammar for 
High Schools. An advanced course, discussing the new nomen- 
clature, definitions, and syntactical constructions. 

Literature For Elementary Schools. Text, Selected classics for chil- 
dren. The planning of a course in poems and stories for the 
common school grades from the first to the seventh. Practice 
in memorizing poems and telling stories. 

Expression. Text, Evolution of Expression, Vol. Ill and Vol. IV 
(Review of Vol. I. and II); all Reading Books adopted by the 
State of Georgia; Plays representing the progress and develop- 
ment of the drama; Little Classics for Oral English; Shake- 
speare: Lear, Othello, Macbeth, and Hamlet, (a) Continuation 
of all work commenced in Junior Year, (b) Study of all read- 
ing books adopted by the State, both required and supplemen- 
tary, (c) Model lessons, using the required reading books, (d) 
Presentation of scenes from all forms of drama, Greek plays; 
Morality plays; 18th Century plays; Modern drama; Shake- 
speare, (e) Presentation of class plays. 

Analytic Geometry. Text, To be selected. Prerequisite for this course 
is the course in trigonometry outlined in the Junior Class. 

25 



Elementary Mathematics. Text, (Outlines and methods furnished by 
the head of the department.) A course in reviews and methods 
to meet the needs of certificate students and others who desire 
special preparation for teaching these subjects. 

History. Text, Muzzey's American History. 1, Establishment and 
Separation of the Colonies. 2, National and Sectional Interests. 
3, Slavery and Disunion. 4, War and Reconstruction. 5, 
Political and Industrial Development since the Civil War. 

Agriculture. Texts, Warren's Elements of Agriculture, and Merrill's 
Practical Lessons in Agriculture. 1, The soil, origin, composi- 
tion and mulches. 2, Farm implements. 3, Budding and graft- 
ing. 4, Feeds and feeding, balanced ration. 5, Insects and 
crop diseases. 

Latin. Text, (First Semester) Chase and Stuart's Horace's Odes. 
(Second Semester) Lincoln 's Livy. 

French and Spanish. The second year of a two year course. More 
advanced reading, translating and writing in these languages. 

German. Continuation of grammatical drill. Eeading of standard 
literature in prose and poetry. Sight translation. 

Greek. Text, White's First Greek Book. Continuation of grammar. 
Zenaphon's Anabasis, Books 1, 2 and 3. 

Physical Culture. 

Common School Music. 



INDUSTRIAL COURSE. 



Freshman Class. 

English. See Academic Freshman Class. 

Elementary Form and Constructive Geometry. Text, Campbell's 
Observational Geometry. 

Industrial Problems. Text: Breckenridge, Merceran, and Moore's Shop 
Problems. 

Physics. See Academic Freshman Class. 

History. See Academic Freshman Class. 

Agricultural Botany. Text, Andrews' Practical Course in Botany. 1, 
Seed, germination and growth; 2, The root, stem and leaf. 3, 



The flower and its function. 4, Cryptogams, algae, fungi, ferns, 
etc. 

Household Arts. Text, Gingle's Lessons in Garment Drafting. 

Model Sewing. First Semester. Practical and Ornamental 
Stitches. Relation to teaching of the subject. 

Plain Sewing. Second Semester. Use of bought patterns. Pat- 
tern drafting. Garment making. Hand and machine work. 

Manual Arts. 

Elementary Drawing. Freehand drawing, consisting of studies 
from nature and still life. Mediums: Pencil, ink and brush, 
colored crayon, water colors. Fee for materials, $1.50 per term. 

Elementary Handicrafts. Problems and processes in paper and 
cardboard construction, clay modeling, pottery, weaving, and 
raffia work. Methods suitable for elementary grades. Fee for 
material, $1.50 per term. 

Physical Culture. 

Sophomore Class. 

Psychology. See Academic Sophomore Class. 

Themes. A theme once a week upon some topic relating to the student's 
work in the other departments of the school or upon some study 
in literature. 

Bookkeeping. Home and Farm Accounts and Business Arithmetic. 
Single and Double Entry Bookkeeping. 

Chemistry. See Academic Sophomore Class. 

Biology. See Academic Sophomore Class. 

Agriculture. Texts, Fletcher's Soils, and Duggar's Field Crops. 

Soils: 1, The formation of soil. 2, Composition and kinds of soils. 
3, The benefits of tillage and plowing. 4, Commercial fertilizers. 
5, Two periods per week will be given to work in the laboratory 
with soils. 

Field Crops: 1, Corn, judging and improvement. 2, Cotton, fertili- 
zers, enemies and diseases. 3, Oats, structure, varieties and 
enemies. 4, This course will include two periods per week in the 
school garden when weather permits. 

Household Arts. Text, Snyder's Human Foods. 

Elementary Cookery. Fundamental principles. Application in 

laboratory. 
Theory of Foods. Physiology of Digestion. Food production and 

manufacture. Nutritive value. 

27 



Manual Arts. 

Drawing. Still life, grouping, light and shade, theory and prin- 
ciples of design. Fee, $1.50 per term. 

Handicrafts. Handwork suitable for intermediate grades 
Mediums. Cardboard and paper, clay, raffia and other basketry. 

Materials, thin woods, etc. Fee, $1.50 per term. 

Physical Culture. 

Junior Class. 

Methods. See Academic Junior Class. 

History of Education and Principles of Teaching. See Academic Junior 
Class. 

Child Study. See Academic Junior Class. 

Agriculture. 

Fruit Growing. Text, Bailey's Principles of Fruit Growing. 1, 
Location and planting of orchard. 2, Tillage and orchard man- 
agement. 3, Grafting and pruning. 

Vegetable Gardening. Text, Bailey's Manual of Gardening, 1, 
The selection of a site, soil, convenience, etc. 2, Fertilizers and 
vegetables suited for the. South. 

Animal Husbandry. Text, Smith's Profitable Stock Feeding. 1, 
The relation of livestock to soil fertility. 2, Cows, horses, sheep, 
etc. 3, The Babcock milk test. 4, Balanced rations. 

Farm Poultry. Text, Watson's Farm Poultry. 1, Study of the 
different breeds. 2, Poultry houses. 3, The management of 
incubators and brooders. 

Household Arts. Text: Gibbs' Household Textiles. 

Textiles. The fibers: cotton, flax, silk, wool. Production of 

fabrics. Selection of clothing. 
Dressmaking. Use of patterns. Application of design. Garment 

making. 
Household Management. See Academic Junior Class. 
Millinery and Art Needlework. Fundamental stitches. Making 

and trimming hats. Embroidery, etc. Teaching of subject. 

Manual Arts. 

Drawing and Color. Charcoal sketches, composition, landscape 
and pose drawing, blackboard illustration, and history of art. 
Fee, $1.50 per term. 

Mechanical drawing, woodwork, basketry, pottery bookbinding. 
Fee, $1.50 per term. 

Physical Culture. 



Senior Class 

Practice Teaching. See Academic Senior Class. 
Conference. See Academic Senior Class. 

Agriculture. 

Farm Management. Text, Card's Farm Management. 1, Farm 
plans, size and location of fields. 2, Market problems and co- 
operation. 3, Eecords and accounts. 

Plant Breeding. Text, Domesticated Animals and Plants. 1, 
Natural vs. artificial selection. 2, Variability and how charac- 
ters are transmitted. 3, The systematic improvement of plants. 
4, Origin of domesticated races. 

Household Arts. 

Advanced Cooking and Serving. Review of elementary processes. 

Development of more elaborate forms. Laboratory application. 

Planning and serving of meals. Economic studies. 
Household Chemistry and Bacteriology. Text, Vulte and Goodell 's 

Household Chemistry. Lecture and recitation. Laboratory 

studies and experiments. 
Dietetics. Food requirement. Diet in health and disease. Infant 

and child feeding. 
Organization and Management. Courses of study for town and 

rural schools. Problems of equipment. Cost of maintenance. 
Home Nursing. Text, Maxwell & Pope 's Practical Nursing. Care 

of the sick. Hygiene and sanitation. Prevention of disease. 

Manual Arts. 

Advanced Color. Pictorial drawing, design, black printing, 

stenciling, history of art. Fee, $1.50. 
Handicrafts. Woodwork, mechanical drawing, book -binding, 

leather tooling, Fee, $1.50. Lecture and reading course on the 

theory and practice of Manual Training. 

Physical Culture. 



PSYCHOLOGY AND PEDAGOGY. 



Common School Methods Class. 

Professional Texts. A course based upon the Manual of Methods 
for Georgia Teachers and the reading courses prescribed for teachers 
by the State Board of Education. Methods of teaching the common 
school subjects. Conferences and reports upon the prescribed reading 
courses. 

29 



Required Reading: 1. Civics and Health — Allen; 2. The Teacher 
and the School — Colgrove; 3. High School Administration — Hollister. 

Freshman Class. 

Practical Pedagogy. A course treating as concretely as possible 
the typical methods of instruction, the daily problems of the class- 
room, and the art of teaching in its most practical form. 

Sophomore Class. 

Psychology. A course in Psychology from the standpoint of ed- 
ucational theory and practice. The work includes a brief presenta- 
tion of physiological psychology, a study of the nature and func- 
tion of mental processes, with special emphasis on perception, ap- 
perception, memory, association, imagination, thought, induction, 
deduction, feeling, emotion, instinct, interest, attention, will, habit, 
character. Reading course required. 

References: Thorndike, James, Dewey, Titchener, Angell, Pills- 
bury, Munsterberg, Miller. 

Junior Class. 

History of Education. A study of the educational ideals, prac- 
tices and tendencies of the past, the great educational reformers, 
and the principles derived from them, the origin and development 
of modern educational theory and practice. The course embraces 
a study of oriental, classical, mediaeval and renaissance education, 
the educational theories of Comenius, Locke, Rousseau, Pestalozzi, 
Froebel, Herbart, Spencer, present tendencies in education, modern 
schools systems, and the American public school. Reading course 
required. 

References: Monroe's Brief Course in History of Education, 
Hoyt's Studies in the History of Modern Education, Graves's Great 
Educators of Three Centuries. 

Principles of Teaching. The meaning of education, of the school, 
of the curriculum; the place of instinct, interest and attention in 
the teaching process; principles of teaching based on the laws of 
association, dissociation, apperception, memory, thought, action. 
Reading course required. 

References: Henderson's Principles of Education, Bolton's Prin- 
ciples of Education, Jones's Principles of Education, Bagley's Edu- 
cational Values. 

Child Study. Attention is given to the foundations of child study 
in other sciences, and to the more general, permanent, and prac- 
tical truths thus far revealed by students of children, particularly 

30 



regarding their physical nature, growth, development; instincts, 
heredity, individuality; abnormalities and defects, with methods 
of remedy; tests and measurements; meaning of infancy, periods 
of childhood; suggestion, habit, moral development, influences affect- 
ing personality. 

References: Kirkpatrick's Fundamentals of Child Study, Eowe's 
Physical Nature of the Child, King's Psychology of Childhood, 
Sully's Studies of Childhood, Hall's Adolescence, Grigg's Moral 
Education, Tyler's Growth and Education. 

The Lesson, Observation, Teaching. Study of the nature, struc- 
ture, function, and place of the lesson; the working of the child's 
mind on the progress of the lesson; the development and formulation 
of principles underlying the recitation, the work of the teacher in 
stimulating and guiding the child's activity; making lesson plans 
and teaching lesson wholes under sympathetic and constructive 
criticism; methods of presenting subject matter; observation of a 
variety of type lessons with reports and discussions. 

Four periods a week should be kept free for observation in the 
Training School. 

Senior Class. 

General and Special Methods. The aim of education, province 
of method, general principles underlying method; the recitation; the 
organization of subject matter and special methods of teaching 
Reading, Spelling, Language, Grammar, Arithmetic, History, Civics, 
Geography, Nature Study, Drawing, Physiology, Physical Training, 
and the correlation of subjects in the course of study. 

This course continues observation and discussion of type les- 
sons taught in the Training School and in the Rural School. 

Two periods in the morning and one in the afternoon should be 
reserved for observation and practice. Reading course required. 

References: McMurray's series of works on method. 

School Management and Supervision. The aims; the teacher, 
qualifications and preparation; course of study, daily program, classifi- 
cation, promotion; incentives, coercives; records and grading; 
character building; special emphasis upon the rural school in relation 
to the general rural problem. Reading course required. 

References: Button's School Management, Foght's The Amer- 
ican Rural School, Bagley 's Class-room Management, Arnold's School 
and Class Management. 

Observation and Practice Teaching. Connected with the State 
Normal School is a well organized, thoroughly equipped Training 
School of eight grades, which serves both as a school of observation 
and as a school of practice for student-teachers. Two periods in the 

31 



morning and one in the afternoon should be reserved throughout the 
year for observation and practice teaching. Observation is begun 
in the Junior year and continued throughout the Senior year. 

As a means of helping to raise the standard of the rural schools 
of the state to meet the social and economic needs of modern rural 
life, a rural school has been established in connection with the 
Training School, in which student-teachers are given an opportunity 
to study rural school problems, thereby better fitting themselves for 
efficient service in country schools. 

The members of the Senior class are required to do practice 
teaching throughout the year in the various grades of the Training 
School and to co-operate in the work of the Eural School under the 
supervision and guidance of the head of the department of Pedagogy 
and the Principal of the Training School, with the sympathetic and 
constructive criticism of skilled critic teachers. Before teaching, 
detailed lesson plans are prepared and submitted for criticism. 

Reading Courses and Current Educational Literature. In addi- 
tion to the regular course of study in this department, courses of 
reading are offered, based upon professional material at hand in 
the pedagogical department of the Carnegie Library of the State 
Normal School. A score or more of current educational periodicals 
coming to the Library form the basis of bi-weekly class conferences 
throughout the Junior and Senior years. 

Conferences and Theses. In addition to the bi-weekly class con- 
ferences, the officers and teachers of the department of Pedagogy, 
the officers and teachers of the Training School, and all the members 
of the Senior class meet once a week for conference and discussion of 
the work of the Training School and vital educational problems in 
general. 

Original investigation of some important phase of education, with 
a written report thereon, is required of members of the Senior class. 

School Law. A eourse of lectures on the salient provisions of the 
laws relating to the common school system of the state. 

Certificate Course in Pedagogy. 

A two-year course is offered by this department for the benefit 
of students whose time may be limited, or whose scholarship may be 
irregular or advanced. A certificate will be awarded upon the satis- 
factory completion of all the work of the department, together with 
such other subjects as may be prescribed by the head of the depart- 
ment. 

For admission into this special course, applicants must present 
evidences of scholarship equivalent to that required for admission 
into the Junior class. 

32 



--i. 




THE TRAINING SCHOOL. 



The purpose of the Training School is to give the Juniors and 
Seniors of the State Normal School an opportunity to observe and 
apply the best theories and methods in education, with the idea of 
putting these into practice in the schools of Georgia. 

The Training School is amply equipped with a shop, a gymnasium, 
a kitchen, and a dining room, and the different class-rooms are well 
equipped with modern appliances. 

The school is a well organized one of eight grades, and the course 
of study is planned to meet present needs in the life of the child 
and to suit the interests of the various periods of ehild development. 
The work, so far as is practicable, is based upon present day indus- 
tries, and especially the industries which are taught in the school: 
Cooking, Gardening, Sewing, and Manual Training. In addition to 
the industries named, the course of study includes Reading, "Writing, 
Spelling, Drawing, Painting, Language and Grammar, Literature, 
Elementary Science, Geography, Arithmetic, Algebra, History, Music, 
and Physical Training. 

Before any student is permitted to do practice teaching in the 
Training School, the equivalent of academic and professional work 
as given in the Junior class of the State Normal School must be 
satisfactorily completed. 

The Senior class is divided into two sections; one section teaches, 
while the other section observes and makes plans for teaching. 
Practice teaching is done four days a week — sixteen lessons forty-five 
minutes in length, constituting a month's teaching. Regular Seniors 
are required to teach three and one-half months. 

Before teaching in the Training School each student-teacher is 
assigned a grade and a subject for one month, and is required to 
make, for her teaching, detailed plans which must be submitted to 
the critic teacher for correction. After the teaching assignment 
is made, four plans each week must be submitted to the critic teacher 
in charge, and eight plans must be accepted before any student- 
teacher will be permitted to teach. 

Before taking charge of any grade, the student-teacher must 
observe at least eight lessons in the grade in which she is to teach, 
and preferably eight lessons in the subject which she is to teach. 
She must learn each child of the grade by name, and must learn the 
regular critic teacher's method of managing the grade. 

The practice teaching is done under the supervision of the critic 
teacher, the Director and the Principal of the school exercising general 
supervision. 

In rating the student-teacher's ability, the critic teacher con- 
siders the following points, or similar ones: 

83 



1. General intelligence, knowledge of the subject matter, ability 
to select vital points in a lesson and to concentrate teaching about 
these points. 

2. Earnestness, persistence, promptness, responsiveness to sug- 
gestions, attitude toward criticism, helpful school spirit. 

3. English expression, culture, courtesy, neatness, voice, carriage,, 
poise, and confidence. 

4. Ability to manage children, getting and holding attention, 
handling disturbing elements, keeping all children profitably em- 
ployed. 

5. Initiative in planning, securing and using adequate materials, 
care of materials, care of the room. 

6. Modes of conducting recitations, economizing time, definite 
purpose and end in view, correction of the children's English. 

The Rural School Problem. 

Modern educational thought has centered about the city school; 
social and economic forces have developed the city more rapidly than 
country to the city, thereby retarding the growth of the country school 
and country life in general. 

It is our purpose with a model building and modern equipment 
to help in adjusting the rural school to the agricultural and domestic 
life of the country; to demonstrate ways in which a rural school may 
be the social center of community life; to adjust the course of study 
to rural conditions and interest; to study the problem of the con- 
solidation of schools, and to show what may be done by one teacher 
in carrying out a practical course of study. 



ENGLISH. 



Common School Methods Class. 

Language and Grammar: This course embraces a thorough review 
of the principles of English grammar and a discussion of the best 
methods of toaching the subjects of Language Lessons and Grammar. 
The adopted texts will be used as guides in this work, and the 
students will be shown how to use these books to the best advantage. 
Radical changes have been made in the nomenclature and form of 
definition in English Grammar, and teachers using the new textbooks 
will find themselves on unfamiliar ground, unless they have previous 
study and instruction. 

34 



Review Class. 

Composition: This course is for those students who are not suffi- 
ciently acquainted with the rules for use of capitals and punctuation, 
and the principles governing the correct choice and use of words, the 
proper construction and arrangement of sentences and paragraphs, 
and the uses of the various forms of spoken and written discourse to 
take up the study of formal rhetoric in the Freshman class. 

Literature: American Literature is studied by this class. Em- 
phasis is placed on the study of the literature itself instead of the 
biographies of the authors or criticisms of their works. The purpose 
is to cause the students to appreciate and love literature. 

Classics for careful study: Irving 's Sketch-book, Bryant's Thana- 
topsis, Webster's Bunker Hill Oration, Emerson's Essays, Whittier's 
Snowbound, Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal, "Weber's Southern Poets. 

Classics for reading and reports: Franklin's Autobiography, 
Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans, Longfellow's Narrative Poems, 
Hawthorne's House of the Seven Gables, Hale's A Man Without a 
Country, Whitman's Poems. 

Freshman Class. 

Rhetoric: In this class Ehetoric is studied in its relation to literary 
forms. The different qualities of style, the figures of speech, and the 
peculiarities of the various kinds of prose and poetry are studied. 
The rhetoric lessons are closely related to the lessons in literature. 

Literature: A general review of English literature is given in this 
class, the purpose being to give the student a knowledge of the his- 
torical position and relative importance of the leading English 
authors and the characteristics of their chief works. 

Classics for careful study: Shakespeare's The Tempest, Milton's 
L'AUegro and II Penseroso, Boswell's Life of Johnson, Gray's Elegy 
in a Country Churchyard, Goldsmith's Deserted Village, Selections 
from Burns, Wordsworth, Shelley, and Keats^) Coleridge 's Ancient 
Mariner, Scott's Lay of the Last Minstrel, Selections from DeQuincy 's 
Essays, Carlyle 's History of the French Revolution, Tennyson 's Idyls 
of the King, and Browning's Poems. 

Classics for Reading and Reports: Shakespeare's Merchant of 
Venice, Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress, The Sir Roger de Coverly 
Papers, Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, Swift's Gulliver's Travels, Gold- 
smith's Vicar of Wakefield, Scott's Ivanhoe, Byron's The Prisoner 
of Chillon, Lamb's Essays of Elia, Dickens's A Tale of Two Cities, 
George Eliot's Silas Marner. 

Sophomore Class. 

Literature: Elements and Kinds of Literature. This course con- 
sists of lectures and studies from the works of English authors, the 

35 



purpose being to thoroughly familiarize the student with the differ- 
ences of form and content of all the various kinds of literature and 
the peculiar features of style of all the leading English authors. 

Themes: A theme will be chosen once a week from the studies 
in literature and written upon. These essays will be discussed and 
criticised in the class, particular attention being paid to the cultiva- 
tion of a correct and original style in each student. 

Industrial Sophomore Class. 

Themes: A weekly essay will be required of this class upon some 
topic assigned a week in advance. Students will be required to collect 
the material for this outside of class and to write the essay in the 
classroom under the supervision of the instructor. These essays will 
be criticised and discussed at the next meeting. 

Junior Class. 

Literature: The Principles and Progress of Poetry. The design 
of this course is to interest the student in the materials and history 
of higher English poetry; it is a simple statement of its principles 
in relation to life, conduct, and art. The poetry of art comforts, 
heartens, and uplifts. Such poetry calls for study that it may be 
understood, and so enjoyed. The student must be given a grasp 
upon the essentials necessary to appreciation, and to the formation of 
an independent judgment. Hence the discussion of the relation of 
art to nature; and of literature to art; of poetry to literature, and 
of verse and prose to poetry; of the creative expression in poetry 
proper and of its association with rhetoric and logic; of rhythm and 
metre, melody, harmony, and structural form in verse, and the 
relation of all these to the organic principles of speech; of the kinds 
of poetry, ballad and epic, reflective and descriptive recital, lyric, 
elegy, and ode, drama, pastoral and idyl, satire and philosophical poem; 
finally, of poetic tests in the appraisement of poems as they are 
studied. 

The poets studied are: Chaucer, Spenser, Milton, Dryden, Pope, 
Gray, Burns, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keaj;s, Macaulay, 
Tennyson, Browning, A rnol d, Lowell. 

The course attempts to cover as much as possible of the poetry, 
save the Shakesperian drama, as is necessary to a representation of 
the different literary periods 01 English Literature, and as an intro- 
ductory course in English Masterpieces. 

The Development of the Drama. The second part of this course 
will deal with the drama and its development. The course will com- 
mence with a Greek play, Antigone. Then several of the great 
Morality plays will be read, notably, il Everyman,' ' "The Deluge," 

36 



"Coventry Nativity Play," "Miracle Play of the Crucifixion.' ' 
This will be followed by several plays by Marlowe; then plays by 
Ben Jonson; then come the three noted plays of Sheridan and Gold- 
smith, "She Stoops to Conquer," "The School for Scandal,'' and 
"The Rivals. " These 18th century plays are followed by the 
Modern Drama. The plays of Ibsen, Maeterlinck, Barrie, Rostand, 
Hauptmann, Sudermann, Peabody, Mackaye, Yeats, Lady Gregory, 
Synge, will be studied. The plays of Shakespeare are intensively 
studied in a special course given, and in the classes in Expression. 

The purpose of the course is to familiarize the student with the 
great body of dramatic literature; to cultivate his taste, that he may 
learn to discern between the good and the poor; and to give him 
a knowledge of dramatic construction. 

Senior Class. 

English Grammar: This is a course in advanced English grammar 
based upon Mr. Sanford's text for the high schools of Georgia. All 
the difficult points in technical grammar will be discussed with the 
class and abundantly illustrated. 

Literature for Common Schools: This course is designed to train 
teachers in teaching literature to little children by means of short 
poems and entertaining stories. Students will be drilled in the 
memorizing of simple poems and the telling of stories especially 
chosen for each grade of the common schools. 

Scudder's Fables and Folk Stories, Longfellow's Hiawatha, 
Hawthorne's Wonder-book, Hyde's Favorite Greek Myths, Defoe's 
Robinson Crusoe, Scudder's Legends of the Middle Ages will be 
studied. 

Special Course for a Certificate in English. 

Required: All the English offered in the Freshman, Sophomore, 
Jnnjor and Senior years, or its equivalent, 13 units; Expression, 
Junior and Senior, 8 units; Psych ology , Sophomore, 3 units; Latin, 
two years, 4 units; History, Freshman and Sophomore, ;"> uuits; One 
modern language, two years, 4 units. The following additional courses 
in Literature: Junior, first half, History of the Novel, 2 units; 
Junior, second half, Shakespeare, 2 units; Senior, first half, Browning 
and Tennyson, 2 units; Senior, second half, History of the Essay, 2 
units; Total, 45 units. 

History of the Novel: A half-year course, covering the develop- 
ment of the novel from the mediaeval romance to the present time. 
Students will be required to make reports to the class on one repre- 
sentative novel from each separate stage of the development. 

37 



Text: Raleigh's The History of the Novel, two periods a week, 
first half, Junior year. 

History of the Essay: A half-year course on the development of 
the essay from the days of Francis Bacon and Montaigne to the work 
of Elbert Hubbard. 

Two periods a week, second half Senior year. 

Text: Bronson's English Essays. 

A Course in the Intensive Study of Shakespeare. This course will 
present Shakespeare as the Great Dramatic Artist. It will carry on 
the work of the regular Junior class for the second semester, the 
Development of the Drama. The attention will be concentrated upon 
one supreme master of the art. The studies will include: 

I. A Study of the Raw Material in the Romantic Drama; A Study 
in Dramatic Workmanship; A Study in Underplot; A Study in Plot; 
Studies in Character-Interpretation, in Character-Contrast, and in 
Character-Grouping; A Study in Character and Plot; A Study in 
Central Ideas; A Study in Dramatic Coloring; Technical Analysis 
of Plot. 

II. The plays .studied: "The Merchant of Venice"; "Richard 
HI"; "Macbeth"; "Julius Caesar"; "Lear". 

Two periods a week, second half Junior year. 

Text Used: "Shakespeare As a Dramatic Artist." 

A Course in the Study of the Poetry of Browning and Tennyson. 
This course continues and extends the work offered in the Junior Class, 
English Poetry, its principles and progress, intensifying the study of 
poetry in the works of two great poets — Tennyson and Browning. 

The work offered includes: 

(a) The life and place in literature of each poet. 

(b) Reading and study of the principal poems of both poets. 

(c) A study of the Monologue; especial attention to the Dramatic 

Monologue, brought to its perfection by Browning. 

(d) Comparison of the poetry of the two poets. 
Two periods a week, first half Senior yeaT. 

Texts Used: Poems of Tennyson, No. 44, "Everyman's Library"; 
Poems of Browning, Nos. 41 and 42, "Everyman's Library"; Brown- 
ing and the Dramatic Monologue. 



EXPRESSION. 



The object of this department is to produce effective readers 
and speakers, and competent teachers of the subject of reading; 

as 



to substitute simple, natural methods of expression for the faulty 
delivery which commonly prevails. The aim is to supply to those 
who use the voice a course as scientific and thorough as can be found 
in any phase of education; to supply a course which is conducive 
to health; and to add a personal accomplishment. The scope of the 
work is indicated by the following outline of courses: 

Junior Class. 

Lessons in Articulation — freedom of organs of speech; placement; 
accurate moulding of the elements of speech; pronunciation. 

Vocal Technique — breath control; development of resonance; 
placing of tones; purity; tone projection; flexibility; compass; smooth- 
ness; power, and brilliancy of tones; freedom. 

Texts used: Phillip's Natural Drill in Expression, and Evolution 
of Expression — the sixteen progressive and graded steps through 
which the pupil may be brought to a realization of the criteria of 
the teacher. Study of selections from the great orators, essayists, 
dramatists, and poets, illustrative of these sixteen steps; the meaning 
of the steps, and their relation and interdependence; drill work and 
application to the individual need of the pupil. The methods of 
instruction in this course are based upon the fundamental laws ac- 
cording to which the mind unfolds. The work is fundamental, be- 
cause it develops something in the pupil's mind power at every step; 
and practical, inasmuch as his practice is constantly tested by his 
ability to move his audience. 

Literary Analysis — fundamental principles of expression; intel- 
lectual conception; development of power to read ideas; training 
of the eye; cultivation of simple emotions; series of studies for de- 
velopment of directness; practical exercises for cultivation of an- 
imation in reading and speaking, and in naturalness and simplicity; 
relation of reader to audience; commanding attention; intensity of 
expression; development of momentum; studies in light and shade; 
subtlety; studies in fulfillment of author's purpose; studies in atmos- 
phere. 

Dramatic interpretation, and presentation of scenes from the 
best dramatists. Richard II, Richard III, Julius Caesar, As You 
Like It, The Merchant of Venice, Romeo and Juliet and Twelfth 
Night. 

Senior Class. 

To some extent, time during this year must be given to methods, 
in order to prepare the students for teaching. This part of the work 
will consist in methods for Primary and Grammar grades, and will 
include lectures, discussions, and practical illustrative exercises. 

39 



Some of the phases of reading studied are: the relation of reading 
to other studies in the curriculum; methods of getting good reading; 
enunciation and pronunciation; phonics; pitch, inflection, modulation, 
model work; the development lesson; conduct of the reading lesson; 
emphasis of the importance of good oral reading on the part of the 
teacher. 

The Senior work will also include Prose Forms and Poetic Inter- 
pretation — expressive study of Description and Narrative; Epic, 
Lyric, and Dramatic poetry, with special reference to the needs of 
the interpreter. Drill on steps of advanced criteria of expression. 
A study of all reading books adopted by the State of Georgia. 

Dramatic study and interpretation, plot, character study, and 
presentation of scenes from Shakespeare, and from modern dramatists^ 
as Ibsen, Eostand, Hauptmann, Maeterlinck, Yeats. Thorough study 
of Browning and the Dramatic Monologue. 

Required reading: Hamlet, Othello, Lear, and Macbeth. 

Methods Class. 

The work offered to students taking the course in Methods is de- 
signed merely to give directions and suggestions as to how the work 
of teaching reading should be conducted. There is no attempt to 
instruct in formal reading. To this end, the work is concentrated 
upon methods; devices; drills in phonics, marking words diacritically; 
discussions as to best ways of presenting various lessons in the reading 
books adopted by the State of Georgia; length of time necessary for 
the development of a child's powers to read intelligently and smooth- 
ly; story telling, its benefits and uses; dramatics for grades; school 
plays; and kindred subjects. 

The work will be systematically presented, and it is hoped that 
much valuable material will be presented, and that the students will 
derive great help in the teaching of the subject. 



MATHEMATICS. 



Common School Methods Class. 

Arithmetic. A course in Methods designed for teachers. 

Review Class. 

1. Algebra. An elementary course, offering a thorough and mod- 
ern treatment of the most essential topics. Students entering upon 
this course are supposed to have had one year of Beginner's Algebra. 

40 




WINN! E DAVIS PORTK " 



2. Arithmetic. In this course emphasis is placed upon the funda- 
mental principles and processes and a thorough drill upon the most 
practical topics, including numerous industrial problems. 

ACADEMIC COURSE. 

Freshman Class. 

1. Plane Geometry. Four Books. In this course exercises requir- 
ing the use of instruments are introduced from the first. Demon- 
strations of theorems in the text are immediately followed by ap- 
plications in practical and original exercises. 

2. Advanced Algebra. A second course, offering a broader and 
more advanced treatment than is given in elementary courses, includ- 
ing graphs of linear and of quadratic equations, determinants, theory 
of exponents, quadratics of two variables, etc. 

Sophomore Class. 

1. Solid Geometry. The work of the course centers about mensura- 
tion and is very practical, special attention being given to actual 
measurements and constructions in the mensuration of surfaces and 
solids. The course is planned to develop and give a clear understand- 
ing of many of the rules and processes of arithmetic and is important 
for teachers whose business it is to know the why as well as the 
how of processes in mathematics. A full set of dissected solids is 
supplied and serves to add interest and give the work a concrete 
basis. 

2. Advanced Algebra. Completed. The course outlined in the 
Freshman class is completed in this class, and is correlatel with the 
other work and is made a very essential part of it. Problems are 
given for arithmetical and algebraic solution, formulas deduced, the 
use and advantage of logarithms are taught, the student and pros- 
pective teacher is led to see the unity of the subjects of element ary 
mathematics, as well as the relations of these subjects, one to another, 

Junior Class. 

1. Trigonometry. This course emphasizes the practical side of the 
subject, including drawing to scale in plotting areas, calculating 
heights and distances, field practice In the use of simple instruments, 
etc. 

2. Arithmetic. A course in subject matter and method designed 
especially: (1) for those who apply for a certificate 80UfM in Mathe- 
matics and, (2) for students who feel the need of sm-h a course as a 
preparation for teaching, or who are from Eigh Behooll that do not 
offer a review in Arithmetic. 

41 



Senior Class. 

1. Analytic Geometry. An elementary course. Prerequisite: 
Course 1 in Junior class. 

2. Elementary Mathematics. A course in reviews and methods to 
meet the needs of students who desire a certificate from this depart- 
ment and of others who desire special preparation for teaching these 
subjects . 

INDUSTRIAL COURSE. 

Freshman Class. 

1. Elementary Form and Concrete Geometry. Use of protractor 
and pencil compass in constructions. 

2. Shop Problems, requiring application of principles and processes 
of Arithmetic, Algebra, and Geometry, as a partial preparation for the 
requirements of the Industrial Course. 

Sophomore Class. 

1. Bookkeeping. In this course emphasis is placed upon the keep- 
ing of home and farm accounts during the first semester. During the 
second semester, single and double entry bookkeeping are taken up in 
a formal but practical way. 

2. Business Arithmetic, including home and farm problems, is 
carried along with the course during the year. 



CERTIFICATE COURSE. 



This course will be required of students who apply for a Certi- 
ficate in Mathematics, subjects other than those named below being 
elected by the student in consultation with the head of the Depart- 
ment of Mathematics, to complete the minimum number of periods 
per week required in each class of the Academic Course. 

Freshman Class. 

Algebra 2 

Geometry 4 

English 4 

Physics 3 

History 3 

42 



Equivalent work done in University accredited High Schools, (or 
higher institutions) will be accepted in this course through the 
Freshman class of this school, but in the higher classes, examinations 
will be required in the Mathematics of the course. 

Sophomore Class. 

Geometry 4 

English 4 

Chemistry 4 

Psychology 3 

Junior Class. 

Trigonometry 2 

Arithmetic 2 

Also the professional work required in the Department of Pedagogy. 

Senior Class. 

Analytic Geometry 2 

Reviews and Methods in Elementary 

Mathematics 2 

Also the professional work required in the Department of Pedagogy. 



ELEMENTARY SCIENCE. 



Common School Methods Class. 

Physiology. The work is based upon the texts adopted for use 
in the State; the aim is to teach the methods best adapted to affect 
helpfully the life of the pupil. 

By means of recitations, lectures and demonstrations pupils will 
be shown how to teach the functions of Contractility, Support, 
Alimentation, Excretion, and Nervous Control in the human body. 
The structure of the organs involved is studied by means of speci- 
mens, models, diagrams, stereopticon slides, and the microscope, and 
the use of all these will be actual, not theoretical. 

Special emphasis will be given to Hygiene and Sanitation that 
happiness and efficiency may be promoted. 

Freshman Class. 

Physics. 

Scope: Study of Measurement, Properties and Phenomena of Air 
and Water, Force, Motion, Energy, Heat, Work and Machines, Sound, 

43 



Light, Magnetism and Electricity; Relation of these to Life and 
Progress. 

Laboratory Work: One hundred experiments, more or less, ac- 
quainting pupils with interesting and valuable applications of physical 
laws; answering questions by trial, gaining skill in doing, training 
the power of interested observation. 

Method: Text book to teach study, experiment to develop sight 
and sense and give clearer ideas; to train the pupil to see and to 
understand — to answer the questions, what? and why! Much has been 
done for a person when he has formed the habit of asking and 
answering these two questions; science is the most fertile field for 
the development of this practical intelligence. 

Means: The school has a good laboratory equipment and supply 
of apparatus for purposes of illustration. Pupils are trained in get- 
ting acquainted with forms and forces around them. They also learn 
to make simple devices to use in schools where no apparatus can be 
bought. 

Motives: To appreciate the world, the forces with which it is 
filled and the way in which man has used them; to understand the 
physical basis of our present day civilization and teach our depend- 
ence upon machine and force; to show that man must choose be- 
tween Science and Savagery; to direct the attention of the pupil 
to the wisdom shown in every property of matter and characteristic 
of every force, bringing the pupil face to face with the fact of 
abundant wisdom and goodness. 

Sophomore Class. 

Chemistry. 

Scope: Elements and Inorganic Compounds are studied with 
enough theory to make the work have meaning. In addition to the 
regulation study of organic Chemistry attention is given to the saving 
of wastes in home and on the farm, and practical uses are carefully 
studied. Pupils are taught the relation the subject of Chemistry has 
to comfort and to civilization. Stains, fumigation, tests for impuri- 
ties in food and drink are sample topics treated. 

Theory: Mental drill can be found in any study, but the mental 
powers are exercised in different ways by abstract studies and by 
those dealing with realities more directly. Science is the proper 
source for material used in language and tho best field for the 
application of Mathematics. 

44 



Means: In the laboratory pupils are taught to do; action is the 
law of real learning. A good equipment, a manual, and faithful prac- 
tice under criticism develop practical efficiency. 



HISTORY. 



The Department" of History aims to give such knowledge of the 
past as is essential to the understanding of life today, to train 
students in accuracy of study, in the use of library references, and 
in the expression of trustworthy opinions on facts, to furnish train- 
ing and experience in methods of historical teaching to the future 
teachers of Georgia. 

General Requirements of all Classes. In addition to the text, re- 
quired readings and reference work are assigned in every class and 
all History work will be tested by regular written assignments. 

Common School Methods Class. 

A class for the training of teachers in the use of the State 
adopted texts. 

Prerequisite. A knowledge of the subjects treated. It is useless 
for any teacher to enter this course without an elementary know- 
ledge of the required subjects, as subject matter will not be a part 
of the work of the class. 

Aim: To enable teachers to understand and use their texts in the 
most efficient and approved methods. 

Review Class. 

An elementary course in English History. 

Aim. A sound and thorough knowledge of the facts of English 
governmental growth as a basis for our own history. 

Freshman Class. 

An elementary course in Ancient History. 

Aim. This course will lay the foundation for the proper under- 
standing of history and civics with emphasis on the origins of law, 
government, and culture. 

45 



Sophomore Class. 

An elementary course in Mediaeval History. 

The aim of this course is a thorough understanding of the origin 
of great institutions. 

Junior Class. 

An elementary course in Modern History. 

The aim of this course is an understanding of the formation of 
nations with special emphasis on the growth of democracy. 

Senior Class. 

A course in IT. S. History. 

The aim of this course is to understand the origins of our own 
nation, and to gain some familiarity with the sources of history. 
The course will consist largely of the use of library references which 
will be tested by written abstracts. 

For a certificate with History as a major, additional History 
courses will be offered with work in. Geography, Economics, Civics, 
English, and Psychology as may be recommended by the head of 
the department. Special courses however cannot be offered to classes 
of less than ten. 



GEOGRAPHY. 



Geography is now recognized as a collegiate study in the best 
schools of this and foreign countries. All of the important train- 
ing schools of college rank in Germany and France offer advanced 
work along this line. The demand for a thorough and more ex- 
tensive knowledge of earth formations and earth conditions that 
have controlled man's civilization is strongly felt in the educational 
life of today. The Normal School offers a regular course in geog- 
raphy to prepare the teacher for the usual requirements of the 
state common schools. 

Common School Methods Class. 

The aim sought in this geography course is to give a general 
review of primary geography, emphasizing the great world movements 
in their relations to man's development. A thorough familiarity of 

46 



geographic fact and data is necessary to a right teaching of the sub- 
ject. 

Review Class. 

A thorough study of the physical and economic features of 
geography will be undertaken in the Keview Class. Plant and animal 
distribution, natural resources and food supply, constructive material 
areas and manufacturing possibilities will be treated as fully as time, 
will permit. Laboratory work will be required. 

Freshman Class. 

Advanced physiography in its more detailed application to the 
United States will be given in this class. The natural forces that 
have made and modified the conditions under which we live will be 
studied. Special attention will be given to the subject of Georgia 
geography. 

Junior Class. 

A brief course in practical economics open to all young men in the 
school. The course is intended to treat economic phases of home, 
school and state life. Conditions and phases of rural growth will be 
discussed, plans for the betterment of civic conditions will be out- 
lined. Geographic factors governing the location of productive areas, 
the development of home and state industries, laws of sanitation, 
public improvements, and school conditions will all be treated in this 
class. A comprehensive view of present day conditions of home, 
school and state will be obtained. 



NATURE STUDY. 



Common School Methods Class. 

The work in Nature Study will cover a common knowledge of 
those natural things about us as a preparation to a fuller under- 
standing of nature's laws. As much outdoor work as is practi- 
cable will be undertaken. 

Sophomore Class. 

A general course in elementary Biology will be offered. A 
matic study of plants, their histology and economic uses, of animals 

47 



and their values to man, and of insects in relation to agriculture will 
be undertaken. As much of the work as possible will be field and 
laboratory exercises. 



AGRICULTURE. 



Common School Methods Class. 

Agriculture. The purpose of this course is not only to teach the 
elements of agriculture but to suggest methods of presenting the 
subject as well. Experiments will be made in the class room and the 
students will be taken into the fields for practical observations. 

The soil, the maintaining of soil fertility, the improvement of plants 
and animals, pruning, grafting, commercial fertlizers, balanced rations 
and the testing of milk are some of the subjects that will be studied 
in this course. 

INDUSTRIAL COURSE. 

Freshman Class. 

Agricultural Botany. Emphasis will be placed on the practical and 
experimental phase of botany. For example, the composition and 
structure of the seed, the effects of cross fertilization and its relation 
to plant improvement will be carefully considered. 

Seed, germination and growth, roots, stems, the flower and its 
function and the relation the plant bears to its surroundings, are 
some of the headings for the subject matter in this course. 

Sophomore Class 

Soils. In this course two periods per week are given to class room 
work, using a text book as a basis, and one laboratory period is taken 
each week for experiments with various soil types. 

The principal part of the course will include studies in soil forma- 
tion, types of soils, soil water, the effects of plowing and tillage, the 
maintaining of soil fertility and commercial fertilizers. 

Field Crops. A detailed study will be made of corn, cotton, and 
oats. One double period each week will be used for school garden 
work. 

The structure, the composition, the different varieties, how to im- 
prove them, the soils best adapted to the growth, the cultivation, the 
harvesting and their enemies will be carefully considered. 

48 



Junior Class. 

Fruit Growing: The location of an orchard, planting, tillage and 
orchard management. Students will be required to do some pruning, 
grafting and budding. 

Vegetable Gardening. The selection of a garden site with refer- 
ence to soil, conveniences, drainage and general effect will be con- 
sidered. The planning of a garden, the fertilizers to be used and 
the vegetables adapted to the South will also be discussed. 

Animal Husbandry. The relation of farm animals to agriculture 
and the relation of diversified farming to soil fertility. Cattle, horses, 
sheep, etc., with a careful study of the dairy cow and the care that 
is necessary for the best results. The amount and composition of 
milk, the Babcock, milk test and balanced rations will be studied 
in this course. 

Poultry. The importance of poultry raising, size and location of 
houses and the characteristics of the different breeds. Practical work 
will be given in the care and feeding of poultry as well as the operat- 
ing of incubators and brooders. 

Senior Class. 

Farm Management. Farm plans, including size and location of 
fields, buildings, fences, roads, different types of farming, labor, owner- 
ship and rental, market problems, cooperation, records and accounts 
will constitute the greater part of this course. 

Plant Breeding. The greater part of this course will be given to 
the study of the meaning of domesticated races and the manner of 
improvement, and will deal largely with plants, though references 
will be made to animals to show comparisons. 

Natural selection, artificial selection, variation together with the 
effects of heredity and environment. The above subjects will be 
studied with a view to the improvement of the plant. 

ACADEMIC COUKSE. 

Senior Class. 

Agriculture. This is a course in elementary agriculture designed 
to meet the needs of teachers who expect to teach the subject in com- 
mon and high schools. Suggestions* will be made as to material and 
methods. 

The course will constitute a study of the soil and its relation to 
temperature, moisture, etc., various farm crops with their care, ferti- 
lizers, fruit growing and the care and feeding of farm animals. 

49 



LATIN. 



The aim of this course is not only to obtain mastery of forms 
by insistent drills in paradigm and vocabularies with a view to 
translation, but also to secure mental discipline, improvement in 
English and the benefits to be derived from a study of the contents 
on the literary, historical, ethical and aesthetic sides. 

Review Class. 

The work in this class is planned for beginners, and for those who 
wish to review the subject. It consists of drills in forms, vocabularies, 
and in translations of simple Latin-English and English-Latin 
exercises. 

Roman pronunciation is used throughout the course. 

First Half- Year: Nuttings Primer, a simple easy text. In ad- 
dition to words found in Nepos and Caesar the vocabularies con- 
tain words used in every day life and of interest to the student. 

Second Half -Year: The work of the Primer is continued and a 
Latin Reader by same author is introduced once a week. The first 
lessons from this Reader deal with American history and narratives 
simplified from Caesar. The book is intended to lead up to Caesar. 

Freshman Class. 

First Half -Year: Grammar work with readings from Viri Romae. 

Second Half -Year: Caesar, Book IV, War with German tribes, 
Chapters 13-20; Book V, Second Invasion of Britain, Chapters 1-23; 
Book VI, Customs of Gauls and Germans, Chapters 11-28. These 
chapters are chosen because the indirect discourse passages are less 
difficult than in Book 1, and also because they are more interesting 
to the average student. 

Any text of Caesar may be used but preference is given to 
Gunnison and Harley. 

Sophomore Class 

I, II, III, Orations against Cataline; I. Orations for Achias. Sight 
reading, selections from Ovid's Metamorphoses. Composition based 
upon Cicero by Dooge. 

Junior Class. 

Work in Virgil; I, II, IV, VI, Books of Aeneid. The aim sought 
in the study of Virgil is to make the students realize that they are 

50 



studying a great literature, one to which literature in general 
indebted. Mythology. 

Senior Class 

First Half- Year. Selected Odes from Horace. 
Second Half -Year. Livy, Grammar Reviews. 



FRENCH AND SPANISH. 



FRENCH. 



A two-year elective course offered to Juniors and Seniors and 
optional with some other studies as shown in curriculum. 

First Year French — Junior Class. 

Thorough study of grammar and syntax. 

In the last part of the year, reading of French text, translation 
and the writing of lessons in French. 
Practice in conversational French. 

Second Year French — Senior Class. 

Continuation of first year in grammar and syntax. 

Translation from English into French; dictation; French com- 
position; reading of about six hundred pages of standard authors, 
classical and modern; parallel reading and conversational French. 

A third year course in French is offered to students who have had 
a two year course in French either at the Normal School or. at any 
other institution of college standing. 

This course, optional with other studies as shown in the cur- 
riculum, is in the nature of a graduate course and is conducted 
entirely in French. Students applying for this course must have a 
thorough knowledge of French grammar and syntax, a good reading 
knowledge of the language, and must be able to understand spoken 
French. 

SPANISH. 

A two-year elective course offered to Juniors and Seniors and 
optional with some other studies as shown in curriculum. 

First Year Spanish — Junior Class. 

Introductory Spanish course based upon natural method and the 
most essential rudiments of grammar. Inflections, forms, verba and 
syntax are carefully taught from the beginniug. 

51 



Translation — Eeading of easy Spanish text — practice in conversa- 
tional Spanish. 

Second Year Spanish — Senior Class. 

Continuation of first year in grammar and syntax. 

Translations from English into Spanish; dictation; Spanish com- 
position; reading of about six hundred pages of standard authors; 
parallel reading and conversational Spanish. 



GERMAN AND GREEK. 



GERMAN. 



A two-year elective course offered to Juniors and Seniors and 
optional with some other studies as shown in curriculum. 

First Year German — Junior Class. 

German I-»-l. Pronunciation; 2. Grammar and Syntax; 3. Transla- 
tion from English into German; 4 Eeading of easy German text. 

Second Year German — Senior Class. 

German II — 1. Continuation of grammatical drill; 2. Translation 
from English into German; 3. Eeading of Standard Literature in 
Prose and Poetry; 4 Sight Translation. 

GEEEK. 

A two-year elective course offered to Juniors and Seniors and 
optional with some other studies as shown in curriculum. 

First Year Greek — Junior Class. 

Greek I — 1. Special attention to Elementary Syntax; 2. Principal 
parts of about one hundred common irregular verbs; 3. Translation. 

Second Year Greek — Senior Class. 

Greek II — 1. Continuation of grammatical work; 2. The reading of 
Books I-III Xenophon's Anabasis. 



HOUSEHOLD ARTS. 



That housekeeping should be regarded as a profession, and that 
every young woman needs as definite a training for her future work 

52 



in the home as a young man does for his in the business world, are 
facts which do not require demonstration. The Department of 
Household Arts offers the opportunity for this much needed and many- 
sided training to every young woman in the State Normal School. 

INDUSTRIAL COURSE. 

Freshman Class. 

Model Sewing. Includes the making of a series of models illus- 
trating practical and ornamental stitches. Examples — hemming, darn- 
ing, patching, gathering, plackets seams, button-holes, application of 
lace, insertion and embroidery, hemstitching, featherstitching. The 
work, mounted in permanent form, must be submitted with a note- 
book to the instructor. The purpose of the course is to develop 
accuracy, neatness and skill, and to be suggestive of simple sewing 
lessons which can be given pupils in rural and graded schools. Fee, 
$2.00. 

Plain Sewing follows Model Sewing. Simple pattern drafting 
to measurement under supervision of the instructor. A series of 
simple garments are made — a cooking apron and three or four pieces 
of underwear. Materials furnished by students. 

Sophomore Class 

Elementary Cookery. Fundamental principles of cookery with 
emphasis upon right habits of work. The theory of and practice in 
the preparation of cereals, breads, pasteries, meats, fish, salads, sand- 
wiches, cakes, frozen desserts, etc. Fee, $4 per year. 

Theory of Foods. Closely correlated with Elementary Cookery. 
A lecture and recitation course including a study of the physiol- 
ogy of digestion and absorption followed by a detailed study of 
typical foods: e. g., cereals, legumes, sugars, starches, meats, milk, 
cheese, eggs, green vegetables, fruits. 

Junior Class. 

Dressmaking, Pre-requisite: Freshman Industrial Sewing or Brief 
course in Sewing. Study of patterns and design. During the year 
students will make a shirtwaist and skirt, wool dress and two dresses 
of wash material. Each student will furnish her own material for 
above. Fee, 50 cents each semester. 

Textiles. The history of clothing and its production. A stuiy 
of the four important textile fibres — cotton, flax, silk, and wo^' 
methods of manufacture, a comparison of the wearing qualities and 

53 



cost of fabrics made from them. An effort is made to develop good 
taste and judgment in purchasing materials for school and home use. 

Household Management. A detailed study of the problems con- 
nected with the heating, lighting, and ventilation of the house, dis- 
posal of wastes, division of income and keeping of household ac- 
counts; a consideration of the functions of the home in maintaining 
the health and efficiency of the family. 

Household Management, Academic Students. A general course in 
Household Management similar to the above will be required of all 
girls in the Academic course. Special attention will be given to the 
teaching of the Household Arts ic rural schools . 

Millinery. The course begins with fundamental work-stitches, 
making of bandeau, frames, bows, folds, plaitings; renovating and 
tinting. This preliminary work is followed by making a winter hat 
on a buckram frame, a spring hat of braid and a summer lingerie hat. 
Fee, $1 for practice materials. Students furnish own materials for 
hats. 

Art Needlework. This course includes simple embroidery adapted 
to school work, knitting and crocheting. Application of these 
stitches on simple articles. All materials furnished by student. 

Senior Class 

Advanced Cooking and Serving. Prerequisite: Elementary 
Cookery (Sophomore.) or Short Course (Ac). The study of and prac- 
tice in canning and preserving of fruits and vegetables, the prepara 
tion of the more difficult forms of breads, pastry, meats, salads, 
deserts, etc. 

Study of the making of menus, with practice in the serving of 
meals. The class is divided into groups of four, one of which plans 
a menu, prepares and serves a complete meal each week. The cost 
must come within a definite sum. Fee, $4 a year. 

Household Chemistry. A laboratory course including a study of 
the chemistry of water, air, fuels, soap; of the food principles and 
analysis of typical foods; experiments in artificial digestion, food 
adulteration. Fee, $1. Prerequisite: General chemistry. 

Bacteriology. A laboratory course including a study of the cell, 
molds, yeast, forms of bacteria, their distribution and relation to 
disease and the industries, disinfection, sterilizaton, incubation, 
immunity; making of culture media, staining solutions, and slides; 
use of compound miscroscope. Fee, $1. Prerequisite: General 
chemistry and physiology. 

54 



Dietetics. Prerequisite: Elementary Cookery and Food Study. 
A lecture and laboratory course. Study of energy, protein, and 
mineral requirement, effect of age, sex, and occupation on food 
requirement, infant and child feeding, diet in disease, the planning 
of menus with reference to bodily needs and cost. 

Organization and Management of Home Economic Classes. The 
history of Domestic Science in the United States, Courses of Study, 
Equipment, and Cost of Maintenance. Lecture and recitation. 

Home Nursing. Home care of the sick. What to do in emergen- 
cies, hygiene, care of children; preventment and treatment of dis- 
ease. 



OPTIONAL COURSES. 



To Academic students in any class the two following courses are 
offered. 

Cookery. Brief Course. A general course in Foods and Cookery. 
The fundamental principles of the subject will be taught and an 
endeavor made to give the student such training in the technique 
of the cooking laboratory as to enable her to teach the subject in 
Kural Schools. Fee, $1 each semester. 

Sewing. Brief Course. A course in Sewing with aims similar to 
that of the one in Cookery will also be offered to all classes of 
Academic Students. It will include the making of typical articles 
for home and school such as might be made by pupils of various 
ages in rural schools. A few articles of wearing apparel will be 
made teaching simple pattern drafting, the use of bought patterns, 
and the principles of plain sewing. An elementary study of textile 
fibers and the selection of clothing will accompany the hand work. 
Students will furnish their own materials for the garments. Fee for 
other materials $1. each semester. 



MANUAL ARTS. 



The Manual Arts Department is equipped to give instruction in 
the various phases of manual training mentioned below. The purpose 
of this Department is twofold: 

First, to send out teachers competent to teach hand work mid 
school arts in the common schools of the state. 

55 



Second, to furnish a limited course to students of other depart- 
ments who desire to take the work for its practical or cultural value. 

Teachers who can teach some phase of hand work in connection 
with the common school branches are apt to be sought for and are 
paid better salaries than those who can teach the common branches 
only. 

Freshman Class. 

1. Elementary Drawing. Theory and practice of drawing. Rep- 
resentation from nature and still life, etc., in silhouette, outline and 
mass. From plant life, careful study will be made of facts of growth, 
jointing and color. From object drawing comes study of form and 
proportion. Study of color scale and color harmonies introduced. 
Mediums for this work: Pencil, colored crayon, charcoal, ink and 
brush, water color. 

2. Handicrafts. Practical work and discussion of problems and 
processes in paper and cardboard construction, clay modeling, weav- 
ing, raffia work and basketry. 

Sophomore Class. 

1. Elementary Arts and Crafts. Mechanical drawing, leading to 
practical work in cardboard and thin wood construction. Pottery. 
Basketry. Design, constructive and decorative in connection with 
every problem. 

2. Drawing and Color, (a) Pictorial Drawing. Composition, group- 
ing of fruits and vegetables. Objects. Still life, (b) Design. 

Junior Class. 

1. Mechanical Drawing. In connection with which working draw- 
ings and designs will be carefully considered for each article to be 
constructed. 

Design applied to the making of articles of household decoration. 
The making of block prints, stencils, etc., to be used for table scarf, 
curtain, bureau covers, etc. 

2. Advanced Drawing and Color in all mediums. Design, abstract 
and concrete. Blackboard illustration. Pose drawing. 

Senior Class. 

1. Architectural Drawing applied to the making of house plans. 
Blue prints. Color scheme for interiors. Woodwork. The con- 
struction of articles for home or school use. Working drawings to 
precede tool processes. 

56 




WORK l\ M \ 



2. Advanced Course in Color Drawing and Color. Design, abstract 
and applied. 

3. Theory of History and Design. Reading required from 
magazines and books as designated by the teacher. 



SHORT COURSES. 



The following courses are offered as optionals to students who have 
only a limited amount of time for these subjects. One or more of 
these courses may be taken at the discretion of the students. 

Course No. 1. 

Drawing. Two hours (one laboratory period) a week in eleir.?n- 
tary drawing. Fee $1.50 per term. 

Course No. 2. 

Handicrafts. Two hours a week for 18 weeks on basketry and 
design. Two hours a week for 18 weeks on cardboard construction. 
Fee $1.50. 

Course No. 3. 

Advanced Drawing. Two hours a week in advanced drawing and 
color. Fee $1.50 per term. 

Course No. 4. 

Handicrafts. Wood work and Mechanical Drawing, 18 weeks. 
Clay work and Book Binding, 18 weeks. Fee $1.50. 

Course No. 5. 

Art History. Stereopticon lectures, picture study, etc. One 
single period a week throughout the year. Fee 50c. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION, 



Texts: The Evolution of Expression, Vols. I, II, III, IV, and 
Physical Education does not teach the performance of gymnastic 

57 



feats, but aims at the highest possible condition of health, through 
proper physical development. The mind and spirit are largely de- 
pendent upon the condition and cultivation of the physical nature. 
Only through harmony of body, mind and spirit can the highest degree 
of efficiency be attained. 

Requirements. 

Every student in the school is required to take the work in 
Physical Education, unless excused by a certificate from a reputable 
physician. 

Physical Examination. 

Twice a year, each students is given a careful physical examina- 
tion, with a view to correcting defects of the body, and to note the 
general health of the student, together with her physical development. 
In this connection also, a thorough examination of eyes, nose and 
throat, will be conducted by a physician. The reports of these ex- 
aminations are kept on file in the Physical Director's office and may 
be referred to at any time. 

The Director has daily office hours for the purpose of conferring 
with the students on matters pertaining to their health and physical 
welfare. All those things which make for healthy, vigorous bodies, 
are given careful consideration. 

Gymnasium Work. 

In the Senior class, normal training in regular class work is given. 
Courses in the theory and practice of children 's games, folk-dances 
and simple corrective exercises are given, together with the advant- 
age of practice teaching under the supervision of the Director of 
the department. 

In addition to the regular class work, which consists of graded 
exercises in formal and general gymnastics, special classes in "Folk 
Dancing will be organized for the benefit of those studenu who may 
desire this extra work. 

Athletics. 

The work of this department includes in addition to the regular 
indoor gymnastics, careful instruction in outdoor games and sports. 
A well equipped athletic field offers ample space for tennis, basketball, 
captain ball and similar games. A number of Field Days are given 
during the year, to encourage the students to participate in health- 
ful activities. To the victorious class in these Field Day contests is 
awarded the possession of a beautiful loving cup. 

58 



Gymnasium Suits. 

The gymnasium suit adopted by the school consists of black 
bloomers, white blouse, and black tennis shoes. Girls are expected 
to provide themselves with these suits before leaving home, so that 
there may be no delay in entering the work of this department. 



INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC. 



Kealizing the demands for better equipped Instrumental Music 
Teachers the State Normal School has within the past year, added to 
that department a Special Normal Course, the object of which is to 
fit the student (at very little cost) to teach Instrumental Music. 

Students are not only required to be acquainted with the repre- 
sentative works of the best composers, but must study the theory of 
music, harmony, history and pedagogy, and be able to analyze and . 
criticize a musical composition intelligently. 

The standard has been raised, the course carefully planned, and 
the department is well qualified to carry on the work. The advantages 
are equal to any music school in the south. 

Grading and Classification. 

Students are graded and classified according to their technical 
skill, and their general musical knowledge. They are required to 
bring with them a complete list of studies and pieces, that they 
^ay be given credit for same. 

Ensemble. 

Especial attention is given to ensemble playing. All students 
*ho study piano are required to devote a certain amount of time to 
'S line of work and to appear from time to time in public recitaL 

Teachers Certificate. 

Upon the completion of the special course in Musical Theory, 
Harmony, History, Pedagogy and the requirements of studies and 
pieces, a teacher's certificate will be granted. 

The candidate is required to render at least three numbers, 
from the world's most noted composers, in a satisfactory manner 
before a selected committee. 

59 



VOCAL MUSIC. 

This department is divided into two separate courses. 

1. Common School Music. This is a course offered two periods a 
week in the Junior and Senior classes to all Academic students. It 
seeks to give to all students preparing to teach in the public schools a 
general knowledge of the theory of music. A thorough knowledge 
of sight reading and the application of rote songs in lower grades. 

Junior Year. Sight reading of one and two part songs. Elemen- 
tary theory. 

Senior Year. Sight reading continued. Advanced theory. Rote 
singing and practice teaching. 

A special course is also given to students of the Common School 
Methods Class. 

Sight reading; Elementary theory; Eote songs and practice teach- 
ing. 

Text: New Educational course. One period every day is devoted 
to chorus singing of entire student body. 

Special chorus work is also given to anyone who desires to join the 
Glee Club. 

2. Voice Culture. This course is divided into four terms of nine 
weeks each. A small fee of $10.75 per term, is charged. This includes 
use of piano for practice. Two pupils in a class. This takes up 
the proper placing of the voice, breath control, relaxation, phrasing 
and song interpretation. 

Vocalizes — Sieber, Marchesi, Concona, and Panofka. Study oft 
best songs from modern composers and best masters. 

Requirement for Certificate. Any student, who has completed the 
Sophomore year, may secure a certificate with: Four years of satis- 
factory work in voice culture, theory, sight singing, musical history, 
piano, Italian, German or French. 

The Department of Music offers a course of private instruction 
in Piano, Voice, Violin and Harmony. The year is divided into four 
terms, nine weeks each. Tuition payable in advance at time dormitory 
fee is due. Piano practice included. Tuition when once paid will 
not be refunded. 

Piano, two periods each week $10.75 per term. 

Voice, two periods each week 10.75 per term. 

Violin, two periods each week 9.00 per term. 

Harmony, two periods each week 9.00 per term. 

60 



ORATORY. 

It is the purpose of this department to offer such a course as will 
develop the student along the line of technical skill as readear 
and speaker, and bring to him a large degree of personal culture. 

Oratory, like all other arts, is born of a natural desire to express 
what is within one's soul, the truth as one sees it. Self expression 
is necessary to growth and development. The study of Oratory is 
designed to bring to the student a realization of his own potential 
power of expression and to lead him towards attaining it; to awaken 
his mind that he may think more clearly and deeply; to cultivate 
his imagination that his sympathies may be broadened through more 
perfect understanding; to arouse and direct his emotions that he 
may give expression to the best that is within him. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 



1. Voice Training: 

(a) Articulation. Freedom of organs of speech; placement, 

accurate moulding of the elements of speech, pronunciation. 

(b) Technical Vocal Training. Breath control; development of 

resonance; placing of tones; purity; tone projection; flex- 
ibility; compass; power and brilliancy; freedom. 

(c) Expressive Voice Culture: Voice as an interpreter of mental 

states; tone color and form; relation of voice to imagina- 
tion and emotion. 

2. Literary Interpretation: 

(a) Evolution of Expression. Sixteen progressive and graded 

steps through which the pupil may develop his own powers 
of expression through voice, gesture, and presence. Selec- 
tions from great orators, essayists, dramatists and poets, 
illustrating these steps, the meaning of the steps, their 
relation and interdependence. 

(b) Literary Analysis. 

(c) Analytic Study and Presentation of Plays. 

(d) Dramatization of Novels and Short Stories. Arrangement of 

Novels and Short Stories for Eecital. 

(e) Recitals. 

3. Story Telling: 

Principals of Story Telling: Purpose of story; psychological 
reasons for selected stories for different periods of childhood. 

4. Extemporaneous Speaking and Prepared Addresses. 

5. Gesture. Responsive I>rill: Pantomime. The Emerson System of 

Physical Culture. 

61 



The foregoing course is offered to those desiring special work in 
Oratory, and will be given in two individual lessons a week through- 
out the year. The course is designed to cover two years of study. 
Students completing the course will be given a certificate. 

A fee of $9.00 for nine weeks will be charged pupils in this 
department. 

Texts: The Evolution of Expression, Vols. I, II, m, IV and 
selected material from classic and standard authors. 



BIBLE COURSE. 



The purpose of this course is to give such a general knowledge of 
the Bible as will furnish to the students a back ground for future 
work in detail. 

The lessons are arranged for systematic daily readings, begin- 
ning with Genesis and on through the Bible. Weekly quiz reviews 
are held on these readings bringing out such points as every person 
ought to know about the great Book. 

The aim of the teachers in presenting these lessons is to bring 
the students into loving acquaintance with God's Word. The course 
covers four years. 

The First Year's course embraces the Law and History of the 
Hebrew Nation as found in the Bible from Genesis to Esther 
inclusive. 

The Second Year's course is a study of the Poetry and Prophecy 
of the Bible, beginning with the book of Job and extending through 
the Old Testament. 

The Third Year's Course is the Life of Christ on the historical 
study of the four Gospels. These lessons are so arranged as to bring 
together the corresponding parts of the four Gospels for comparison. 
There is no attempt made to study these parts critically but simply 
to present the facts as given by the four writers. 

The Fourth Year's course is a study of the Acts of the Apostles, 
of the Epistles and of Eevelation. 

This course is entirely optional, but all students are encouraged 
to join one of these classes and due recognition is given their work 
in the permanent records of the school. 

The Bible classes are taught by members of the Faculty. During 
last year the enrollment in all these classes was three hundred and 
eleven. 

Students are urged to keep in their respective classes in Bible 
work as in other studies. 

62 



CORRESPONDENCE COURSES. 



Teaching by mail is becoming more popular every day, and the 
facilities have now been so perfected that there is no method of 
study which equals that of the correspondence plan for giving 
depth of scholarship and accurate knowledge of the subject studied. 
The State Normal School has so arranged its courses of study that 
all correspondence students will secure full credit for the work which 
they do at home should they decide eventually to attend the Normal 
School at Athens. 

These courses are prepared by the heads of departments who 
are specialists in these branches. Directions as to text-books and 
lessons, and lists of review questions, will be sent the student. 
When the student writes out the answers to these questions and 
sends in her papers, these will be corrected and graded and again 
returned to the student. Credit will be entered upon the records 
of the State Normal School for the work done, and this credit will 
help the student, who can come to the school later and take resi- 
dent work, to obtain the diploma offered by this institution. 

The charges for the courses are as follows: 

Common School Review Courses. General Culture Courses. 

Arithmetic $5.00 Algebra $6.00 

Grammar 5.00 Geometry 6.00 

History 5.00 Latin 6.00 

Physiology 5.00 Ehetoric 6.00 

Geography 5.00 Literature 6.00 

Agriculture 5.00 English History 6.00 

Eeading 5.00 Ancient History 6.00 

Spelling 5.00 Civil Government 6.00 

Genera! Pedagogical Courses. 

Dutton's "School Management," and Georgia School Law $5.00 

A General Course on Primary Methods 5.00 

Other courses in way of preparation. 

For full particulars in regard to any of these Courses of Study, 
address the President, State Normal School, Athens Georgia. 

Lecture Course. 

The school maintains a Lyceum Course which is free to all the 
students of the school and in which are engaged the best platform 
performers we can procure. In addition to this, a series of lectures 
by prominent men and women in the state, who have accomplished 
things in the special line of work in which each is interested, is kept 
up throughout the year. 

63 



Moreover, Athens affords the school "wonderful opportunity of 
seeing and hearing those who have attained distinction along many 
lines of endeavor. The school, in fact, is at times embarrassed with 
the richness of its opportunities of this kind. But they are invaluable 
aids in giving finishing touches to the education which the school is 
striving to impart to its student body. 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS. 



The Young Women's Christian Association. 

The Young Women's Christian Association, through its social life, 
Bible study, Mission study and intercollegiate relationships, seeks to 
promote a spirit of right living among students and to train them 
for Christian work. The social work consists of introducing new 
students to the school and of assisting them in adapting themselves 
to their new friends and surroundings. The Bible study course is 
arranged to cover four years, but if as much as two years is satis- 
factorily completed credit is given. The course in Mission study is 
carefully planned and the text-books used are the newest and best, 
treating both home and foreign mission problems. Intercollegiate 
relationships have been established by delegatons to the Georgia 
State Missionary League, and the Southern Conference of the Young 
Women's Christian Association, by visits of traveling student secre- 
taries and by the interchange of reports and methods with all the 
leading schools of the South. 

Woman's Christian Temperance Union. 

In conjunction with the Young Women's Christian Association 
work of the school, there is an organized Woman's Christian Tem- 
perance Union which holds regular meetings once a month. This 
organization has done much to further the study of temperance and 
temperance questions that are pertinent to school life. 

The Altioria Literary Society. 

For the eight years of its existence the Altioria Society, by fol- 
lowing its motto has, through its high standards in literary and 
social culture, through beautifying its room and through establish- 
ing a library, reached the state of being a permanent ani neces- 
sary organization in the school. 

64 



•H3 








Si i:\ ES \ B< >UT x'l'ii RNS. 



The Mildred Rutherford Society. 

The Mildred Rutherford Society is a literary society, the aims 
of which are the cultivation of the literary sense, the betterment 
of the social life of the school and the cementing of friendships into 
strong usefulness in the future. 

The Alexander Etiquette Club. 

The Alexander Etiquette Club was organized for the purpose of 
pleasant social intercourse, for the study of pertinent questions of 
etiquette, and for the inculcation of a love of, and a stiiving for, 
the highest forms of courtesy, under all circumstancei, and in all 
conditions of life. 

The Round Table. 

The Round Table is a gathering of all the students who desire 
to attend at a regular meeting every Saturday night just when 
supper is over. The organization is nine years old and its aim is to 
furnish wholesome recreation and to develop a love for and a power 
to tell the best stories to be fond in our literature. Current topics 
are discussed, songs rendered and some pleasing story told and com- 
mented on. This organization started with but six members at its 
inception, and now has increased in size until there is no room on the 
school campus that will hold the attendance without crowding. 

The Ciceronian Debating Society. 

The Ciceronian Debating Society is an organization of the young 
men for the specific purpose of training them in debate and public 
speaking. Regular meetings are held once a week when current 
topics of vital interest are debated and declamations rendered. In 
addition to the benefits derived from public speaking, the young men 
are given considerable insight into parliamentary usage by occasional 
lectures. All of which prepares the members for duties in after life. 

The Athletic Association. 

This is an association of the students of the school for the pur- 
pose of athletic training and is under the direct supervision of the 
Department of Physical Culture. The Association has an athletic 
field well equipped with six tennis courts, two basket-ball courts 
and room for track and relay races. An annual Field Day and 
championship tennis contests are held; the winners of the young men's 
tournament are sent to the Inter-collegiate tournament in Atlanta. 

65 



The Georgia Club. 

Four years ago the Georgia Club began its work. At that time 
it was a new and unique organization in the State Normal School; 
but also it was new and unique in the schools, colleges and universi- 
ties of the whole country. 

The club numbers 216 students and faculty members, represents 
94 counties and five states. It meets regularly on Mondays at nine 
o'clock for an hour's informal, comfortable discussion of rural life. 



GRADUATE STUDENTS. 



The following schools are this year represented by graduates in 
the student body of the State Normal School: Banks-Stephens 
Institute, Butler Male and Female College, Florida Normal College, 
Gordon Institute, Glynn Academy, Georgia Normal College & Bus- 
iness Institute, John Means Institute, Knoxville Summer School, 
Lucy Cobb Institute, Luthersville Institute, Muscogee Elementary 
School, Martin Institute, Miss Hanna's School, McPhail Institute, 
Perry Rainey Institute, Presbyterial Institute, Eeinhardt College, 
Samuel Benedict Memorial School, Seventh District Agricultural 
School, South Atlantic Institute, St. Vincent's Academy, States- 
boro Institute, Third District Agricultural School, Tugalo Institute, 
Tenth District Agricultural School, Eleventh District Agricultural. 
School; and the High Schools of Adrian, Acworth, Albany, Ameri- 
cus, Ararat, Arlington, Armuchee, Athens, Bronwood, Buford, 
Cataula, Chattahochee, Climax, Cochran, Comer, Conyers, Colum- 
bus, Crawford, Dublin, Eatonton, Fayetteville, Fitzgerald, Fort 
Gaines, Gainesville, Girard, Greensboro, Gresham, Griffin, Hephzi- 
bah, Hoschton, Hartwell, Jesup, LaGrange, Lawrenceville, Livings- 
ton, Loganville, Lumber City, Madison, Marshallville, Maysville, 
McDonough, Monroe, Monticello, Oconee, Perry, Pinehurst, Quit- 
man, Reynolds, Rome, Rutledge, Sandersville, Salem Savannah, 
Sparta, Statham, Sylvania, Thomasville, Thornwell, Tifton, Una- 
dilla, Villa Rica, Waycross, Washington, Wesley Chapel, Whigham, 
Winder, Winterville, Woodbury, Wynnton, Esthervillej (Iowa), 
Sumter (S. C.) 



STATISTICS FOR 1913-14. 



Resident students registered to date (March 4, 1914) 548; students 
registered for Correspondence course 71; pupils in Muscogee Elemen- 
tary School and Country School, 184; total, 803; teachers and officers, 

66 



47; counties represented by students, 112; students holding diplomas 
from other schools, 183; students holding first-grade license, 60; 
second-grade license, 77; third-grade license, 16; students having 
experience in teaching, 125; students who earned the money they spend 
here, 118. Forty-five per cent of all our students are the sons and 
daughters of farmers. Calls on us for teachers, 1913-1914, July to 
March, 395. Total registration since the founding of the school, 
10,905, more than ninety per cent of whom have since taught in our 
common schools. Total graduates to June, 1913, 757. Graduating 
class this year numbers, 125. 

Buildings: Academic buildings, 3; Dormitory buildings, 3; Dining 
Hall and Senior Hall Building, 1; Rural School, 1; Carnegie Library, 
1; Infirmary, 1; Dairy barn, 1; Stock barn, 1; total 12. 



or 



ROLL OF STUDENTS, SESSION 1913-1914. 
Senior (Academic). 



Bethea, Susie 


Greene 


Ivey, Sudie Belle 


Newton 


Bounds, Elizabeth 


Wilkes 


Johnson, Bertha 


McDuffie 


Bowles, Velma 


Meriwether 


Jones, Linda 


Ben Hill 


Branch, Elizabeth 


Oconee 


Kelly, Emily 


Clarke 


Branan, Mattie Lou 


Putnam 


Kelly, Jane 


Clarke 


Brantley, Jillie 


Screven 


Kemp, Clebe Merze 


Sumter 


Braswell, Ruby 


Walton 


Kendrick, Margaret 


Chattooga 


Brown, C. V. 


Douglas 


Kicklighter, Jennie 


Tattnall 


Brunner, Mary 


Bibb 


Knott, Emmie 


Morgan 


Callaway, Ellie 


Clarke 


Lamb, Mary 


Bleckley 


Campbell, Myrtle 


Gwinnett 


Landrum, Ethel 


Franklin 


Castellow, Freddie Mae 


Early 


Martin, Beulah 


Clarke 


Coile, Nezzie 


Oglethorpe 


Mason, Regina 


Clarke 


Colley, Katharine 


Wilkes 


MeCranie, Clyde 


Coffee 


Collier, Lona 


Floyd 


McDaniel, Lilly 


Laurens 


Conway, Prentiss 


Clarke 


Moore, Minnie 


Jackson 


Coates, Helen Alva 


Chatham 


Moore, Jessie 


Clarke 


Copeland, Bessie 


Chatham 


Moore, Odessa 


Jackson 


Cubbedge, Grace 


Screven 


Moore, Willie 


Murray 


Crump, Orsenie 


Franklin 


Murphey, Marie 


Richmond 


Dickson, Annie Mae 


Troup 


Nelson, Mabel 


Bibb 


Dusenbery, Mrs. Nellie 


Chatham 


Newman, Dora 


Dougherty 


Eakes, Margaret 


DeKalb 


Newton, Marion 


Clarke 


Ellington, VoHammie 


Wilkes 


Nicholson, Emma Sue 


Oconee 


Floyd, Olivia 


Troup 


Olmstead, Mary 


Liberty 


Funderburk, Martha 


Pike 


Paine, Rebecca 


Clarke 


Fuss, Margaret 


Bibb 


Peterman, Ida Mae 


Colquitt 


Galphin, Eunice 


Richmond 


Pittard, Roberta 


Clarke 


Glenn, Gladys 


Clarke 


Porter, Ruby 


Jackson 


Griffeth, Clara 


Clarke 


Pound, Cora 


Jasper 


Hamilton, Lena 


Jackson 


Pound, Emmie 


Jasper 


Hawthorne, Dollie 


Gwinnett 


Pounds, Winona 


Crisp 


Heath, Thelma 


Warren 


Powell, Lizzie 


Lincoln 


Hensler, Claudia 


Walton 


Prater, Rosa Lee 


Clarke 


Hester, Nellie 


Lincoln 


Quarterman, Louise 


Oconee 


Hodges, Ruth 


Effingham 


Rumph, Lois 


Glynn 


Hogg, Jessie 


Troup 


Simpson, Marie 


Greene 


Hubbard, Cora 


Dawson 


Sisk, Evie 


Clarke 



68 



Smith, Bertha 


Talbot 


Wallace, Jeanette 


Taylor 


Smith, Marie 


Greene 


Wallace, Myrtle 


Jackson 


Smith, Nellie 


Hall 


Waller, Louise 


Hancock 


Snellings, Irene 


Elbert 


Ward, Adelaide 


Pierce 


Sullivan, Bernice 


Franklin 


Wash, Esther 


Clay 


Sullivan, Ovist 


Franklin 


Watkins, G. C. 


Talbot 


Tanner, Susie 


Gwinnett 


Webb, Fannie Lou 


Cobb 


Taylor, W. E. 


Milton 


Wells, Dollie 


Montgomery 


Thurmond, Winnie 


Lincoln 


Wilkins, Annie 


Ware 


Tribble, Lula 


Monroe 


Williams Clara 


Cobb 


Vance, Carolyn 


Gwinnett 


Wood, Mildred 


Jones 


Walker, Yeazy 


Greene 


Young, Sarah 


Polk 




Senior (Industrial). 




Bass, Annie May 


Floyd 


Kilgore, Mattie 


Carroll 


Berry, Addie 


Oglethorpe 


Peterson, Lillie 


Jackson 


Daniel, Euth Chester 


Cobb 


Quillian, Lena 


Clarke 


Davis, May Belle 


Taliaferro 


Saye, Mattie 


Morgan 


Haddock, Nancy 


Clarke 


Sloan, Timoxena 


Macon 


Hart, Dorothy 


Clarke 


Stanley, Alma 


Washington 


Hicks, Irma 


Polk 


Stoffregen, Lula 


Floyd 


Highsmith, Dollie 


Tattnall 


Tharpe, Janie 


Thomas 


Jones, Nannie 


Grady 


West, Clara 


Taylor 




Junior (Academic). 




Agnew, Pearl 


Chattooga 


Dougherty, Annie 


Wilcox 


Akin, Eunice 


Franklin 


Davis, Frances 


Clarke 


Algood, Eoy 


Paulding 


Davis, Lucile 


Newton 


Anderson, Ethel 


Jackson 


Dellinger, S. E. 


Gordon 


Bercaw, Louise 


Crisp 


Dickson, Nanz 


Franklin 


Blackstock, Myrtle 


Floyd 


Everett, Frances 


Dooly 


Bonner, Minnie 


Lincoln 


Gunn, Lillie 


Warren 


Bush, Laura 


Pike 


Hewell, Ruby 


Greene 


Cadwell, Beryl 


Wilcox 


Harrison, Jennie 


Sumter 


Carlton, Jessie 


Walton 


Hughes, Kittie 


Clarke 


Carroll, Erin 


Fulton 


Hughes, Louie 


Forsyth 


Chesser, Willie 


Gwinnett 


Holliman, Ruby 


Clarke 


Clark, Alice 


Eandolph 


Johnson, Annie Lee 


Sumter 


Collins, Annie Belle 


Macon 


"Lambert, Julia 


Clarke 


Cole, J. W. 


Paulding 


Lasseter, Mildred 


Clarke 


Clark, Annie Laura 


Harris 


Livingston, Lelia 


Newton 


Cox, Miriam 


Clarke 


McAlpine, Christine 


Habersham 


Cronic, Mayrelle 


Jackson 


McCorkle, Anna 


Clarke 


Growley, Ernest 


Paulding 


McKee, M. W. 


DeKalb 



McLeroy, Euth 


Clarke 


Schley, Grace 


Muscogee 


Marshall, Effie 


Putnam 


Smith, Susie Ellen 


Pike 


Munro, Martha 


Marion 


Stephenson, Meg 


Walton 


Moore, Lillian C. 


Wilkes 


Sterne, Dorothea 


Dougherty 


Odum, Pauline 


Newton 


Story, Evelyn 


Houston 


Osterman, Byrdie 


Charlton 


Summer, Mattie Vie 


Coweta 


Patton, Iverson 


Fulton 


Stovall, Lena 


Franklin 


Perry, Viola 


Morgan 


Smith, Elizabeth B. 


Pike 


Perry, Dollbabe 


Laurens 


Teem, Bernice 


Gilmer 


Peebles, Sue 


Maury, Tenn. 


Tucker, Annie Ashby 


Dougherty 


Pennington, Alice 


Monroe 


Weaver, Olga Escambia, Ala. 


Perry, Euth 


Gilmer 


Weisiger, Sue 


Bibb 


Poole, Lillie 


Warren 


Weldon, Inez 


Troup 


Eainwater, Cleo 


Wilcox 


Wells, Minnie 


Montgomery 


Eoberts, Janie 


Clarke 


Wheat, Pearl 


Douglas 


Eogers, Garland 


Clarke 


Wood, Lillie Mae 


Walton 


Eose, Mr. Alva 


Paulding 


Young, Augusta 


Polk 


Sanborn, MyTtle 


Sumter 


"Young, Elon 


Coweta 


Sappington, Anna 


Harris 








Junior (Industrial). 




Bradberry, Euth 


Clarke 


Mann, Winnie A. 


Meriwether 


Briscoe, Maggie 


Clarke 


Philbrick, Mary 


Habersham 


Bott, Eita 


Bibb 


Smith, Elizabeth W. 


Clarke 


Campbell, Margaret 


Clarke 


Titshaw, Chestia 


Jackson 


Groves, Myrtle 


Lincoln 


Tuck, Janie 


Clarke 


Hunter, Frances 


Clarke 


Ward, Elizabeth 


Cobb 


Kelly, Miss C. B. 


Jasper 


Wright, Sarah Anne 


Elbert 




Sophomore i 


(Academic). 




Allred, Ella 


Pickens 


Coile, Gladys 


Clarke 


Asbury, Mary Lou 


Greene 


Collins, Byrd Lee 


Macon 


Ball, Lena Mae 


Irwin 


Cook, Beatrice 


Monroe 


Bellah, Lonie 


Henry 


Cronic, Irene 


Jackson 


Belcher, Euby 


Chatham 


Davis, Dolie Iris 


Clay 


Brackett, Bertha 


Jackson 


Dickson, Edise 


Franklin 


Braswell, E. A. 


Gwinnett 


Doster, Leila Annie 


Greene 


Brunner, Hattie 


Bibb 


Eaton, Fannie 


Jefferson 


Burke, Bertha 


Floyd 


Ellison, Dessa 


Fayette 


Burke, Nina 


Floyd 


Epps, Eubie 


Newton 


Burson, Susan Marie Clarke 


Fincher, Lois 


Troup 


Chappelle, Sarah 


Pike 


Franks, Eula Lee 


Floyd 


Cheney, Dorothy 


Schley 


Fuller, Dessa 


Bartow 


Cofer, Sadie Lee 


Wilkes 


Funderburk, Annie 


Pike 



70 



Grant, Eosa 


Polk 


Nabers, Zuma 


Clarke 


Guillebeau, Clarice M. 


Lincoln 


Nabers, Ida 


Clarke 


Harmon, Edward 


Sumter 


Oxford, Amy 


Jasper 


Hasty, Ethel 


Walker 


Paris, Nelle 


Polk 


Hearn, Lottie Gertrude Walker 


East, Irma 


Brooks 


Hendricks, Freddie Kuth Banks 


Reed, Edna 


Early 


Hicks, Ruth 


Polk 


Rees, Lois 


Webster 


Hill, Viola 


Baldwin 


Rumsey, Elsie 


Franklin 


Hubbard, Bertha 


Franklin 


Sappington, Ethel 


Monroe 


Hutchins, Susie 


Gwinnett 


Shepherd, Rosalind 


Jackson 


Ivey, Mary Lizzie 


Baldwin 


Singleton, Vennie 


Forsyth 


Kendrick, Clara 


Chattooga 


Slayton, Ethel 


Harris 


Lunceford, Floy 


Greene 


Smith, W. C. 


Washington 


McLain, Cassie Mae 


Morgan 


Saunders 1 , Dita 


Terrell 


McKoy, Nannie 


Coweta 


Tanner, Ruby 


Campbell 


McMichael, Nannie Lou DeKalb 


Tarpley, Oline 


Henry 


McMurray, Perth 


Franklin 


Thomas, Annie Maude 




Mann, Pattie 


Meriwether 




Oglethorpe 


Mathews, Lucile 


Meriwether 


Thompson, Jeroline 


Coweta 


Mathews, Lilah Mae 


Oglethorpe 


Towler, Sallie Bush 


Walton 


Meadow, Stella 


Oglethorpe 


Waiter, Blanche 


Cobb 


Milton, Annette 


Pierce 


Walton, Vera 


Wilkes 


Minor, Jether 


Walton 


Wikle, Willie Mae 


Rabun 


Mitchell, Eula 


Fulton 


Williams, Essie 


Franklin 


Montgomery, Catharine 


Witcher, Lucy 


Coweta 


Spartanburg (S. C.) 


Woodward, Jane 


Troup 


Moore, Eva 


Madison 


Wyndham, Sadie 


Chatham 


Morgan, Bessie 


Harris 




. 




Sophomore i 


(Industrial). 




Alexander, Lucile Eae 


DeKalb 


Mason, Cora 


Campbell 


Bennett, Olive 


Tift 


Miller, Bessie 


Grady 


Collins, Lorine 


Douglas 


Pedrick, Cobbie 


Brooks 


Edison, Sarah Rebecca 


Speight, Lila 


Baldwin 




Oglethorpe 


Stiles, Etta 


Baldwin 


Freeman, Eunice 


Madison 


Wall, Ruby 


Gwinnett 


Hart, Charlotte 


Clarke 


Whelchel, Blanche 


Hall 


Herring, Maude 


Douglas 


Wood, Ezma Elizabeth 




Holmes, Ramona 


Dade (Fla.) 




Gwinnett 


Iverson, Elberta 


Clarke 


Young, Annie 


Clarke 




Freshman (Academic). 




Allgood, Lillie Belle 


Walton 


Brown, Golden 


Madison 


Bray, Dot 


Oglethorpe 


Burdett, Eunice 


Fulton 



71 



Burton, Gladys 


Lincoln 


Norris, Lessie 


Morgan 


Cook, Carrie B. 


Monroe 


Patrick, JAS. R. 


Walton 


Fowler, Eunice 


Clarke 


Perry, Janie 


Sumter 


Freeman, Roy 


Troup 


Petty, Fay 


Fulton 


Gardner, Alma 


Morgan 


Rogers, Georgia 


Oglethorpe 


Hammond, Erne 


Floyd 


Sale, Arthur C. 


Randolph 


Holliman, Olive 


"Wilkinson 


Shirley, Lula 


Milton 


Johnson, Nellie 


Montgomery 


Smith, Frank G. 


Walton 


Jackson, Maude 


Crisp 


Taylor, Ethel 


Crisp 


Kidd, Ruby 


Webster 


VanLandingham, Mattie Taylor 


Logan, Maude 


Jackson 


Wingfield, W. C. 


Clarke 


Marsh, Rosa 


Screven 


Wood, Alberta 


Walton 


Maxwell, Kathleen E. 


Pike 


Williford, Mattie 


Talbot 


Mercer, Martha L. 


Jones 








Freshman (Industrial). 




Barnes, Sarah Lee 


Troup 


Langston, Lessie 


Houston 


Beasley, Nannie 


Bulloch 


LaPrade, Emma 


Wilkes 


Crawford, Lottie A. 


Clarke 


McBrayer, Dora 


Carroll 


Duggan, Helen 


Hancock 


Mauck, Ollie Lee 


Fulton 


Hardy, Stella 


Berrien 


Penland, Ruby 


Clarke 


Hodges, Edna 


Screven 


Stevens, Marie 


Worth 


Jones, Ruby 


Gwinnett 


Trimble, Fannie 


Fulton 


Kinnett, Lois' 


Crisp 


Turk, Julia Ruth 


Banks 




Review (Academic) 




Binns, Maidee 


Harris 


Hill, Jewell 


Jackson 


Brand, Martha 


Cobb 


Howard, Annie Laurie 


Rabun 


Bray, Thelma 


Oglethorpe 


Kinnebrew, Lucile 


Clarke 


Busha, Marjorie 


Gwinnett 


Kittle, Olivia 


Jackson 


Butler, Sarah 


Clarke 


McEntire, Ossie 


Clarke 


Callahan, Sadie 


Greene 


Pennington, Ruth 


Wilkinson 


Callaway, Edna 


Clarke 


Pittard, Rachel 


Oglethorpe 


Conway, Harlan 


Clarke 


Poss, Thomas Walter 


Clarke 


Cooper, Rebie 


Hall 


Richardson, Pansy 


Harris 


Drake, Kathleen 


Clarke 


Shackelford, Moina 


Wilcox 


Echols, Sallie 


Oglethorpe 


Snead, Emma Katharine Coweta 


Eckardt, Helen 


Fulton 


Vandiver, Octie 


Franklin 


Ely, Menlo 


Clarke 


Walker, Bessie 


Jackson 


Fulghum, Annie 


Wilcox 


Walker, Frank L. 


Jackson 


Fincher, Esther 


Troup 


Waters, Bessie M. 


Bulloch 


Gresham, Georgia Agnes Wilkes 


Williamson, Ruth 


Clarke 


Haddock, Annie 


Clarke 







72 



Review (Industrial) 



Adams, Emma 


Fayette 


Harper, Vera 


Carroll 


Andrew, Ruth 


Houston 


Harris, Leora 


Walton 


Armistead, Jessie 


Morgan 


Hymes, Annie Belle 


Chatham 


Austin, Lucile 


Milton 


Jackson, Lydia 


Milton 


Austin, Sarah 


Milton 


Jenkins, Lota 


Worth 


Bates, Anna 


Pike 


Johnson, Musie 


Pike 


Blankinship, Worthy 


Henry 


Kimbrough, Fannie 


Morgan 


Boyett, Elma 


Randolph 


McElven. C. L. 


Bulloch 


Branch, Dorothy 


Oconee 


McGregor, Jean 


Crisp 


Britt, Essie 


Berrien 


Malcolm, Idelle 


Morgan 


Britt, W. C. 


Gwinnett 


Mayfield, Minnie 


Gwinnett 


Bryan, Lucy 


Gwinnett 


Norwood, Catharine 


Houston 


Caldwell, Leah 


Talbot 


Odum, Mamie 


Walton 


Callaway, Ida 


Clarke 


Paine, Cora 


Clarke 


Carlton, Annie M. 


Walton 


Peeples, Bertha 


Gwinnett 


Carter, Emmie 


Pike 


Perkins, Etha 


Milton 


Carter, Florence 


Pike 


Pannell, Mattie Lee 


Walton 


Colquitt, Susie 


Madison 


Poole, Amelia 


Oconee 


Coleman, Floy 


Randolph 


Prickett, Allie 


Jackson 


Cramer, Cleo 


Oglethorpe 


Pruitt, Susie 


Banks 


Crawford, Auby 


Walton 


Rehberg, Lilla 


Grady 


Curry, Sallie Mae 


Cobb 


Rogers, Florence 


Greene 


Dickerson, Abbie 


Bulloch 


Seagraves, Claude 


Madison 


Drigger, S. A. 


Bulloch 


Spratlin, Martha 


Fulton 


Durden, Vinie 


Walton 


Steadham, J. L. 


Calhoun 


Ellison, Estelle 


Fayette 


Strickland, Harvey 


Ware 


England, Cleo 


Clarke 


Thurmond, Stella 


Houston 


Gober, Mary Elizabeth 


Dawson 


Welch, Roy D. 


Miller 


Greene, Aurelia W. 


Troup 


Westbrook, Anna 


Forsyth 


Hammond, Euby 


Carroll 


Wood, Clara 


Newton 


Hampton, Sibyl May 


Clarke 








Irregular. 




Barnett, C. T. 


Oconee 


Collins, Vera 


Tattnall 


Baugh, Ellie 


Putnam 


Claxton, Sarah 


Burke 


Bowen, Willie Mae 


Tift 


Copeland, Susie 


Greene 


Bland, Frances K. 


Toombs 


Cox, Etta 


Cherokee 


Bowden, Esther 


Meriwether 


Chastain, Irma 


Cobb 


Brown, Ethel 


Clarke 


Church well, Bertie 


Bibb 


Brown, Jimmie 


Emanuel 


Chester, Maude 


Lumpkin 


Brown, Rupert 


Madison 


Downer, Henry Etta 


Clarke 


Callaway, Jennie M. 


Clarke 


Durrence, Ida 


Tattnall 


Cartee, Mattie 


Bulloch 


Elliott, Fairy A. 


Clarke 



73 



Ellison, Clara 


Fayette 


Nisbet, Sarah 


Fulton 


Elliott, Velma 


Richmond 


Perry, Gertrude 


Burke 


Ellis, Ruby 


Chatham 


Porterfield, Bonnie 


Madison 


Gober, Henry D. 


Jackson 


Rivers, Lee Ethel 


Clarke 


Holmes, Edna 


Dake(Fla) 


Sands, Ethelene 


Harris 


Har groves, Martha E. 




Sibley, Louise 


Spalding 




Oglethorpe 


Smith, Mattie Rebecca 


Fulton 


Hudson, Julia 


Greene 


Suddath, Ramelle 


Banks 


Jackson, Mollie 


Crisp 


Taylor, Mary Lee 


Dooly 


Jones, Ella 


Muscogee 


Terrell, Rene 


Fulton 


Jones, Ruby 


Appling 


Terrell, Rubie 


Fulton 


Kingsley, Lena 


Dougherty 


Tucker, Ruby 


Hancock 


Kitchen, Mrs. Lillie 


Worth 


Waggoner, Hattie Sue 


Madison 


McArthur, Velma 


Toombs 


Whitehead, Jessie 


Clarke 


McConnell, Julia 


Gordon 


Whitworth, Ossie 


Madison 


McCorkle, Marion 


Clarke 


Williams, Elizabeth 


Bulloch 


McFarlan, Eva 


Talbot 


Williams, Kittie 


Bulloch 


McKie, Mamie 


Clarke 


Williams, Lillian Lacy 


Liberty 


Marchman, Nellie 


Greene 


Wyndham, Belva 


Chatham 


McGahee, Leo 


DeKalb 


Zeigler, Miss Howell M. 


Clarke 


Newsome, Winnie 


Taylor 








Specials. 




Allen, Maude L. 


Jackson 


Hankinson, Florence 


Screven 


Avera, Olga 


Crawford 


Pace, Lorena 


Cobb 


Barrett, Mattie 


Pike 


Philbrick, Hazel Habersham 


Brown, Gertrude E. 


Tattnall 


Smith, Palmer Elizabeth 




Brown, Ruth 


Murray 




Screven 


Byrd, Rosalyn 


Fulton 


Shippey, Lucy 


Harris 


Dolan, Ada Jane 


Muscogee 


Simpson, Sarah 


Stewart 




Chatham 


Simmons, Marie 


Gilmer 


Guill, Edith 


Hancock 


Waters, Lula 


Bulloch 


Hale, Willie 


Walton 


Walls, Mattie Lou 


Murray 



74 



TRAINING SCHOOL. 
ROLL OF STUDENTS, SESSION 1913-1914. 



First Grade. 



Bishop, Sarah 
Cartledge, Cleveland 
Creekmore, Otto 
Fowler, Winifred 
Fulcher, Dorothy 
Griffin, Alta 
Hammond, May 
Jackson, J. O. 
Lawrence, Claire 



Pittman, Mildred 
Pound, Aldine 
Presnell, Georgia 
Sorrells, Clara 
Vaughn, Hall 
Wardlaw, Ealph 
Whitworth, Leonel 
Wilson, Arthur Lee 



Second Grade. 



Bondurant, Mary 
Callaway, Blanche 
Callaway, Helen 
Callaway, Herbert 
Conway, Royce 
Fleming, Marvin 
Haddock, Claudia 
Jennings, Margaret 
Kinnebrew, Ruth 
Mygatt, Ethel 



Moon, Fred 
Orr, Douglass 
Smith, Bernice 
Smith, Loyd 
Vandiver, Betsy 
Waldrop, Brantley 
Waldrop, James 
Waters, Madeline 
Whitworth, Lillie 



Third Grade. 



Bomar, Leland 
Booth, Harvey 
Bishop, George 
Chasteen, Lettie May 
Cartledge, Thomas 
Drake, Asa 
Earnest, Lewis 
Griffin, Addie 
Jackson, Lenira 
Jennings, Pattie 



Kitchen, John 
Lawrence, Genevieve 
Orr, Fritz 
Parham, Alfred 
Smith, J. B. 
Talmadge, Coke 
Wardlaw, Donald 
Whitworth, Zelma 
Waff, Howard 



75 



Fourth Grade. 



Conaway, Clarice 
Callaway, Luke 
Hughes, Mildred 
Kenney, Lawrence 
Mygatt, Ruth 
McLeroy, Geneva 
Orr, Donald 



Presnell, Clara 
Slaughter, Fain 
Seymour, Eunice 
Simms, Eunice 
Talmadge, Charles 
Waldrop, Kathleen 



Fifth Grade. 



Beusee, Allie 
Brock, Elbert 
Callaway, Garnett 
Chastain, Earnest 
Conoway, Cora Lee 
Drake, Daisy 
Fleming, Howard 
Hampton, Earnest 
Jones, Birdie Mae 
Kinnebrew, Mary 
Lawrence, Lorna 
Lester, Patman 



McLeroy, Homer 
Moon, Euby 
Morris, Lewis 
Morrow, Verie 
Parham, Gertrude 
Simms, Hollie 
Sorrells, Dewey 
Thurmond, Willie Mae 
Turner, Mary 
Whitworth, Fannie Mae 
Williamson, Newton 



Sixth Grade. 



Bomar, Jack 
Bondurant, Elizabeth 
Cheeley, Bernice 
Creekmore, Roy 
Griffin, Willie 
Hampton, Belle 
Hughes, Opal 



Iverson, Frances 
Johnston, Charlie 
Poss, James 
Pound, Ida 
Prater, Susie 
Vandiver, Sheila 



Seventh Grade. 



Burson, Frank 
Callaway, Ra^an 
Callaway, Ran nil 
Conaway, Lillie 
Cox, Charlie 
Drake, Anna Belle 
Hudson, Roselle 
Jarrell, Jessie Lewis 
Kenney, Beatty 
Monk, Violet 



Payne, Mozelle 
Presnell, Ida 
Reynolds, Susie 
Stephens', Paul 
Smith, Hattie Lee 
Smith, Lucile 
Waldrop, Louise 
Wardlaw, Powell 
Whitehead, Clifton 
Whitehead, Mabel 



76 



Eighth Grade. 

Bond, Edna Jennings, Vera 

Bryan, Eay Eadiord Kenney, Garland, 

Ford, Carrie Paine, Annie 

Fowler, Frank Snead, Harvie 

Jennings, Gladys Waldrep, William 




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